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I 



THE GIFT OF 




THE FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL 



REPORT 



OF THE 



TRADE AND COMMERCE 



OF 



CHICAGO 



FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1911 



BOARD OF TRADE 

GEORGE F. STONE, Secretary 



CHICAGO 

Hedttrom-Barry Co., Printers 

1912 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



•^ 



PAOS 

Officers and Members of the Board of Trade at its organization, 

April, 1848 viii 

Execative officers of the Board of Trade, 1848 to 1912, inclusive. . . ix 

Officers of the Board of Trade, 1911 • x 

Officers of the Board of Trade, 1912 xi 

Members of the Board of Trade who died during 1911 zii 

Secretary's review xiii 

Report of Board of Directors xxx 

Report of Treasurer xxxiii 

DBTAIIJSD STATISTICS OF CHICAGO FOB 1911. 

Statement showing the entire movement of flour and grain 2, 8 

Flour manufactured in Chicago, for ten years 4 

Monthly stocks of flour in Chicago, for eight years 4 

Receipts of grain at Chicago, by crops, bince 1901 4 

Receipts and shipments of flour and wheat, by routes and by months 5 

Receipts of flour and wheat at Chicago, by crops, since 1860 6 

Weekly range of prices of flour 7 

Weekly range of prices of wheat in store 8 

Monthly range of prices of contract wheat (cash) for a series of years 9 

Receipts and shipments of corn and oats, by routes and by months 10 

Weekly range of prices of corn and oats 11 

Monthly range of prices of No* 2 com (cash) for a series of years. . 12 
Monthly range of prices of No. 2 oats (cash), standard oats (cash). 

and contract oats (cash), for a series of years 18 

Comparative statement of the current bi-monthly prices of flour 

^-^ and grain for seven years 14, 15 

Receipts and shipments of rye and barley, by routes and by months 16 

^ Weekly range of prices of rye and barley 17 

Receipts of flour and grain for a series of years, and the volume of 

^ flour manufactured in the city 18 

Shipments of flour and grain for a series of years 19 

^ Weekly statement of grain in store at Chicago during the past 

two years 20, 21 

<* Weekly receipts and shipments of flour and grain, as posted on the 

bulletin of the Exchange 22, 23 

C Yisible supply of grain for the last two years 24, 26 

Visible supply of grain, monthly, for nine years 26, 27 

Stocks of contract wheat in store in Chicago for six years 27 

Rules governing the inspection of grain 28-33 

Extracts from the rules adopted by the Railroad and Warehouse 

^ Commissioners for the administration of the departments of 

grain inspection and warehouse registration 34 

-^ Rates for inspecting and weighing grain, provisions, etc 35, 36 

Monthly carload inspection of grain received by rail 37 

C Inspection of grain received by lake and canal 37 



:^r^«i90 



IT 

DBTAILBD STATIBTICS OF CHICAGO FOB 1911.— Oonttfiued. 

PAOS 

List of regular Chicago elevator warehouses, and published rates 

of storage on grain 38 

List of private Chicago elevator warehouses, with their capacity. . 39 
Beoeipts and shipments of hogs (live and dressed), by routes and 

by months 40 

Receipts and shipments of cattle and sheep, by routes and by 

months 41 

Receipts and shipments of fresh meats and lard, by routes and 

by months 42 

Receipts and shipments of hog products, other than lard, by 

routes and by months 48 

Receipts and shipments of cattle and hogs for a series of years. . . 44 

Beef and pork packing for a series of years 44 

Pork packing at the principal cities and in the west for a series of 

years 46 

Bi-monthly prices of mess pork for nine years 46 

Bi-monthly prices of prime steam lard for nine years 47 

Weekly range of prices for cattle, hogs and sheep 48 

Weekly cash price of beef products 49 

Weekly range of cash prices of hog products 60, 61 

Fork packing in the Mississippi Yalley 62, 63 

Monthly stocks of provisions for a series of years 64-66 

Monthly statement of stocks of mess pork and prime steam lard 

for five years 67 

Bastbound shipments by rail 68-61 

Daily prices of wheat, com, oats, rye, barley, mess pork, lard, short 

rib sides and live hogs, for cash and future delivery 62-86 

Dai]y cash prices of flax seed 86 

Monthly range of prices for cotton seed oil, oleo stearine, tallow 

and grease 87, 90 

Receipts and shipments of timothy and clover seeds, by routes 

and by months 91 

Receipts and shipments of grass and flax seeds, by routes and by 

months 92 

Weekly range of prices of salt and seeds 93 

Weekly range of prices for beans and potatoes 94 

Monthly prices for coal and coke 94 

Receipts and shipments of hides and wool, by routes and by 

months 95 

Cash prices of grain, grass seeds, flax seed, pork, lard and short 

rib sides, monthly 96 

Range of prices for hides 97 

Receipts and shipments of potatoes and hay, by routes and by 

months 96 

Monthly prices of bay, by carload lots 98 

Stocks of lumber in Chicago on January 1 for a series of years. ... 99 

Receipts and shipments of lumber and shingles, by routes 99 

Tri-monthly prices of lumber, shingles and lath 100 

Receipts and shipments of cheese and butter, by routes and by 

months 101 



V 

DXTAILSD STATISTICS OF CHICAOO FOR l^ll—ConUmied. 

PAQB 

Weekly range of prices of butter, cheese and eggs 102 

Receipts and shipments of eggs for a series of years 102 

Receipts and shipments of various commodities 109 

Receipts and shipments of various commodities for a series of years. 104, 106 

Lake (steam) and rail freights eastward 106 

Grain freights by lake and Erie canal 107 

Average freight charges for wheat and corn to New York since 

185S 108 

European through freights, rail and steamer 108 

All-rail freights eastward 109 

Stocks of ^'contract" pork, ^'contract" lard and short rib sides in 

Chicago for a series of years 110 

Table of clearings by the associated banks of Chicago for each 

month during six years Ill 

Table of clearings by the Clearing House of the Board of Trade 

for each month during six years 112 

Statement of the condition of the national and state banks of 

Chicago 113,114 

Details of the business transacted at the Chicago postofflce 115-118 

Range of prices for iron and steel 119, 120 

Lake commerce of Chicago 121 

Opening of navigation at Mackinac for a series of years 121 

Receipts and shipments by lake at Chicago 122 

Shipments by lake from Chicago weekly « 123 

Arrivals and clearances tor a series of yeaiH 124 

Flour and grain shipments (coastwise, in transit and export) 126 

Exports by lake 126 

In transit shipments 126 

Entrances and clearances, vessel tonnage and cargo tonnage, of 

Chicago, for a series of years 126 

Vessels built and laid up in Chicago 127 

Vessels lost (owned in Chicago) 127 

Receipts and shipments by lake at Chicago and South Chicago. 128 

Vessels owned in Chicago, with their tonnage 129, 130 

Duties collected on imported merchandise during the past five 

years 131 

Custom House inspections 132 

Internal revenue collections 133 

Value of and duty collected on imported merchandise at the port 

of Chicago 134 

Aggregate collections in the principal custom districts of the U. S. 136 

Illinois and Michigan canal statistics 136-138 

GENKRAL STATISTICAL STATSMBNTS* 

Population statistics of the United States, Illinois and Chicago. . 140 
Statement showing the number of alien passengers arrived in the 
United States since 1821, and the number of immigrants 

arrived since 1856 141 



VI 

Q]BN1BRAI< STATISTICAL STATEMENTS— OtmtinuecC 

PAGE 

Public debt of the United States annually since 1791 142 

Detailed statement of the public debt, December 31, 1911 143 

Nationality of vessels engaged in the foreign commerce of the 

United States since 1866 144 

Vessel tonnage of the principal cities of the world 145 

Exports of wheat from various countries, weekly during 1911 146 

Exports of corn from various countries, weekly during 1911 147 

Exports and imports of the United States, with their values, since 

1866 148 

Domestic exports of the United States (detailed) for three years, 

ended June 30 149 

Imports into the United States (detailed) for three years, ended 

June 80 150, 151 

Recapitulation of exports and imports, and coin and bullion move- 
ment 151 

Exports of breadstuffs to Europe since 1856 152 

Total exports of flour and grain for seven years 152 

Exports of flour, wheat and corn from the principal Atlantic ports 

(weekly) in 1911, with their distribution 163 

Weekly exports of grain and provisions from the principal Atlantic 

ports during 1911 154 

Exports of flour, wheat and corn from the principal Atlantic ports 

(weekly) in 1911, by ports of shipment 165-157 

Exports of hog products from the principal Atlantic ports (weekly) 

in 1911 168 

Exports of beef, hog products, butter and cheese during the year 

ended June 30, 1911« with their distribution 159 

Commerce through St. Mary's Falls canal 160 

Hog products exported from the United States to France and 

Germany since 1886 161 

Valuation of property (for purposes of taxation) in Illinois, State 

debt, etc 162 

Valuation of property (for purposes of taxation) in the city of 

Chicago, taxes levied, city debt, etc 163 

Illinois Central Bailroad earnings and tax 164 

Mileage of railroads communicating directly with Chicago 165 

Number of miles of railroads constructed and in operation 

since 1830 166 

Number of miles of railroads in operation in each State and 

Territory at various periods since 1850 167 

Exports of flour, wheat and corn from the United States and 

countries to which exported 168 

Exports of flour and grain from San Francisco 169 

Receipts of domestic produce at San Francisco 169 

Receipts and shipments of flour and grain at New Orleans 170 

Receipts and exports of flour and grain at New York (monthly) . . 171 

Average ocean freights from New York to British ports 172 

Receipts of flour and grain at the principal western river and lake 

ports for the past five years 173 



VII 

mmsmBJLL statistical STATBMSNTS^GontHltied. 

PAOB 

Crops of wheat, corn, oats, rye, Ikurley, buckwheat, hay, pota- 
toes, flaxseed and tobacco, by States, United States Agricul- 
tural Department estimate 174-179 

Grain exports, by crop and calendar years, from the United States 

for a series of years 180 

Estimates of the grain crops of the world 181 

Wheat crops of the world 182 

Acreage, yield and value of the wheat, corn, oats, rye and barley 

crops of Illinois since 1885 183 

Acreage, production and consumption of wheat, corn, oats, rye 
and barley in Illinois, by counties, StateAgricultural Depart- 
ment estimate 184-103 

Statement of the area under cultivation in the United States for 
winter and spring wheat, and the production for a series 

of years 194 

Bushel measure in several states of the Union 194 

Farm animals in the United States, with their value 196-197 

Date of first frost for the past sixteen years 198, 199 

Production, imports and exports of raw cotton since 1872 200 

Liverpool provision stocks 201 

Foreign weights and measures 202,203 

United States tariff duties 203 

Import duties on grain, in the principal countries of the world. .. 204 
English prices of money, consols, cotton and wheat, 1910-1911 .... 206 
London and Liverpool grain and provision quotations, quantities 

on passage and imports 206-209 

Liverpool grain stocks for 1910 and 1911 210 

Production, imports and exports of wheat and flour in the 

United Kingdom, and the population since 1872 211 

Imports of grain into the United Kingdom 212, 218 

Value of foreign coins and currencies 214, 215 

Foreign weights and measures with American equivalents 216-218 

Membership of the Board of Trade 219 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS 



or THE 



Board of Trade at Its Organization, 



APRIL, 1848. 



THOMAS DYEB, Preaidmt, 

vice-presidents: 
John F. Ohapin. Charlss Walkbb. 



gubdon s. hubbabd, 
Elisha S. Wadbwokth, 
Thomas Richmond, 
John Rogers, 
Horatio G. Loomis, 
gsorgb f. fostbb, 
BiCHABD C. Bristol, 
John H. Dunham, 



DIRECTORS: 

Thomas Dyeb, 
George A- Gibbs, 
John H. Kinzie, 
Ctbenus Beers, 
Walter S. Gurnet, 
JOSIAH H. Beed, 

Edward K. Bogers, 
Isaac H. Burch, 



Augustus H. Burlby, 
John S. Bead, 
William B. Ogden, 
Orrington Lunt, 
Thomas Hale, 
Edward H. Hadduck, 
Isaac V. Jermain, 
Laurin p. Hilliard. 



W. L. Whiting, Secretary. 



Isaac H. Bubch, Tre^uurer. 



Beals, Jobefh B. 
Beebs, Cybenus 
Blaikie, Andbbw 
Bband, Alexandeb 
Bbistol, Bichabd C. 
Bbown, S. Lockwood 
BuBCH, Isaac H. 
BuBLEY, Augustus H. 
Gabpenteb, James H. 
Gabteb, Thomas B. 
Case, J. B. 
Chapin, John P. 
Clabke, W. H. 
Cobb, Zenas, Jb. 
DeWolf, a. V. G. 
DeWolf, William F. 
Dodge, John C 
Dbew, Geobge C. 
Dunham, John H. 
Dyeb, Thomas 
Fosteb, Geobge F. 
Fosteb, Jabez H. 
Gage, Jabed 
Gebmain, Isaac Y. 
Gibbs, Geobge A. 

GUBNEY, WALTEB S- 

Hadduce, Edwabd H. 



MEMBERS: 

Haines. John C. 
Hale, Thomas 
Habdy, Isaac 
Habmon, C. L. 
Habbison, H. H. 
HiGGiNsoN, Geo. M. 
High, John^ Jb. 

HiLLIABD, Lj. p. 

Hotcheiss, J. p. 
hubbabd, gubdon s. 
humphbey, d. 
King, John, Jb. 
Kinzie, John H. 
Laflin, Matthew 
Loomis, H. G. 
Lunt. Obbington 
Mabsh, John L. 
Mabsh, Syltesteb 

MOBGAN, T. S. 

Neely, Albebt 
Ogden, Wm. B. 
Pabdee, Thebon 
Fabkeb, Thos. L. 
Payson, H. B. 
Peabson, John 
Peck, James 
Raymond, B. W. 
Bead, John S. 



Beed, Josiah H. 
BiCHMOND, Allen 
BiCHMOND, Thomas 
Bobb, G. a. 

BOCHESTER, JAS. H. 
BOGEBS, E. K. 

BoGEBS, John 
BuMSEY, Julian S. 
bussell, j. b. f. 
Byebson, Joseph T. 
Shebman, O. 
Shoemakeb, Jno. W. 
Smith, Geobge 
Smith, J. A. 
Steabns, M. C. 
Steel, Geobge 
Stockbbidge, F. B. 
Thompson, Thomas 
Thboop, Amos G. 
Wadswobth, E. S. 
Walkeb, Almond 
Walkeb, Chables 
Walteb, Joel C 
Whitcomb, T. 
Whitney, W. L. 
Winn, James 

WiNSLOW, H. J. 



EXECUTIVE OFFICEES OF THE 

BOARD OF TRADE 



SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION. 



ffl; 



Fint Viee-PrttUerti: 
CHARLES WALKEK. 
OHABLES WALKBB. 
JOHN P. OH API K. 
JOHN P. OHAPIN. 
THOHAS HALE. 
CHARLES H. WALKER. 
WM. D. HGUOHTELING. 
BAHOBL B. POMBBOT. 
OBOBQS C. UASTIN. 
OEORGS W. MOBLB. 
THOHAS H. BEEBB. 
THOMAS H. BEEBB. 
ELI BATES. 
OLINTON BSIGOB. 

NATH'L K'. FAIRBANK. 
THOHAS PABKEB. 
THOMPSON HAPLE. 
PHIN'B L. UNDERWOOD. 
LYHAN BLAIR. 
ELIJAH K. BRUCE. 
8AHCEL H. HoCBBA. 
BENJ. F. UDRPHBT. 
CHARLES B. OOLVEB. 
CHABLE8 B. CULVER. 
WILLIAM N. BBAINABD. 
HOWARD PRIEBTLET. 
JOHN B. BBNSLBY. 
DAVID H. LINCOLN. 
J OBI AH STILES. 
WILLIAM DICKINSON. 
JOHN H. DWIQHT, 



IN BY V 



Jr. 



.. NRY IfRENCR. 

OH A3. L. HDTOHINSON. 
OEORQE T. SMITH. 
JAMES H. MILNE. 
GEORGE D. BOHSEY. 
WILLIAM S. BEAV8BNB. 
GEO. O. PABEEB. 
B. W. BAILEY, 
J. G. 8TEEVRB. 
J. T. RAWLEIGH. 
R G. CHANDLBB. 
HILTON O. LIQHTNBB. 
JOHN M. FIBEB. 
RICHARD S. LYON. 
ZINA B. GARTER. 
BICHABD B. LYON. 
HENRY O.PARKBB. 
JAMES NIOOL. 
WILLIAM N. BOKHABDT. 
EDWABD S. ADAMS. 
WILLIAM L. GBBOBON. 
GBOKQK a. MoKEYNOLDS. 
WALTER PITCH. 
JOHN H JONES. 
JAMBS C. ROOEBB. 
JOHN A. BUNNELL, 
JAMBS BRADLEY, 
J. O. P. HEKBILL. 
PBANKM. BUNCH. 
EDWABD ANDREW. 



Seetmd Vice-FraUmU. 
JOHN P. OHAPIN. 
JOHN P. CHAPIN. 

None! 



BBENEZEB q. wolcott. 
john l. hancock. 
charles randolph, 
charles j. gilbert. 

.roHH C. DORE. 
BLBAZDB W. DENSMOBB 
CALVIN B. GOODYEAR. 
JIRAH D. COLE, Jr. 
HENBY A. TOWNER. 
PHILIP W. DATEB. 
WILLIAM N. BRAINARD 
WILLIAM N. BBAINABD 
HOWABD PBIB8TLBT 
JOHN R. BBNBLEY. 
DAVID H. LINCOLN. 
J03IAH STILES. 
WILLIAM DICKINSON 
JOHN H. DWIGHT. 
HENRY W. ROGERS. Ja. 
RANSOM W. DDNHAM. 
WILLIAM E. MOHENBT 
J. HENRY FRENCH. 
CHAS. L. HUTCHINSON 
GEO. T. SMITH. 
JAMES H. MILNE. 
GEORGE D. HDMSEY. 
WILLIAM S. 8EAVEBNS 
QBORGB G. PABKER. 



BENRT O. PARKKB. 
JAMBS NIOOL. 
WILLIAM N. BCEHA&Dl 
EDWARD 8. ADAMS. 
WILLIAM L. GREOSON 
H. M. 8. MONTGOMERY 
WALTER FITOH. 
JOHN H. JONES. 



JOHN A. BUNNELL. 
JAMBS BRADLBY 
J. O. F. MERRILL 
PRANK M. BUNCH 
EDWARD ANDREW 
FRANK B. BICE 



UU W. L. WHRma. 



/ah II E. Daujba. 



UN Oboboi F. ftion from July 



OFFICERS 



or THB 



BOARD OF TRADE OF THE CITY OF CHICAGO 



FOR 19 11 



IRANK M. BnNCH.:ifll Vie».Pftrid«t 



JOHN a F. MERRILL, Fkcridaot 

EDWARD ANDREW. Sd Vie».FMidaot 



Tuui RZFiBXiro 1012 

JAIIES a MURRAY 
ERNEST 0. BROWN 
a F. SCHNEIDER 
JOHN C. WOOD 
CHAS. P. RANDALL 

QBO. F. STONE, SeeratHT 
WALTER & BLOl 



dibbgtob8: 

Tbrm Expiring 191S 

ALEXANDER 0. MASON 
ALBERT E. GROSS 
ROBERT E. TEARSE 
EDWARD F. LELAND 
WILLLkMa DILLON 



Tbrm Expiring u14 

charles b. pierce 
TH. E. CUNNINGHAM 
DAVID S. LA8IER 
CALEB H. GANB7 
LESLIE F. GATES 



WNEY. Amtant SeenUx; 
SAMUEL POWELL, 



ERNEST A. HAMILL, Tiwranr 

HENRY S. ROBBINS, CoumI 
Home Mwiager 



EZECDTIVB. 

ON FINANCE. 

ON REAL ESTATE.. 

ON RULES 

ON LEGAL ADVICE. 

ON ROOMS 

ON MEMBERSHIP... 
ON WAREHOUSE... 



STANDIHO OOMMirr 

M 



ON GRAIN 

ON CLEARING HOUSE. 
ON MARKET REPORT.. 



ON VIOLATION OF RULES. 



ON TRANSPORTATION. 



ON WEIGHING 

ON CLAIMS 

ON METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATION. 

ON PROVISION INSPECTION 

ON FLOUR INSPECTION 



i« 



u 



ON FLAXSEED INSPECTION. 
ON OTHER INSPECTION 



ON ARBITRATION ON GRASS AND 
FIELD SEEDS 

ON INSOLVENCIES 

ON MEMBERS' RATES 

ON CALL 



ON PROMOTION- 



IBS or THB BOARD OF DIRROTORS 

tearse, scm^eider and leland 
mason. cross and la8ier 
wood, mason and gates 
randall, wood and dillon 
brownTpierce and mason 
dillon. cross and tearse 
andrew, bunch and wood 
, cunningham. murray and andrew 

i MURRAY, PIERCElW. N. ECKHARDT. E. L. GLASER. F. B. 
( RICE. GEO. A. WEGENER AND A. L 80MERS 
WOOD. RANDALL AND CANBY 
BUNCH. ANDREW AND WOOD 
RANDAii, ANDREW, BUNCH, CUNNINGHAM, WOOD AND 

TEARSE 
PIERCEiMURRAY. BROWN, GATES, E. L. QLA8ER, Q. B. 

M ARCY, G. W. kiiXES, T. W. BROPHY. Jr^ AND P. H. 

SCHEmiN 
ANDREW, BROWN AND CUNNINGHAM 
LELAND, CANBY AND GATES 
CANBY. CUNNINGHAM AND LASIER 
CROSS. J. A. BUNNELL, HARRY BOORE, JOHN ROBERTS 

AND A. T. FULLER 
GATES. B. A. EGKHART, F. B. RICE. L HORNER AND V. J. 

LASIER, SCHNEIDER AND CANBY 
DaLON, BROWN AND GATES 
( F. E. WINANS. T. M. HUNTER, A. L. SOMERM}. A. HBATK 
} ADOLPH QER8TENBERG, G. A. WEGENER AND 0. 8 
( GREEN 
** CROSS, RANDALL AND GATES 
" SCHNEIDER, LELAND AND CANBY 
„ j W. N. ECKHARDT. E. L. MERRTTT, G. B. VAN NE^ J. T. 
1 GRIFnN AND S. T. GRAFF 

BPSCIAL CGIIMITTBB 

fBUNCH, LELAND, ANDREW. ARNOT, CLEMENT. A. J. 
A WHITE, JAMES PETTIT, W. L. GREQ80N AND H. N 
( SAGER 



M 



IN8P10TOR8 

INSPECTOR AND REGISTRAR OF PROVISIONS JOHN A. TOBEY 

INSPECTOR OF FLOUR JOHN T. CANVIN 

INSPECTOR AND REGISTRAR OF FLAXSEED CHARLES F. LIAS 

INSPECTOR OF HAY HENRY R. WHTTESIDB 

WEIGHER OF PACKING HOUSE PRODUCTS JOHN A. TOBEY 

WEIGHER OF OTHER COMMODITIES H. A. FOSS 



OOMMITTBB 07 ARBITRATION 



TlRM BXPIRINO 1912 

JOSEPH W. BADENOCH ARTHUR S. JACKSON 
FRANCIS L. SCHREINER WILLIAM E. HUDSON 
FRANCIS B. FOX 



TlRM BXPIRIKO 1018 

JOHN E. BRENNAN EDWARD F.XHAHN 

HENRY G. CAMPBELL JAMES J. FONES 
RALPH A. SCHUSTER 



TlRM BXPIRINO 1912 

MICHAEL P. KELLEY ROBERT W. CARDER 

HORACE 0. NEWHALL HENRY M. PAYNTER 
HENRY A. RUM8EY 



OOMMITTVI or APP1AL8 

TCRH BXPIRINO 1913 

EDWIN A. DOERN JOHN R. LEONARD 

HOWARD FIELD W. P. MACKENZIE 

HARRY a SHAW 



OFFICERS 

or THE 

BOARD OF TRADE OF THE CITY OF CHICAGO 

FOR 1 9 1 a 



EDWARD ANDREW, lat 



FRANK M. BUNCH. PrcBkleiit 



FRANK B. RICE. 2d Vice-Prenlent 



1013 



ALEXANDER 0. MASON 
ALBERT E. CROSS 
ROBERT E. TEAR8E 
EDWARD F. LELAND 
WILLIAM S. DILLON. 

GEO. F. STONE, Seeratazy 

WALTER a BLOWNEY. Antant Swntvy 



DDtBCrOBS 

EzrauMO 1914 

CHARLES B. PIERCE 
TH. E. CUNNINGHAM 
DAVID S. LA8IER 
LEBUE F. GATES 
JOHN GARDEN 



Tbbm EzpauMO 1016 

ROBERT McDOUGAL, 
JOSEPH SIMONS 
ADOLPH GERSTENBERG 
BENJAMIN S. WILSON 
L. HARRY FREEMAN 

ERNEST A. HAMILL» Treanrar. 

HENRY S. R0BBIN8, CottnBd 



SAMUEL POWELL, Clauing House Manager 



STAMDOie coMMinns or no boaio or snacTOBS 



ON PROMOTION. 



LELAND. TBARSE AND MoDOUGAL. 

MASON. LA8IER AND GARDEN 

GATES. RICE AND SIMONS 

SIMONS. LELAND AND FREEMAN 

CROSS, GATES AND GERSTENBERG 

CAR^N. CROSS AND SIMONS 

MASON. CUNNINGHAM AND McDOUGAL 

CUNNINGHAM. ANDREW AND DILLON 
i RICE, PIERCE. GARDEN. GERSTENBERG, J. C. MURRAY. 
I wTn. ECEHARDT and GEO. A. WEGENER. 

LASISR, GATES AND FREEMAN 

ANDREW. PIERCE AND WII^N 

( TEARSE, CUNNINGHAM. FREEMAN. LELAND. ANDREW. 
1 GERSTENBERG AND SIMONS 

( PIERCE, ANDREW, J. C. MURRAY, G. W. HALES. E. L. 
{ GLASER. T. W. BROPHY. Jb.. G. E. MARCY, JAS. BRADLEY. 
I J. J. STREAM AND GEO. S. BRIDGE 

ANDREW. CUNNINGHAM AND RICE 

DILLON. LASIER AND McDOUGAL 

GARDEN, TEARSE AND WII^ON 
( FREEMAN. J. A. BUNNELL, H. BOORE. J. ROBERTS AND 
( A. T. FULLER 

RICE. B. A. ECEHART, I. HORNER AND Y. J. PETERSEN 

GERSTENBERG. LASIER AND GARDEN 

WII^N. MASON AND DILLON 

(GERSTENBERG. A. L. SOMERS. F. E. WINANS, T. M. 
t HUNTER. C. A. HEATH. G. A. WEGENER AND G. S. GREEN 

DILLON. CROSS AND GATES 

WIIiK)N, TEARSE AND CROSS 
• W. N. ECKHARDT. E. L. MERRITT. G. B. VAN NESS. J. P. 
GRIFHN AND S. T. GRAFF. 

BPicuL coMMrma 

( McDOUGAL. PIERCE, LELAND, J. C. F. MERRILL. S. P. 
.Mene.{ ARNOT. J. C. MURRAY. A. J. WHITE. Hi N. SAOER AND 
( W. L. GREGSON 

ZNaPBCTORa 

INSPECTOR AND REGISTRAR OF PROVISIONS JOHN A. TOBEY 

INSPECTOR OF FLOUR JOHN T. CANVIN 

INSPECTOR AND REGISTRAR OF FLAXSEED CHARLES F. LIAS 

INSPECTOR OF HAY HENRY R. WHITESIDE 

WEIGHER OF PACKING HOUSE PRODUCTS JOHN A- TOBEY 

WEIGHER OF OTHER COMMODITIES H. A. FOSS 



EXECUTIVE 

ON FINANCE ■ 

ON REAL ESTATE ' 

ON RULES • 

ON LEGAL ADVICE • 

ON ROOMS. • 

ON MEMBERSHIP " 

ON WAREHOUSE • 

ON GRAIN • 

ON CLEARINGHOUSE * 

ON MARKET REPORT " 

ON VIOLATION OF RULES ■ 

ON TRANSPORTATION ■ 

ON WEIGHING AND CUSTODIAN " 

ON CLAIMS ■ 

ON METEOROLOGICALOBSERVATION « 

ON PROVISION INSPECTION • 

ON FLOUR INSPECTION ■ 

ON FLAXSEED INSPECTION 

ON OTHER INSPECTION 

ON ARBITRATION ON GRASS AND 

HELD SEEDS 

ON INSOLVENCIEB 

ON MKMBRHfl* RATES 

ON CALL. 



« 
« 



« 

m 



ooMMTma or ABBmuTioif 



Tmi EzrauNO 1013 

JOHN E. BRENNAN EDWARD F. CHAPIN 

HENRY G. CAMPBELL JAMES J. FONES 
RALPH A. SCHUSTER 



TXRM EXPIKING 1014 

FRED. G. MILEY WARREN A. LAMSON 

FJ^LE M. CO MBS EMILE J. GARNEAU 

LUTHER S. DICKEY. Jb. 



coiofimB or kmuM 



Tbbm Ezpibino 1913 

EDWIN A. DOERN. JOHN R. LEONARD 

HOWARD FIELD W. P. MACKENZIE 

HARRY B. SHAW 



Tbbm Expibing 1014 

ARTHUR S. JACKSON JOSEPH W. BADENOCH 
FRANCIS L. SCHREINER J. EDWARD WYNNE 
JOHN H. WHEELER 



Ill IRemortain* 



MBM BBB8 OF THB BOABD OF TBADE WHO DIBD DURING lOU. 



ALBERT W. WALKER 
LORENZO B. ROLAND 
JAMES A. BAKER 
SAMUEL H. GREEN 
M. C. MITCHELL 
D. EDWIN HARTWELL 
CARTER W. BRANCH 
FRED J. LEVERING 
JOHN H. WRENN 
JAMES PETTIT 
M. J. NEAHR 
EDW. L. OPPERHEIM 
FREDERICK A, LENNON 
ADOLPH GERLING 
JOHN B. ADAMS 



GEN ERAL REV IEW. 

Mr. J. C. F. MERRILL, Preadent, 

Board op Trade op thb City op Chicago. 
Mt Dear Sir: 

In accordance with an honored custom, and in conformity with the 
rules of this Association, it is my pleasure to present to you the Fifty* 
fourth Annual Report of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago cover- 
ing the year 1911. 

In presenting my report for the year 1910, it was my observation that 
a careful examination of fundamental commercial conditions showed a 
serious and gratif3nng purpose everywhere towards a readjustment of 
business conditions after a period of rampant commercial activity dtiring 
the previous years. An examination of the same conditions during the 
year just closed reveals this policy still in operation which should be a 
matter of congratulation to blO. concerned in a conservative and rational 
administration of business affairs. Only by a careful conservation of 
our commercial and industrial energy will this nation be fully prepared 
to direct the forces which inevitably will soon assure us a prosperity 
more bountiful and widely distributed than any we have yet known. 

While business conditions dtuing the last year have not been feverishly 
active, it should not be concluded that they have been stagnant. Every 
indication is at variance with any such idea as that of commercial distress 
or apprehension. Industry is not in a condition of exhaustion but rather 
of pausing until those concerned can see clearly some signs of returning 
optimism. Our banking conditions are sound and money plentiful at 
reasonable rates of interest; labor ample and well paid, and the agri- 
cultural crops, the basis of the entire industrial structure, while not enorm- 
ous, have been reasonably bountiful at fair prices. Accordingly, viewing 
conditions generally, one may report that while not so favorable as desired, 
and even hoped, yet on the other hand, they show a steady improvement 
and a genuine promise of future betterment. 

One matter of comparatively recent development both in this 
country, and among all other civilized and commercial nations 
as well, should be noted in passing. This is the steadily growing 
policy that commerce with other nations is a benefit and not a misfortune, 
and that the wider such commerce with other nations becomes and the 
greater its volume, the more prosperous and enlightened is the nation 
which shares in it. It seems, therefore, that this Association has genuine 
cause for gratification upon the constant improvement in trade relations 
with all nations and all peoples, bringing nearer as it does the time when 
the markets of the world will be opened to all nations upon terms recipro- 
cally beneficial to all. 

The position of Chicago as the world's greatest grain and provision 
market ^ows no sign of an early or permanent decline. While the accumu- 



XIV 

lation of grain receipts at Chicago upon several occasions during the last 
year threatened to present a complicated and unhealthy situation, yet 
the steady advancement of prices and a general increase in the demand 
have restored normal and satisfactory conditions at this market. From 
the standpoint both of the receiver and shipper, the movement of grain 
both to and from this market, while not all that could be desired, has 
nevertheless been in sufiBident volume to maintain these essential elements 
of the grain business in a high state of prosperity. 

One line of work during the last year should be especially commended. 
This is the effort of your Committee on Promotion in conjunction with 
the officers of the Association and others well qualified by ability and 
experience to remove in the minds of the public at large those misconcep- 
tions of the work and fimction of speculation in the grain trade. This 
work has been carried on through the press both in the City of Chicago 
and outside of it, by speakers at various conventions of farmers and 
business men, and contributions to magazines of wide circulation 
and influence. Looking back over the work of the year in this direction, 
those who have had an opportunity to judge of its effect feel confident 
of a slow but certain change in public sentiment favorable to this as well 
as all other produce exchanges where the bujring and selling of agricultural 
commodities for future delivery is carried on. 

In one particular, I regret that I cannot report as satisfactory a condition 
of affairs at this time as I did in my last Annual Report. At the present 
time, due almost exclusively to the sentiment in the Southern states 
against the exchanges, various bills have been presented to Congress at 
Washington seeking to limit speculative trading in agricultural commod- 
ities, including grain and cotton. One such bill has recently been re- 
ported out of the Committee on Agriculture to the House of Representatives 
against the vigorous protest, however, of a minority of such Committee, 
including the Chairman himself. Based upon the latest and most authentic 
information which I can obtain, there seems small likelihood of the passage 
of this bill or any other of similar purport at this present session of Congress 
due to the congestion of other business awaiting action. 

A committee of this Association in conjunction with similar com- 
mittees of other exchanges, sought in every legitimate way to demonstrate 
the un-wisdom of the proposed legislation and retiuned from Washington 
firmly convinced that they had removed all doubt in the minds of the 
Committee before which the bill was pending as to the legitimate nature 
of the transactions on this and other produce exchanges. In this, however, 
they were disappointed by subsequent events. Whatever the outcome 
of this particular bill, it should but inspire all who know and appreciate 
the splendid economic functions performed by our produce exchanges 
to increased vigilance and zealous effort in order that these essential 
instrumentalities of modem commerce may not only be preserved, but 
may take their proper place in the economic structure of modem business. 



The following tables show the percentages of last year's crops 
of wheat, com, oats and barley on hand March 1, 1912: 

SUMMARY OF CROP REPORT FOR MARCH, 1912. 
BY STATES 





Corn 


Wbxat 


Oat* 


•Bi«. 


St.t« or 


ii 
1- 
h 

Is 


§;. 


Ill 


ll 


f 


« 
II 


III 
hi 


1 

ll 


i! 

IJ 
II 


III 

III 


n 

■5s 

i 


ISXiii:::. 


20 

3S 
31 
W 

1 

H 

H 

a 

1 

30 
30 

»s 

u 

21 

1 

i 


as 

1 

1 
.1 

\ 




.! 
1 

M 

30 

! 

3 

] 
I 


1 

1 

i 

i 

i 

IS 

se 
w 

8« 
80 
TO 

1 
1 


>. 


38,000 





1 

30 
24 
40 

34 
34 

i 
1 

38 

38 
33 

1 

3» 
23 

34 

in 


ooiooo 

I8.44O.O0O 

tSIooo 
i!.4i2,aoo 

sssloDo 

884.000 

i.waoaa 

1.8M.a00 

•s 

ilisriooo 

2i,4M.000 

4e!B»4[ooo 
ao,M2,o(K) 

10!787!00O 
8.4DO.000 
6S1.OO0 

MH.OOO 
380.DOO 

2,?M.O00 
437,000 

'■S 

8,838,000 
^^ 
18»,*8M00 


1 

J 
i 

i 

1 

31 
3 

a 

I 

8 

1 
J 


II 




13 




" 
































i 

33 


1.800,000 

420 000 
1X73,000 

3,OM:oOO 
2,280.000 

'Ii 


30 

M 

1 






■■» 




10 




Wat VirgiiiB 

SnIliCuoiiDa.':.':: 










34 

1 

38 
M 

i 


10 


S4 

1 

83 
18 
M 

30 




Uf''^' 


; 










is-;.:::;;;::- 


", 


SS£^.::::; 


s 

8 










mr-- 


..." 








3t 

i 

Til 


828.000 

1,380.000 
310.000 

2,171J»0 
33,038.0m 


i! 
1 

1: 

«8 

80 


















38 




No Main 


18 












I 

a 


mm 

78,000 

IROOO 

Si.OM.WO 


kT 


i 




Br-'-E: 


TJTT 






Ujj 


i 
1 


IS 

TrtiSoo 

m. 730,000 
SOO.tS3.000 

rea.g7i.S6i 


11 


11 

Te!a 


33.8 
23:9 


100,311.000 

143,8(2,000 
148,731,000 

11.088.000 

28.018.000 
188.748.000 


SJ:! 

80.3 

11 

>1.8 

ll 


ii 

i 


137,803,000 
71,730.000 


Ii 

n.t 

31.1 

11 
M 




















































#2g 


tari 




[Udll 


Si 


u 


l217M0a0b 

Nt 87.2 pa 
ao«t(<UM 


vbl. 
nntwiJ 

ma 


oil 


Jl pa MM of 
miid43.tai.O 


OInlH 

tilt OCX 


intM 



Attention is called to the following statements obtained from 
the United States Department of Agriculture, showing the extent 
of the wheat, com, oat, rye and barley crops of various countries 
for a series of years: 

WHEAT CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED, 1907-1911 



XVII 

WHEAT CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED, 1907-1911— Cont'd. 



IVIII 



CORN CROP OP COUNTRIES NAMED, 1906-1910 



OOUMTIUIB. 


1800. 


180T. 


1908. 


1008. 


1910. 


North Ammiea: 
United States 


ButheU. 
2,827.416,000 
23,889,000 


Bushels. 

2,582,320,000 

21,888,000 

1,877,000 

140,000.000 


BiuMs, 

2,668,651,000 

21.742.000 

1.126.000 

160,000.000 


Bu9ha». 

2,668,180,000 

18,211.000 

1,047,000 

170,000,000 


Bu$hoU. 
2,886,280,000 


OMiadft (OvitaHo). . r t 


17.853,000 


'* (Quebeo) 


860,000 


Mezioo 


110.066,000 


180.766.000 


Total North America 


8,061.470.000 


2,765,586.000 


2.841J&1W,000 


2,741.448.000 


8,005,738,000 


South Amwiea: 
Armntti^A ,,., 


184,912,000 

846.000 

8,226.000 


n,768,000 
1,500,000 
5,860.000 


136,066,000 
1,218,000 
6,000,000 


177,167,000 
1,178,000 
6.671,0(K) 


176,380,000 


Ohiie 


1,878,000 


Umffuay 


6.500.000 


Total South America. 


188,084,000 


78,687,000 


143,273.000 


186,006.000 


188,706,000 


Buropo: 
Auftria-Hongary— 
AuBtria 


18,177,000 

162,825,000 

20.47U.000 

8,800.000 


16,580,000 

166,610,000 

17,834.000 

6.468.0CO 


15,170,000 

146.124J000 

20,536,000 

a821,000 


16,102,000 

161,868,000 

21,752,000 

10,872.000 


17,388,000 


HuiiffarT Div>i>er » - * 


187.733.000 


Croatla-SiaTonia 


26.588,000 


Bo«iila>H erzegovina 


10,061.000 


lital iuMft-Iuf 117 


210,472,000 


186.620,000 


100.051,000 


210.684.000 


240.761.000 


Bulgaria 

France 

Italy 


27,780.000 
14.581,000 
«8,0O7,UO0 
15,000,000 
130,546,000 

60.820,000 


14,080,000 
24,027,000 
88,513,000 
15,000.000 
57,576,000 

41.803,000 

1,000 

8,860.000 


20,717.000 
26.247,000 
06,953,000 
15,000,000 
78,882.000 

48,663,000 


20.472,000 
26.075,000 
08.288,000 
15,000,000 
70,138,000 

28,223,000 


28,860,000 

28,888.000 

101.728,000 


Porwiir*! t 


15,000,000 




103.666.000 


BuMla— 
HuMia Droner 




Poland 




Northern Oauoaiia 


11,181,000 


11.448.000 


10,875.000 




Mil iHriA (lu«p«ui) 


70.501,000 


50.764.0U0 


61.112.000 


88.588.000 


77.181.000 


Berria 


27,786.000 
18.714.000 


17,681.000 
26.372.000 


21,010,000 
20,115,000 


27,558,000 
20.488.000 


27.600,000 


Siwln 


27;366,000 


Total Europe .... 


608,.')87,000 


488,643,000 


628,697,000 


53^247,000 


644.864,000 


Afriea: 
Algeria ........ 

Union of South Africa '. ! 


544,000 
30,000,000 
20.000,000 


409,000 
66,000.000 
20,000,000 


426,000 

66,ooaooo 

20.000.000 
85.426.000 


807,000 
65,000,000 
20,000,000 


668,000 
70.284,000 
20,000.000 


Total AfHca. 


50,844.000 


85,402,000 


85.807.000 


90,846,000 


Auttnlatia: 
Australia- 
Queensland 


2,283,000 

5,714,000 

661,000 

1,000 


3.620,000 

5,845,000 

727,000 

1,000 


3.101.000 

4.671,000 

526,000 

1,000 


2.865,000 

5,380,000 

671,000 

2,000 


2,588,000 


new South Wales 


7,822,000 


▼lotoria 

Western Australia 


1,186,000 
1 000 


South Australia 


7,000 














Total Australia. 


8,608.000 
053.000 


10,483.000 
418.000 


8,388.000 
518.000 


8,908,000 
736.000 


1L118,000 


New Zealand 


760,000 


Total Australasia 


9je62.000 


10.812.000 


8,807.000 


9,644.000 


11.863,000 


Grand Total 


3.928,947,000 


3.420.180.000 


3.608,822.000 


3,557,162.000 


4,027.110,000 


Beoapitulatiok : 
North America 


3,061,470,000 

198,984,000 

608,387,000 

50,844.000 

9.262,000 


2,756,506.000 

78,627,000 

488.643,000 

85,402,000 

10,912,000 


2.841,519,000 

143,273.000 

529,697,000 

85,426,000 

8,907,000 


2,741,448,000 

185.006,000 

536,247,000 

85.807.000 


3.095,739.000 


South America 

Europe 


188.708,000 
644.954.000 


Africa 


go.fi4S.000 


Australasia 


9,644.000 1 ii!863!666 






I 



XIZ 

OAT CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED, 1907-1911. 



XX 



OAT CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED. 1907-1911— Continued 



Countries 


1007. 


1008. 


1009. 


1910. 


1911. 


AuatnlMia. 

AiwtraU»: 
Qnwnfllttid 


80.000 

1,440.000 

9.124.000 

924.000 

472,000 

2.04^000 


10.000 
870,000 

5,365.000 
902,000 
745.000 

1.574.000 


40,000 

1,154.000 

11.475.000 

1.820.000 

705.000 

i.9oaooo 


52.000 
2.029.000 
8.168.000 
1.247.000 
1.287.000 
2.422.000 


52.000 


New South Wales. 


1.766.000 


ViotoriA 


10.006.000 


South Australim 


1.172.000 


Western AuBtralia 


801.000 


Taunaoia. 


2.128.000 


Total Australia. 


14,041,000 


0.475.000 


16.654.000 


16.200.000 


15.914.000 


New Zealand. 


11.665.000 


16.496.000 


19,603,000 


13.953.000 


10.412.000 


Total Auatralaaia 


25.590.000 


24.070.000 


86.157.000 


29.1531000 


26.326.000 


Grand Total 


8.608.896,000 


8,008,798.000 


4.379.287.000 


4,214.727.000 


3.820.670.000 


Recapitulation. 
North America 


983.0n.000 
12.878.000 
2,479.438.000 
85,607.000 
17.300.000 
25.696.000 


1,078.109.000 
84,188,000 

2.849.826,000 

107.280.000 

14,886.000 

24.970,000 


1,382,704,000 
69.062.000 

2,803.660.000 
78.068.000 
19.016.000 
86,157.000 


1,530,028,000 
86,888,000 

2,516,268.000 
86,268,000 
22.188,000 
29.168.000 


1.292.264.000 
47.782.000 

2.868.344.000 
06.984.000 
20.020.000 
26.830.000 


South America 


£urope 


Asia 


Africa 


Australasia 





RYE CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED, 1907-1911 



BARLEY CROP OP COUNTRIES NAMED, 1907-1911 



Countriei 


im 


IMg 


1MB 


UIO 


uu 


North Anuriu 
United SUM 


1S3.S»I.(>» 


BndKli 
l«.7SfcOM 


1^^ 


Bgriuli 

i7s.sn.ooa 


intulooo 


CanxU: 


IT.OOO 
I .71S,0(» 


11 


lll.8N.a00 
141(3,000 

£:ciw:doo 


73,000 

li 




























ToUlCuurf. 


u.ia.aoa 


4«,7M.000 




U,11S,000 


MULOOO 










«3»,000 


IJlOftOOO 


ToM Nonh Amaria. . . . 

Aiutria-HunXyT' 


aoi.iag.ooa 

ass 


220.SIVIOO 

(Ki,ig7,ooa 
M.s!i,ooa 

2.SB1/I00 
1JI8«X00 


m.ntfioa 

isaii 


~mMvm 


WJSWOO 












BoMua-HenecoTin* 




Total Auittia-HuDCUT- ■ 




110,703,000 


lS7,ss^oao 


117.7(7.000 


UMH,000 






4.«g,ooo 
11.111.01)0 
3a.iflfl.ooo 

I.131.0OD 

.SffiS 

it.ooa.ooo 

S.953.000 


S1,SM,000 

G.ooaooo 

3.S32;0Da 

ivIms.ooo 


1.718,000 
31,783,000 

mSoo 

9,iB3|ooa 
sissalooo 






Ksnooo 
























W,2S.O00 


"r^^ ™.r 


4U0MXW 


M.IH.000 


183.1tg,00D 

H,«7i.aaa 
ss.toaooo 






















Total RiiMi>{EuioiiMD)< 


M4.10I,DOO 

S.IW.MO 
E3.W8.IXX) 


Sa7.16S.0D0 

s,»<i.oaa 


UiTSiOOO 
3,113.000 


41S,SS3;O0O 

S,Ot7.0O0 
7t.30g,000 
ll,7ft3.00a 


4auM,aao 










Oieat Bnuio — 

i^Stt:-.:::;::::;:::: 

w»i™ 


lil.Wfl.000 
T.Mfl.OOO 
1.681.000 
fl.Ul.00O 


lis 

7,0M.000 


i.soi.ooa 

8.2S8.000 


s 


u.i7g.oao 

(.ItCOOO 






ToM) Doited Eiorlom... 


••.S07.000 


«I,UII.000 


71.118,000 


(3,01)7.000 


somooo 


ToulBurop* 


»0(>.023.000 


»1.27».000 


l,07S.Ma,000 


l,OOl.»IO,0O0 


i.oi>Ma7.ooo 


Cypru* 


i,«eB.ooo 

<IO.«0,OOCI 


%<ia,ooo 

B7.US.000 


I,«».000 

ST.lg5,D00 


1.101,000 

•■••g!!! 

— smsm' 


i.m,ooo 






H™.: 


4.3at.ooa 


iK 


4.flM.0O0 


















Total Rni^ (AMatio) ■. . . 




10,JS2.000 


8,881,000 


10.100.000 


10,000.000 




Htt.S31.00a 


100.183.000 


«e.t8aM0 


«jflr.ooo 









xxin 



BARLEY CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED, 1907-1911— Continued 



Countries. 


1007 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


Africa 

Algeria. 

TuBis 

Union of South Afrioa 


Buheb 

41.548.000 
0.506,000 
3,000,000 


Buahda 

31.511.000 
6.057.000 
8.000.000 


Buahda 

50.006.000 
9,186,000 
8,000,000 


Buahda 
48.708.000 
' 6.660.000 
8,000,000 


Budida 

47.588.000 
6.600.000 
3.000.000 


Total Afrioa 


54,040.000 


39,568.000 


62,194,000 


58,368,000 


57.188.000 


Aiutnlia: 

Queenaland 

New South Wales 


163,000 
158,000 
1.285,000 
507,000 
50.000 
146.000 


67.000 

77.000 

1.003.000 

585.000 
79.000 

154,000 


142,000 
172,000 
1.706,000 
852,000 
77,000 
190.000 


200,000 
281.000 
1,066,000 
713,000 
106,000 
158,000 


86.000 
86,000 


Victoria 

South Australia 


1.383.000 
562.000 


Western Australia 


35,000 




147.000 


Total Australia 


2.310.000 
1.068.000 


2.055.000 

i;aoo,ooo 


3.139.000 
2.000.000 


2,513,000 
1.345.000 


2.298,000 


New Zealand 


950.000 








3.387.000 


3,255.000 


5.139.000 


3.858.000 


3.248.000 


Grand total 


1.271.237.000 


1.264,803,000 


1.477.502.000 


1.883.193,000 


1.380.023.000 


Recapitulation 


204.930,000 

906.023.000 

102.839.000 

54,049.000 

8,387,000 


220,518,000 

901.270,000 

100,183,000 

39,568,000 

3.255.000 


235,719,000 

1,075,862,000 

98.588.000 

62.194,000 

5,139,000 


225,309.000 

1.001.390.000 

94.267,000 

58.368,000 

3.858.000 


207.381.000 


Europe 

Aula 


1.004.807,000 
107.399.000 


Afriea 

Australasia 


57,188,000 
3,248.000 



XXIV 



The following table is a statement of the extreme prices in 
Chicago of whe^t each year for the period of forty-seven years, 
indicating the month in which such prices were obtained: 



WHEAT. 



1866 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1876 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

188U 

1881 

1882 

X8oo* • . . • 

1884 

1886 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892...... 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899..'.... 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1906 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 



Months the lowest prioes 
were reaohed. 



December 

February 

August 

November 

December 

April 

August 

November 

September 

October 

February 

July 

August 

October 

January 

August 

January 

December 

October 

December 

March 

October 

August. 

April 

June 

February 

July 

October..^ 

July 

July 

January 

August 

April 

October 

December 

January 

July 

October 

March 

January 

August 

August and September 

January 

July 

August 

November 

April 



BMDge for the 
entire year. 



}1 65 

J2 03 
(€d2 86 



)1 28 
30i 
261 
76i 

)l 14 



Months the hiirhjeBt prices 
were retkohed. 



83l 



Januarv. 

November. 

May. 

July. 

August. 

July. 

Feb'y, April and Sept. 

August. 

July. 

April. 

August. 

December. 

May. 

April. 

December. 

January. 

October. 

April and Maf • 

June. 

February. 

April. 

January. 

June. 

Septembfr. 

February. 

August. 

April. 

Februaiy. 

April. 

ApriL 

May. 

NovembWi 

December. 

May. 

May. 

June. 

December. 

September. 

September. 

Sept., Oct. and Dec 

Feoruary. 

May. 

October. 

May. 

June. 

July. 

October. 



The following table is a statement of the extreme prices in 
Chicago of com each year for the period of forty-seven years, 
indicating the month in which such prices were obtained: 

CORN. 



TMtf. 



Montlis the lowwt prtMS 
wert reaohed. 



December 

February 

March 

December 

January 

December 

December 

October 

June 

JanuaiT 

December 

February 

March 

December 

January 

April 

February 

December 

October 

December 

January 

October 

February 

December 

December 

February 

December 

January 

December 

February 

December 

September 

January and February 

January 

December 

January 

January 

December 

December 

January 

January and December 
February and March . . 

January 

February 

January 

December 

Jan., Febr., March. . . . 



Bann for tbe 
•noM jaar. 



88 



52 
44 
46 
31 

29^ 

27 

40 



871 



81i 
361 
71 
48 



33 
33i 

27) 
39j 
37i 

34j 
33 



42 

39 



)1 

)1 
)1 



46] 



88 

00 

12 

02i 

97i 

94i 

66i 

481 

64i 

86 

76i 

49 

58 

431 

49 

43i 

761 

81i 

70 

87 

49 

45 

6U 

60 

60 

54i 

80 

00 

441 

59i 

64i 

30| 

32| 

38 

38i 

m 
m 

88 

63 

68i 

64i 

64f 

66i 

82 

77 

68 

76 



Months the highest prlc< 
were reached. 



January and February, 

November. 

October. 

August. 

August. 

May. 

March and May. 

May. 

December. 

September. 

May and July. 

May. 

April. 

M^arch. 

October- 
November. 

October. 

July. 

January. 

September. 

April and May. 

July. 

December. 

May. 

November. 

November. 

November. 

May. 

May. 

August. 

May. 

April. 

August. 

December. 

January. 

November. 

December. 

July. 

July and August. 

November. 

May. 

June. 

October. 

May and September. 

June. 

January. 

November. 



XXVI 



The following table is a statement of the extreme prices in 
Chicago of Contract Oats each year for the period of forty-seven 
years, indicating the month in which such prices were obtained: 



OATS. 



Tear. 



18e5 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 



MonthB the loweBt prices 
were reached. 



December 

February 

August 

October 

October 

September 

August 

October and Novemb'r 

April 

August 

December 

July 

August 

October 

January 

August 

February 

September 

September 

December 

September 

October 

March and April 

September 

October 

February 

October 

January 

July 

January 

December 

September 

Fe Druary 

August and September 

August 

August 

January 

November 

March 

October and December 

September 

March 

January 

August 

August 

October 

March | 



Range for the 
entire 3'ear. 







Months the highest prices 
were reached. 



January. 

November. 

June. 

May. 

July. 

May. 

March and April. 

June. 

December. 

July. 

May. 

September. 

May. 

July. 

December. 

January and May. 

October. 

July. 

March. 

April. 

April. 

January. 

December. 

May. 

February. 

November. 

April. 

August. 

May. 

June. 

June. 

February and March. 

December. 

May. 

February. 

June. 

December. 

July. 

July. 

February. 

July. 

June. 

September. 

July. 

May. 

February. 

November. 



XXVII 



The following table exhibits the monthly range of cash 
prices for No. 2 Rye in the Chicago market during the past 
sixteen years: 





89 SS^ 39 i(S{o SS SS5 S?3 SSS S9S SS9 S9 Ss9 


1 


8S !3S SSS SSS n^ 33 SS9 :;S ^S 9S :$S !S§: 


§ 

^4 


:3I9 98 SS S3 9n C9 ^$ 99 99 92 93 SiS 


§ 


SS 2S 9S S§S S3 S3 SS SS 23 2S 93 93 


§ 


S3 23 33 S3 SS 38 SS 9S S3 ^3 99 99 




^9 9S 9S 93 S3 93 ^^ 3S 33 33 3S S3 


§ 


36 SS SS 3^ 33 S3 SS 93 9S 9S 9S 99 


§ 

V4 


9S 9S 9S 9S 9S 93 9S S3 33 33 S3 S3 




SS> 3^ Is5 3^ lgS SS^ 3^ 3!S fs ^1 SS SIS 


1 


?:S ^S SS SS S3 SS 3S &S 3S ^S SS 33 


1 


33 S3 83 S3 S3 83 SS SS 33 83 83 83 


^4 


88 3S 3S gS si 33 S3 38 35 SS SS S3 


1 


•it ^t ^n «^ 

SSd 83 S3 S3 SS SS S8 S^ SE: SS SS SS 


1 


si is SS 3SS SS SS si SS SS SS S^ SS 


1 


S9 88 S8 1:8 S8 SI: SS SS SS SI: 1:8 88 


V4 


SS 83 38 S8 SS SpS 8& 8S 3S SS 88 S3 

• • • 




^^■^' '^y^* '••• "■ • ■ *^^» ' • ■' "••• ^» ■■ *^^» •»*»» '*•" "*■■■ 


• 


i 1 1 1 H ^^ 1 1 M 1 



XXVI 1 1 ^ 



WHEAT HARVEST CALENDAR. 

January New Zealand, Chili. 

February and March . . Upper Egypt, India. 

April Lower Egypt, India, Syria, Cyprus, Per- 
sia, Asia Minor, Mexico, Cuba. 

May .Texas, Algeria, Central Asia, China, Ja- 
pan, Morocco. 

June California, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, 

North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennes- 
see, Virginia, Kentucky, Kansas, Arkan- 
sas, Utah, Colorado, Missouri, Turkey, 
Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, South of 
France. 

July New England, New York, Pennsylvania, 

Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Iowa, 
Wisconsin, Southern Minnesota, Nebras- 
ka, Upper Canada, Roumania, Bulgaria, 
Austria, Hungary, South of Russia. Ger- 
many, Switzerland, South of England. 

August Oregon, Washington, Central and North- 
em Minnesota, Dakota, Manitoba, Lower 
Canada, Columbia, Belgium, Holland, 
Great Britain, Denmark, Poland, Central 

Russia. 

September and October . Scotland, Sweden, Norway, North of 

Russia. 

November South Africa, Santa Fe. 

December Burmah, New South Wales, Argentina, 

Australia. 



XXIX 

Included in this report is a copy of the rules, by-laws and regula- 
tions of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, in force May 
1, 1912; also a statement giving the percentages of last year's crops 
of wheat, com, oats and barley in farmers' hands March 1, 1912; also 
a list of the membership on May 3, 1912. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. F. STONE, Secretary. 



My acknowledgments are due, and are hereby tendered to Messrs. Howard, Bartels 
ft Company and Davidson Commission Co., Chicago; Hon. O. P. Austin, Chief Bureau 
of Statistics of Department of Commerce and Labor; E. E. Hooper, Esq., Secretary of 
the Lumbermen's Exchange of the City of Chicago; Hon. Daniel A. Campbell, Postmaster 
of the City of Chicago; C. B. Murray, Esq., Editor Cincinnati Price Current; Hon. John 
C Ames, Collector of Customs of the City of Chicago; Edward O. Ray, Esq., Western 
Manager Shoe &. Leather Journal, Chicago; Arthur G. Leonard, Esq., General Manager 
Union Stock Yards & Transit Company; Geo. J. S. Broomhall, Esq., Editor Liverpool 
Com Trade News, Liverpool; Messrs. H. V. and H. W. Poor, New York; Chicago Bureau 
of IStatistics; J. K. Dickirson, Esq., Secretary State Board of Agriculture, Springfield, 
Illinois; Hon. James Wilson, Secretary Department of Agriculture; and to official 
statistical literature generally, both foreign and American. 



REPORT OP THE BOARD OP DIRECTORS. 

To ike Members oj the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago: 

Gentlemen : 

The Directors of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago herewith 
submit their report of receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year ended 
January 8, 1912. 

Also a statement of the financial affairs, property and general condition 
of the Association. 

FmANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE BOARD OF TRADE OF THE 

CITY OF CHICAGO FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

ENDED JANUARY 8, 1912. 

RBCBIFTS. 

From annual assessmeDts $123,412 50 

From special asseBBments 41,126 00 

From iDterest on special assessment fund 26 80 

From interest on general fund 1,120 03 

From transfers 'of membership 11,100 00 

From sale of visitors' tickets 635 00 

From sale of messengers' tickets and badges 2,492 00 

From sale of clerks' tickets 1,575 00 

From sample table and drawer rentals 3,526 00 

From rentals, public telephones 350 06 

From rentals, telephones in Boom G and Exchange Hall, less 

rent paid telephone companies 12,214 66 

From building, rents. Janitor service, electric lights, etc 189,797 43 

From adjustment of fire loss 68 00 

From Board of Trade Clearing House 1,250 39 

From Grain Sampling and Seed Inspection Department. . . . 48,673 40 

From Flaxseed Inspection Department 1,610 17 

From Quotation Department 40,733 76 

From Weighing Department 876 04 

From Cleveland Telegraph Co 1,803 20 

From Cleveland Telegraph Co , refund of money advanced 

Type Telegraph Co 2,000 00 

From interest on building bonds held by Board of Trade. .. 1,860 00 

From costs recovered in sundry cases 871 21 

From costs recovered market report committee cases 2,303 10 

From proceeds, charity base ball game 4,988 04 

$444,399 78 
Casta on band January 9, 1911 98,309 60 

$642,799 38 



XXXI 
BXPBNDITURBS. 

Interest and expenses on bonded indebtedness t 39,923 66 

Taxes on real estate 46,672 76 

Taxes on personal property 98 80 

Real estate account, wages of employes, fuel, water, gas, etc. 61,234 18 

Beai estate account, repairs to building 13,951 17 

Real estate account, premiums on liability and glass insurance 1,223 55 

Salaries, Secretary's office 22,036 00 

Salaries, Exchange Hall employes 6,217 76 

Salaries, Visitors" and Settling Room employes 3,597 40 

Legal expenses, Henry S. Robbins' salary 5,000 00 

Legal expenses Henry S. Robblns' fees and sundry expenses. . 11,949 73 
Legal expenses, Elevator allowance and Ex Lake 'Grain Rate 

cases 5,024 59 

Counsel of Executive Committees, salaries and office expenses 7,124 51 

Market Report Committee 17,866 68 

Transportation Department — Salaries and office expenses 14,682 94 

Market Department— Cable service 5,409 96 

Market Department - tickers and wire service 4,321 14 

Market Department — quotations from Minneapolis, St. Louis, 

New York, Winnipeg, Dululh and Kansas City 6,496 38 

Market Department— Salaries and general expenses 7,377 69 

Grain Sampling and Seed Inspection Department 42,776 62 

Flax Seed Inspection Department 2,770 90 

Exchange Hall janitors' salaries, including scrubbing 3,860 00 

Bxcliange Hall janitors' soap, towels and supplies 666 08 

Washing towels 790 72 

Ice 305 85 

Promotion Committee 4,423 77 

Examination of grain warehouses 871 40 

Grain Committee 6,200 00 

National Board of Trade 422 20 

Council of North American Grain Exchanges 331 02 

Delegates' expenses 1,092 43 

Expenses and disbursements to various charities, Base Ball 

account 4,988 04 

Annual reports and rules 3,300 00 

Stationery, printing and postage 2,772 82 

Statistical information from New York, Chicago Custom 

House and Union Stock Yards 1,528 49 

Telegraphing 1,395 41 

Balloting 315 00 

Repairs, aside from Board of Trade Building 75 40 

Furniture 578 82 

Newspapers, books and circulars 270 54 

Telephone in Secretary's Office 153 64 

Clock service in Exchange Hall 49 50 

Messengers' badges 146 30 

Extra stenographic work 160 65 



XXXII 

AaditiDg books and vouchers $ 352 50 

Auditing^ books and vouchers Clearing House 135 00 

Uniform suits foremployes 371 40 

Engrossing resolutions adopted by the Board of Directors 425 00 

Subscription to Policemen's and Firemen's Benevolent Ass'd. 60 00 
Appeal and Arbitration fees paid committees in cases held 

over from 1910 25 00 

Miscellaneous expenses 358 96 

Purchase of $90,800.00 Board of Trade 4% bonds 91,029 24 

Purchase of seventeen memberships under the provisions of 

Sec. 31 of Rule IV 39,175 00 

$401,867 49 

Gash on hand January 8, 1912, (General Fund $46,796 89 

Gash on hand January 8, 1912, Special Assessment 

Fund 4,635 00 51,431 89 

$542,799 38 

Gash on hand January 8, 1912: 

In hands of Ernest A. Hamill, Treas $ 50,230 21 

In hands of Geo. F. Stone, Seo'y 1,201 68 

$51,431,89 



The bonded indebtedness of the Board of Trade is $094,300.00, of this 
the Board has purchased and holds for cancellation bonds to the amount 
of $67,100.00 par value. Moneys amounting to $15,000.00 stand to the credit 
of the Board of Trade on the books of the telegraph companies; there are 
also the following bills due and uncollected: 

Rents $ 386 24 

Grain Sampling Department 3,444 82 

Quotation Department Drops 72 00 

$3,903 06 

Outstanding obligations: 

Interest on bonded indebtedness, 12-1-11 to 1-9-12 4,106 43 

Taxes on real estate and personal property, 1911 (estimated) . . . 45,000 00 

Real Estate Bills 2,039 32 

Office and Department Bills 6,868 84 

$ 58.106 50 



To the President and Board of Directors of the Board of Trade of the 
City of Chicago: 

Gbntlbmbn: — In accordance with the instructions of the 
Finance Committee, we have completed a careful audit of the 
Financial Records of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, 
covering the period from January 9, 1911, to January 8, 1912, All 
the records in the cash book, journal and ledger were proven cor- 
rect. The cash balances as shown in the hands of your secretary 
and treasurer, were checked and proven correct. Vouchers were 



XXXIII 

presented for all cash pajrments properly approved by the Finance 
and Real Estate Committees. We also certify that the foregoing 
report is correct in accordance with the records audited. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVERETT AUDIT COMPANY 
By Eric J. Everett, C. P. A. Vice President. 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



To the President and Board of Directors of the Board of Trade 
of the City of Chicago: 

As Treasurer of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, from the 
9th day of January, 1911, I beg to report that — 

I bad on hand January 9, 1911 $ 97,706 29 

I have recelyed in sundry deposits from the Secretary of the 
Board from January 9, 1911, to the close of the fiscal year, 
January 8, 1912, inclusive 445,645 88 

$543,441 17 

I hare paid 1544 checks, draw a by the Secretary and duly 

countersitfned, amouDtingto.. $493,210 96 

Learinf a balance on hand at this date of $50,230 21 

BRNBST A. HAMILL, Treas. 

REAL ESTATE 
J. C. WOOD, Chairman Real Bstate Committee 

The amount collected in the Real Estate Department, comprising rents, 
electric lights, etc., amounted to $139,865.43, as against $135,558.68 in 
1910. The bonded indebtedness has been reduced during the year, 
$50,000.00, and now stands $994,300.00 bearing 4 per cent interest, pay- 
able on the first day of June and the first day of December each year. 
The Board holds uncanceled bonds amounting to $67,100.00 par value. 

The amount paid for repairs on the building was $13,951.17, as against 
$6,369.34 paid in 1910. The increase is partly accounted for by the ex- 
penditure of $4,364.55 for repairs on the old storage battery, which were 
contracted for in 1910, and, therefore, an expense inherited by the Real 
Estate Committee. The expenses of 1910 were brought down to the 
lowest point consistent with safety in view of the possibility of erecting 
a new building. The project of the new building being abandoned for the 



XXXIV 

time being, there was necessity for more than ordinary expense attending 
the building in 1911. 

The Board received $1,850.00 as interest on building bonds held by the 
Association. Taxes on personal property amounted to $98.80 as against 
$432.90 paid in 1910. 

MEMBERSHIP 

The membership of the Board on the 8th day of January, 1912, numbered 
1,627, showing a reduction of 20 during the year. 

The pro rate amount assessed by the Board of Directors, under the pro- 
visions of Section 5 of Rule IV, for the ensuing fiscal year, is $75.00. 

BOARD OF TRADE CLEARING HOUSE 

SAMUEL POWELL, Manager 

Below is a statement showing the clearances and balances, by months, 
of the Clearing House for the year 1911, with corresponding totals for the 
year 1910: 

OFFICE OF 

CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE CLEARING HOUSE 

Chicago, December 30, 1911. 
Geo. p. Stone, Secretary. 

Below please find report of business at above place for year ending this 
date: 



DATE 



January , 

February 

March , 

April , 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September , 

October 

NoTember 

December 

Totals 

Preceding Year. 



CLEARANCES 



4»562.073.47 
4,616.862.80 
4.823.491.04 
5.258,886.75 
6.966.664.94 
9.374.785.56 
9.419.476.85 
6,326.719.65 
4,961,686.91 
3.385,032.26 
4.428.836.63 
3.746.277.87 



66.770,784.63 
94.167.772.02 



BALANCES 



1.678.716.10 
1.787,087.94 
1.644.525.46 
1.676.269.46 
2,182,965.02 
2,954,805.97 
3.001,377.50 
1,606.960.53 
1,642.132.08 
1.215.693.41 
1.487.083.60 
1.299.859.56 



22.177.47563 
31.660,969.51 



The total clearances for the year amounted to $65,770,784.63 ; balances, 
$22,177,475.63. The total clearances for the preceding year amounted 
to $94,167,772.02; balances, $31,660,969.51. The total clearances for 
the year 1909 amounted to $91,232,308.50; balances, $31,265,530.55. The 



XXXV 

total clearances for the year 1908 amounted to $78,539,952; balances, 
$26,667,724. The total clearances for the year 1907 amounted to 
$106,586,118; balances, $34,895,227. The total clearances for the year 
1906 amounted to $43,480,450; balances, $16,784,093. 

Amount received, $16,996.68; disbursements, $15,746.29; profit, 
$1,250.39. 

Yours truly, 

SAMUEL POWELL, 

Manager. 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WEIGHING DEPART- 
MENT OF THE CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE 

H. A. FOSS, Weighmaster 

January 2, 1912. 

Mr. Edward Andrew, Chairman, 

Weighing Committee, Board of Trade of the City of Chicago. 

Dear Sir: 

I take pleasure in transmitting to you this my fourteenth annual report 
concerning the work of the weighing department. 

During the year 1911 the department weighed 311,231 cars, of which 
192,742 were received into elevators, warehouses and the various manu- 
facturing plants; 111,630 cars were shipped out; and 6,859 cars were trans- 
ferred from car to car. The department weighed 87,407,170 bushels of 
grain to and from vessels and canal boats, and 26,357 bags of seed. The 
total quantity of grain weighed, figuring on the basis of 1,250 bushels to 
the car, reached approximately 476,500,000 bushels, of which 389,000,000 
bushels were transported by cars, and the remainder by lake craft. This 
is 8,316 more cars, 23,206,835 bushels more grain to and from vessels, 
and 5,370 more bags of seed than the department weighed during the year 
1910. 

We have received complaints of shortage on 2,599 cars. The shortages 
on 803 of these were accounted for. 

In discussing the subject of shortages at this time, it is appropriate to 
mention the fact that a large percentage of complaints that were received 
concerned grain the weights of which were determined by estimating 
the quantities loaded. I would also call attention to the fact that on 
1,051 of the 2,599 cars reported short in weight,the amounts of discrepancy 
comidained of were not given. 



XXXVI 

The average vessel shortage this year is 16.4 pounds on each 1,000 
btishels of grain handled. This, as compared with the average for last 
year, is a reduction of 7 pounds per 1,000 bushels. 

The demands on the scale inspection department have been increasing 
largely, especially from country points. On account of this increased 
demand for our services in this connection, we were compelled to add to 
this branch of the service another scale inspector. In this regard we 
were very fortunate in being able to secure a man of recognized ability. 
This addition to our scale inspection force has enabled us to meet aU the 
demands from the coimtry for scale inspections. In this connection I 
wish to say that the results of these trips have been very gratifying, as 
they have eliminated many otherwise permanent causes for shortage and 
the resultant ill-feeling. During the year we tested the scales at 60 
country elevators, containing 115 scales. We found 82 of these, or 71 
per cent out of order. The records of the year's work show that we tested 
various scales in Chicago and country points, as follows: 

730 hopper scales, of which 166 were found incorrect. 
170 track scales, of which 38 were found incorrect. 

68 wagon scales, of which 45 were found incorrect. 

33 small scales, of which 13 were found incorrect. 

This makes a total of 1,001 scales, of which 252, or 25 per cent were 
found incorrect. 

On account of the number of scales at country points found out of con- 
dition by the department, and on account of the careless, slipshod manner 
in which many shippers have been caring for their weighing machines, all 
of which is conducive to inaccuracy, contention and ill-feeling, we com- 
piled a circular letter entitled, ** Helpful Hints for Wide-Awake Weighmen," 
which we distributed to the grain trade throughout the states of Iowa and 
Illinois. The demand for this circular letter from railroads, too, 
necessitated the printing of 6,000 copies. 

We also compiled and distributed an illustrated placard entitled, "How 
to Prevent the Leakage of Grain." This placard illustrated eflEective 
methods of preventing leakage of grain from cars by the intelligent appli- 
cation of burlap, and was wdl received. In fact, in addition to the 5,000 
copies sent out by the weighing department, various railroad companies, 
with our consent, reproduced the placard and distributed many thousands 
more. 

In addition to this placard on how to prevent the leakage of grain, we 
compiled a leakage table showing the various points of cars where leakage 
most frequently occurs. This table covered the cars examined by the 



XXXVII 

department during the past 5 years; and although originally we only had 
1,000 copies printed, the demand from the railroads and shippers for the 
table was so great that it was necessary for us to have 22,000 copies printed. 
Oar experience has shown that literature of this character goes a long way 
toward the elimination of errors, and towards decreasing shortages and 
promoting harmony. 

As the cause for many of the shortages at Chicago go unexplained, the 
stealing of grain in transit or stored in railroad yards is a matter of great 
]mix>rtance; and in this connection our policing force has been doing effec- 
tive work during the past year, and our efforts have resulted in 67 arrests. 
Of these 18 paid fines of two hundred and eighty dollars; 12 were sent to 
the John Worthy School; 23 boys were paroled to juvenile ofl&cers; and 
14 were discharged. 

Turn now to the custodian department, which was inaugurated June 
14, 1911. This bureau has passed the experimental stage, and is working 
out to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. Not only has the depart- 
ment proved a protection to the sellers of grain, but also to the elevator 
operators and to the banks. The elevator people, for their part, are 
exchanging custodian car certificates for round-lot custodian certificates, 
which the banks are accepting as secured collateral. In connection with 
the running of the department, we have seventy employees each under a 
$5,000.00 bond with the American Surety Company, while those who are 
authorized to sign the custodian certificates are each under $40,000.00 
bond. The practice at the elevators includes the weighing of all grain 
in and out of the houses that are under the supervision of the custodian 
department, men being stationed up and down stairs to look after the 
weighing, tmloading and loading of the grain. We also have inaugurated 
a system of seals, by which it is impossible for the elevators to run their 
machinery, when we are not present, without evidence of it being ap- 
parent to us. This sealing system includes devices for sealing the rail- 
road tracks, elevator doors, or elevator engines, according to the con- 
ditions prevailing at the various plants. As an additional precaution we 
have an estimating force, which is continually estimating the quantity of 
grain in the elevators. We aim to estimate quantity in each elevator 
at least once a month, and oftener if deemed necessary. We also estimate 
the amount of shrinkage incidental to handling and cleaning the grain, and 
make deductions in the stocks accordingly; and we verify these estimated 
shrinkages by weigh-overs from time to time. 

The system we have inaugurated for handling the clerical part of the 
custodian business, such as making records, issuing custodian certificates 



XXXVIII 

and providing for their delivery with the least delay, is along the lines in 
vogue in the weighing department, and this system has proved very 
satisfactory. Our office is open from 6:30 o'clock in the morning to 6 KM) 
o'clock in the evening, and during the busy season we have some of our 
clerks in both the custodian and weighing departments work eictra hours, 
so that we are enabled to deliver both the weight certificates and the custo- 
dian certificates promptly. 

It is with regret that I have to annoimce that Mr. A. E. Schuyler, who 
has acted as my assistant for many years, and who has been with the weigh- 
ing department for the past 17 or 18 years, his services beginning during 
the regime of Mr. John Walker, has resigned to accept an offer of Mr. J. A. 
McNulty, Agent for the Grain Door Reclamation and Car Coopo'age 
Bureau. 

You will find attached the financial report for the year. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 



STATEMENT FOR YEAR 1911 
Rbcbipts: 

Car Weighing $103,488.02 

Canal Boat and Seed Weighing 1,540.06 

Special Weighing 14,032.40 

Vessel Weighing 12,177.22 

Interest 58.16 



$131,304.86 



DlSBUKSBlIBNTS: 

Salaries $109,634.68 

Carfare and Extra Time 9,832.34 

Expense 10,691.60 

Shortages Paid 87.77 

Loss Bad Accounts 182.43 



$130,428.82 



Profit $ 876.04 



ACCOUMTBD FOR BT: 

Cash $ 6,170.55 Due Board Jan. 1, 1911 . $ 17,168.17 

December Weighing 10,520.32 Profit for 1911 876.04 

Book Account 1,353.34 

$ 18,044.21 $ 18.044.21 



XXXIX 

January 9, 1912. 

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT 
WILLIAM M. HOPKINS, Manager 

Gentlemen : — 

I beg to herewith submit brief summary of the work of the Transpor- 
tation Committee for the year 1911. 

Rate adjustments of the greatest importance to this Board and on which 
this Committee has been working for some time have been brought to 
completion. Besides, many matters of lesser importance but of value to 
this market, have been accomplished. 



READJUSTMENT OF RATES TO THE SOUTHEAST 

For many years the tariff adjustment of rates from territory west of the 
Mississippi River has been such as to prevent any movement of grain from 
that section through Chicago to points in the Southeast. The Missouri 
River markets, St. Louis and the Ohio River markets have enjoyed a 
monopoly of that business except at such times as Chicago could get in. 
during the old cut-rate days prior to 1906. 

On November 13, 1911, the Commission rendered a decision in the so- 
caUed Rosenbaum case after having had the matter before them for two 
years. Under this decision the Chicago grain merchant can draw grain 
from territory west of the Mississippi River, including Missouri River 
points, and market it at points in the Southeast on a basis of rates equal 
to the combination made through Peoria, St. Louis and Ohio River gate- 
ways. 

The importance of this decision to this market is readily seen as it opens 
up new territory for distribution. Your Committee believes that the 
increased business which will result to the members from securing this 
additional territory justifies the maintenance of the Transportation 
Department if no other thing had been accomplished during its existence 
up to the present time. Furthermore, this Committee beHeves the 
members should know that this result was accomplished by the Trans- , 
portation Committee without any expense for legal fees in prosecuting the 
case before the Interstate Conmierce Conmiission, where it was most 
bitterly contested on the part of the Southern railways who desired to keep 
out of that territory and retain it for the Ohio River markets. 



CHICAGO A RATE BASING POINT 

In the report of the Transportation Conmuttee for 1910, reference was 
ntiade to the effort toward making Chicago a rate basing point and mini- 
mizing the use of transit. This work has been prosecuted during the 
year and the roads have finally announced the date of effectiveness of 
Illinois Specific Rates and cancellation of through tariffs from Illinois 
points, as April 1. 
The important benefits resulting from this rate adjustment are: 
First: More than 1500,000 which is now tied up in freight refunds will 

be released. 
Second: The same rates wiU apply on grain to be reshipped by water 
as on grain to be reshipped aU rail. 
Besides, the use of transit will be minimized and consequently the 
expense of handling your transit accounts will be correspondingly reduced. 

ELEVATION ALLOWANCE 

Since the report of the Transportation Committee a year ago the Supreme 
Court has decided that the railway companies may pay for the service of 
transferring grain. It is expected that the result of this decision will be 
that the transfer allowance paid at Chicago will not be disturbed. 

EQUALIZED RATES 

In the opinion of the Committee, the measure of rates themselves is of 
less importance than the comparative relation of rates to this market and 
to other competing markets. It was fotmd that it cost less to handle 
grain from Elansas City to Buffalo via Milwaukee than via Chicago, by 
reason of the C. M. & St. P. Ry. Co. transferring the grain from cars to 
vessels through its own elevator at Milwaukee at a charge less than the 
same service could be secured through any elevator at Chicago. This 
Department succeeded in getting the railways to assume the cost of this 
transfer at Chicago, thus putting this gateway on a parity with Milwaukee 
on through shipments of grain via lake to eastern markets. 

More than thirty cases similar to the above, dealing with discriminations 
in rates, rules or regulations, were acted upon by this Committee and in 
each instance the discrimination was removed. A detailed report of these 
cases can be obtained by application to the office of the Manager. 

The policy of this Department remains unchanged, that is, of endeavor- 
ing to accomplish the needed reforms by co-operation with the railways. 
Recourse is had to the Courts or the Commission only when other remedies 
have been exhausted. It may be worthy of note that the policy of the 



ZLI 

railway companies appears to be to increase their revenue by every means 
possible and to resist any changes that involve the slightest reduction in 
their revenue, regardless of the merits of the case. This Department has 
opposed every effort of the railways to advance rates unless a like advance 
to other markets was made. 

During the year this Committee intervened in several cases before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission where our interests were involved and 
reparation claims aggregating more than $14,000 were prosecuted and the 
money in each instance recovered for our members. In all these matters 
no expense was incurred for attorney's fees. 

Your Chairman is pleased to advise that the use of the Transportation 
Department is much more general on the part of the trade than heretofore. 
It is the effort of the Department to encourage members to avail them- 
selves of its services and an increasing number are doing so. 

In conclusion, I beg to express to the members of the Transportation 
Committee, my appreciation of their loyalty and devotion to the work. 
Many meetings have been held and often at a considerable sacrifice of time 
to our members. 

I desire also to acknowledge the conscientious and efficient services of 
the Manager of the Department and with the support of our members, 
continued beneficial results to this market through this Department are 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES B. PIERCE, 
Chairman Transportation Committee. 

REPORT OF LEGAL DEPARTMENT FOR YEAR 1911. 

During the year 1911 a number of important matters, including the 
formulation of a plan for a new clearing-house system, have required the 
services of our legal department. 

While the crusade against bucket shops has not been relaxed, the liti- 
gation during the year has not been extensive. Two new suits were started 
at Pittsburgh, against Harkless & Company, Keystone Commission 
Company, and Spuhler & Company, and permanent injunctions were 
issued,enjoining from using our quotations the following named defendants : 

Isaac N. Harkless, Henry J. Spuhler, 

P. C. Harkless, Prank H. Spuhler, 

Harry O'Brien, William Heck, 

Harry Brown, Emerson Neeley, 

W. M. Rich. Richard Gearing, 

George B. Lane, Verne L. Shoup, 

Prank M. Keene, George £. Pisher, 

James P. Keene, Prank Kennedy, 

Prank Smith. 



XLII 

« 

In the suit brought by the Board at Lincohi, Nebraska, against Herbert 
E. Grooch Company and others, to restrain the theft of quotations, not 
only was a permanent injunction obtained against Herbert E. Gooch 
Company, Herbert E. Gooch, L. B. Tobin, W. P. Archibald, William 
Clendenning, and Frank Sharpneck, but a very important decision was 
rendered, the court deciding that our quotations are not impressed with a 
public use, but are the Board's private property, which it may withhold 
from any person it pleases. This decision repudiates a contrary decision 
by the Supreme Court of Illinois in 1889. 

In the proceeding for contempt at St. Louis against Frank J. Miner and 
others, the Board won a victory in the Circuit Court of Appeals, which 
dismissed the appeal. The defendants have applied to the Supreme 
Court of the United States to compel the Court of Appeals to change its 
decision. A decision is expected early in January. 

The appeal of the Board in the litigation at St. Louis against Thomas £. 
Price, has been submitted to the Circuit Court of Appeals, but it has not 
yet rendered a decision. 

William Lanyon of St. Louis instituted a suit in the Federal Circuit 
Court at Chicago against our Board and James E. Bennett & Company to 
restrain Bennett from settling with the other parties trades he had with 
them as Mr. Lanyon's broker, and also to restrain the Board from dis- 
ciplining Bennett for not doing so. A comer was alleged to have existed. 
The case was heard upon application for a temporary injunction before 
Judge Kohlsaat, and the court held it had no power to, and refused to, 
enjoin the Board from exercising its disciplinary functions. This 
practically ends the case as to the Board. The case is still pending against 
Bennett & Company, against whom an injunction has been issued. 

In July a bill was filed in the State court at Chicago by the Board 
(joining with it a large number of shippers and receivers of grain) to prevent 
the putting into efiFect of an act passed by the last Illinois legislature 
requiring the payment of all fees of the State Grain Inspection Department 
into the State Treasury, and inhibiting their being disbursed without 
legislative appropriation and warrant of the State Auditor. Believing 
that this Act would seriously cripple the State Grain Inspection Depart- 
ment, a bill was filed attacking the constitutionality of the Act. Judge 
Dever in the State Court, however, decided against the complainants, 
and the Supreme Court of the State, by a recent decision, has afiSrmed 
his decree. A delay of six months was, however, secured through a tem- 
porary injunctional order, which will aid in dealing with an embarrassing 
situation until the next legislature can be appealed to for an appropriation 
to furnish adequate inspection service. 



XLIIl 

The suit for alleged personal injuries brought by one Austin Stanton 
against your Board and another defendant has been tried and decided in 
favor of the Board. 

GRAIN SAMPLING DEPARTMENT 

ROBERT P. KETTLES, Chief Grain Sampler 

The amount received for sampling cars by the Grain Sampling Depart- 
ment of the Board, amotmted to $47,893.80, and disbursements, $42,776.62, 
showing a surpltis of $5,117.18. 

During the year the department sampled 112,997 cars of grain, and the 
total ntmiber of bushels sampled for lake shipment aggregated 36,498,647 
bushels. 

As indicating somewhat the volume of business transacted tmder the 
rules of this Board during the past year, we would state that the receipts 
of grain and flour in its grain equivalent for 1911, aggregated 
291.367,982 bushels, as against 294,858,724 bushels during 1910. The 
shipments aggregated 221,429,014 bushels, as against 214,601,080 bushels 
during 1910. 

The shipments of cured meats, in 1911, aggregated 550,849,300 
pounds, as against 562,203,800 pounds, in 1910; of fresh meats, 
870,704,600 pounds, as against 812,076,000 pounds in 1910; of lard, 
302,699,100 pounds, as against 268,702,900 potmds, in 1910; of barreled 
pork, 105,913 barrels, as against 126,728 barrels, in 1910. 

Receipts of all kinds of live stock at Chicago during 1911, aggregated 
16,397,492 head, valued at $339,484,690, brought in 271,660 cars; as against 
14.452,490 head, valued at $357,145,681, brought in 251,080 cars, in 1910. 

In the administration of the affairs of the Board, your Directors have 
kept steadily and persistently in view the supreme importance of main- 
taining the integrity of the declared principles and objects of the Associa- 
tion; of the equitable adjustment of business controversies; the recogni- 
tion of the intent of business contracts so far as that intent can be ascer- 
tained; of not permitting under any circumstances, technicalities, mere 
mistakes, or omissions, to obscure the evident intention of the contracting 
parties. Happily few occasions have arisen to call for the intervention 
in such matters of any of the tribunals of the board. 



XLIV 

CUSTODIAN DEPARTMENT 
H. A. FOSS, Custodian 

The primary object being to secure flie receiving merchants of fhe 

Board in fheir sales to private warehouses 

Your directors grappled successfully, under the lead of the President, 
with the problem which has confronted every directory since the establish- 
ment of the organization, viz. : to secure the absolute validity and integrity 
of grain warehouse receipts issued by private warehouses or elevators, 
located in Chicago, as collateral security. This problem your directorate 
has successfully solved by creating a " Custodian Department, " as defined 
in Section 22 of Rule IV. The creation of this department is acquiesced 
in, and highly commended by the Chicago banks. It is not too much to 
say that this one act alone of the outgoing administration is of great 
satisfaction to your Board of Directors, to the trade; and is considered 
of incalculable benefit to our moneyed institutions, and not less serviceable, 
in a variety of ways, to our merchants ; in fact, it is impossible to exaggerate 
the importance and value of this department. In achieving this result, 
we are pleased to recognize the hearty co-operation of the members of the 
board, who have always stood by the directory in the practice of the 
highest mercantile principles. 

Failure to DeUver or Receive on Contracts 

Another measure of great importance has been secured in the adoption 
of Section 1 of Rule XXIII, which efifectively prevents so-called " comers, " 
which have properly called forth criticism by legislators, both state and 
national, and by writers of more or less prominence upon the subject of 
political economy. 

Much time and effort have been spent in acquainting the legislative 
bodies of the country and the public generally, with the active and practical 
functions of the grain exchanges of the cotmtry, especially those of the 
Chicago Board of Trade; also with the close and vital relation which these 
fimctions sustain to every industry — to the farmer, producer, grain dealer, 
banker, and to the people regardless of political affiliations. 

It was soon discovered in prosecuting the campaign for the general 
diffusion of information as to grain exchanges, their purposes, their func- 
tions; and as to many and effective facilities created and sustained for the 
protection of all interests involved, that dealing in generalities, discussing 
abstract theories of political economy, were unproductive of desirable 
results; in fact, instead of being of benefit to the exchanges, were to these 
institutions a positive injury. Members of Congress who were desirous 
of obtaining a thorough knowledge of the grain exchanges of the country. 



XLV 

in order that they might enact such laws as would best promote the common 
commercial and industrial welfare, vainly sought, tmtil this year, to obtain 
that information which only a practical grain merchant, exceptionally 
qualified by long, successful and extensive experience in the grain trade, 
could impart. This information has been given by your President and 
others to congressional committees, to various commercial bodies in 
di£Eerent parts of the cotmtry, and in many publications. The 
country has long stood in need of facts with relation to the grain exchanges. 
In some instances your directors are reliably informed that members of 
congress regretted that they were not placed in possession of such facts 
before they passed upon pending bills relating to the grain exchanges of 
the United States. 

BIARKBT REPORT DEPARTMENT 

The work of the Market Report Committee has brought forth 
satisfactory results; persistent vigilance has characterized its efforts in order 
that no "bucket shop" may secure the quotations of the board which 
the courts have decided are the property of the association. 

Your Directors respectfully urge that work along the lines set forth in 
the foregoing report be energetically pursued by the new administration. 

IN MEMORIAM 

Names of members who died during the year: 

ALBERT W. WALKER. JOHN H. WRENN, 

LORENZO B. ROLAND, JAMES PETTIT, 

JAMES A. BAKER. M. J. NEAHR, 

SAMUEL H. GREEN, EDW. L. OPPERHEIM, 

M. C. MITCHELL, FREDERICK A. LENNON, 

D. EDWIN HARTWELL, ADOLPH GERLING, 

CARTER W. BRANCH, JOHN B. ADAMS. 
FRED J. LEVERING. 

Respectfully submitted, 

on behalf oE the Board of Directors, 

JOHN C. F. MERRILL, 

President. 



DETAILED STATISTICS 



OF THE 



TRADE AND COMMERCE 



OF THE 



CITY OF CHICAGO 



IN 



FLOUR, GRAIN, PROVISIONS, LIVE STOCK, SEEDS 
HIDES, WOOL, COAL, LUMBER, ETC. 



WITH 



THE DAILY CURRENT PRICES 



OF 



THE LEADING SPECULATIVE PRODUCTS 



FOR THE YEAR 1911 



FLOUR 



The entire maoement of these prod 



Floor, 
BiU. 



Wlieat, 
Bo. 



Com, 
Bu. 



0«ta, 
Bu. 



Rye, 
Bo. 



Barley, 
Bu. 



Laka 

CUcaco, Indiana ft Southern Rj 

Chieaco ft Northweatem Ry 

Dlinoia Central R. R 

Chiraso, Rock Island ft Pacific Ry. . . 
Chieaco, Burlington ft Quincy R. R. . 

Chicago ft Alton R. R 

Chieaco ft Eastern Dlinoia R. R 

Chieaco, Milwaukee ft St. Paul Ry. . . 

Wabaah R. R. (Weat of Chieaco) 

Chieaco Great Western R. R. 

Atchison, Topeka ft Santa Fe Rsr. . . . . 



Minneapblis,8t.Paol ft Saolt Ste.Marie Ry 

Elcia. Joliet ft Eastern Bs 

Clueaco, Indianapolis ft Louisrille Ry . . . . 
^Eastern lines 



l,0fiS.905 

M.017 

a9,17« 

884,886 

78,&25 
106.450 

1,174.475 
118.600 

1.11S.575 
S85.808 
SS8,U5 



8,660 
liB.O» 



614.900 
617,600 

4448,000 
8.148,600 
6J6>jlW0 
8,858,600 

S4S7,000 
1347.600 

1.060,600 
1,116,400 
73,100 
100300 
1,777,600 
4316,000 



1.461,600 

11311380 

»,406.4S0 

6381360 

lf.748,460 

63M300 

11310.780 

6316.100 

6300^460 

8,716380 

4377360 

8,750 

618.750 

414300 

1307.700 



Total receipts 
Flour manuf actuied in the city (estimated 
In store and afloat in harbor, December 
31, 1010 




6360306 
1317300 

105300 



87,118,100 



IO836O3OO 



5311.651 



1.106.016 



Grand totals. 



6.091306 



41,619,751 



109.658316 



1356.160 
17441300 

0,664,780 
14300400 
18306300 

8318,600 

10,411.400 
8301300 

7.186,700 
1368300 



110,600 
1,069300 
1,108300 
1317300 



408.000 
58.700 
58,000 

157300 

».000 

5,000 

688,000 

6.000 

189300 

6300 

16300 

6300 

40300 

0300 



18300 

8357300 

194,000 

1.494300 

1,689300 

84300 

8,000 

7,111300 

11300 

I3O63OO 

76300 

171,100 

4300 

11300 

104,400 



04.099300 



1,700300 



18341400 



6.6OI307 



11,075 



100,701307 



1301375 



»341,100 



_ ^*The Eastern Lines include the Wabash R. R. (east of Chieaco). Pere Marquette R. R..C.C. 
B. ft O. R. R., G. T. W. By.. N. Y. C. ft St. L. Ry. and the Chicago ft Erie R. R. 



AND GRAIN 



ucis at Chicago during 1911 



Shipments. 





Flour, 
Brls. 


Wheat, 
Bu. 


Corn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 


^i^: 


Barley, 
Bu. 


laike — To Buffalo. 


2,058,700 

519,110 

33,190 

165.230 


12.965.900 

16.000 

191.900 


26,949,000 

10,000 

3,598,900 


5.105,300 






To Erie 






To OgdeoBburg 


572,500 






To Falrport 






To Port Huron 




1,230,500 
762,900 
1.105.000 
3,152,900 
3,312.700 
2.768,000 
1.379,200 
1,263,700 
274,500 
2.123,000 


626.000 
631.400 
958,000 






To other United States ports 


11.700 
49.330 


275,000 

75.000 

784.700 

230.900 

95,000 






To Depot Harbor 






To Montreal 






To Midland 




1.102.100 

1.640.800 

122.300 






To Tiffin 








To Meaford 








To CoIUnswood 










To Kingston r 












To other Canadian Ports 
























Totals by Lake 


2,837,260 

9,272 

87,621 

30,342 

8,100 

2.303 


14,634,400 

191.600 

56,900 

63,200 

198.000 

21.400 


47,930,300 

13,900 

109.900 

204,800 

356.250 

1.250 


10,758.400 

5.200 

54.600 

320.500 

244.800 

16,600 






Chicago, Indiana & Southern Ry 

f^KinAffn Ae 'Vnrth vrAHtArn R.V 


2,900 
2.800 
1,000 
1,000 


4,700 

115.500 

2.300 


Illinois Central R, R 


Chicago, Rock Island & Paciac Ry 


3.000 


Chicaco db Alton R. R 






Ohinaco A ESastem IHinois R. R 


91.925 
38.170 


89.800 

724.700 

1,000 


181,250 

408,475 

1,900 


* 'i,'764'.666 

16,500 

8,100 


15,000 


25.500 


Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry 


39,300 


Wabash R. R. (West of Chioaso) 






Ohiiniao Grwat WA^t^rn R, R, 








Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry 

Minneftpolis3t.Paul & Sault Ste.Marie Ry 
Elsin. JoUei 4e Eastern Ry 


21.004 
24.975 


5.000 
23.200 










6,500 


4,400 




1,600 






Chicago, Indianapolis 4e Louisville Ry — 

^PWurtArn LinAfi 


99.275 
2,580,945 


217,600 
7,112,700 


71.000 
38.645.075 


106,100 
64.129,300 


5,700 
795,100 


2,700 
5,697,400 






Tntal nhinmentA 


5.781,092 

95.100 
1,116.404 


23.339,500 

15.930,000 
3.360,251 


87,930,600 

1,293,000 
20,434.926 


77.428,500 

8.721.000 
14,551.897 


823,500 

119,000 
858,775 


5.892,000 


In store and anoat in harbor, December 
31. 1911 


172.000 


Gty consumption and unaccounted for. 


17.278.100 


Orand totals ».-,r-,---,-,-' 


6.992,596 


42.629.751 


109,658.626 


100.701.397 


1,801,275 


23,842.100 







C. ft St. L. Ry., Michigan Central R. R., L. S. ft M. 8. Ry.,P. Ft. W. ft C. Ry.. P. C. C. ft St. L. Ry.i 



FLOUR PRODUCTION. 

Ih$ foUowing shmos the quantity of flour manufactured by the eeverai CMeago miXU 

in each of the past ten years. 



lOlL 
BrU. 


1010. 
BrU. 


1000. 
BrU. 


1008. 
Brls. 


1907. 
BrU. 


1006. 
Brls. 


1906. 
BrU. 


1004. 
BrU. 


looa 

BrU. 


1008. 
BrU. 


1.0S7.000 
htUiAtid 


1.000.000 


1.056,000 


850.000 
Irtlntod 


1.000.000 
litiaftttd 


060,000 


076.000 


750.000 


838,878 


1;B62;2S4 



STOCKS OF FLOUR IN CHICAGO. 

Tke following were Vie etocks of flour in the city on the latft day of each month for eight 

yeare, as reported by Uie Fhwr Inspector. 



January. . . 
Febmary. • 

March 

▲prtl , 

May 

June 

July , 

Auffiut 

September 
October.... 
November. 
December. 



lOll. 
BrU. 



120.200 
83,800 
76.400 
82.200 
87.300 
S5Ji00 
81,000 
0-2.000 
85.250 
01.060 
07.600 
06.100 



1010. 
BrU. 



02.600 
00.000 
02.000 
86.000 
84,450 
84.800 
75.000 
80.600 
04.700 
86,250 
00.600 
105.300 



1000. 
BrU. 



85,000 
00.000 
100,000 
101.560 
06,500 
00.600 
65.000 
64.260 
71.050 
75.000 
0K,500 
00,400 



1006. 
BrU. 



60.000 
58.000 
55,000 
65.700 
65,600 
55.000 
60.000 
95.500 
05.000 
00.500 
05.000 
00.500 



1007. 
Brls. 



116.700 
01.350 
94.500 
85,000 
65.500 
60,000 
57.400 
65.000 
60.0U0 
46.000 
65.000 
55,000 



1006. 
BrU. 



76,200 
66.000 
82,150 
66.450 
70.400 
75.600 
60.300 
50;250 
50.200 
75,800 
80.600 
94,000 



1006. 
BrU. 



68,500 
60.500 
60.500 
87.000 
80.000 
66.600 
61.000 
60,600 
07,200 
87.000 
06..000 
•4,000 



1004. 
BrU. 



90,860 
84,260 
41,000 
80.850 
86,800 
80,600 
80.750 
80,150 
80,000 
80.500 
88,500 
38,600 



RECEIPTS OF WHEAT, CORN, OATS, RYE AND 

BARLEY AT CHICAGO 

by crops since 1901. 



Yetr. 


Wheat. Buheb. 
Yeut enaing July 1. 


Corn,BiuhdB. 
Yeut ending Dee. 1. 


Oata.BiuhdB. 
Yeut ending Aug. 1. 


Rye.BiuhdB. 
Yeen ending Joly 1. 


Bericy. Bvhels. 
Yeut ending Aug. 1. 


1001 


52,806,000 
45.120,000 
36.726.000 
25,408.000 
26.000.000 
22.722.000 
31.331.000 
23.486.000 
21.806.000 
27,014.000 
28,002,000 


00,226.000 

47,507.000 

00.118.000 

80.610.000 

117,002,000 

101.085.000 

124,420.000 

87,831,000 

03,080.000 

08,082,000 

113.484.000 


100,820,000 
71,006.000 
06.240.000 
75.140,000 
71.641.000 

100.504.000 
02.526.000 
07.074.000 
84.878.000 
88.050,000 

108.002.000 


1,033.000 
2,814,800 
4,330.100 
2.466.700 
1.842.600 
2.525.300 
2.552.500 
2.067.300 
1,532.800 
1.362.400 
1.121.500 


14,486.000 


1002 


15.383.000 


1903 

1004 


10.604.000 
24,150.000 


1006 


26.486.000 


1906 


26.011.000 
20.064.000 


1007 


1006 


18.000.000 


1000 


20.145.000 


1010 


26.730.000 


1011 


20.101000 







FLOUR AND WHEAT. 

Rteeipts and shipments <^ thtst products during 1911, by rouUs. 





Flodb. 


' W««iT. 




Bri». 


"fSET'- 


RMBivtd. 

Bu. 


"JT^ 






i,s37.3«a 


i 

i 






SS. 
■•KtS 
'•K 

33I.11S 














































u,m 




mri^Ir'^ ft E^M *R^* ^^ "*** "*"**' 






.»-:^ 


»as 














8,SSB,S1» 


fcTSLOW 


87,118.100 









FLOUR AND WHEAT. 

Rtetipts and shipments i^tfust products during 1911, by months. 





Flodb. 


Wbut. 




Brit 


Sh^. 


R«iv>d. 
Bu. 


^^ 




4U.23S 

UM7e 

IS 

UUttS 

ffiSS 

£U.881 


S01,«1I 

SSS,8TS 
100,810 

4UDga 

521,478 
M7;M3 


774.100 

"1 

; So 

1 s 

3 as 

1 00 
1 DO 












^=^=E=E 


U71,700 


S^;;;;;;:::;eee:;:;::::;;:;;;:; 


».7a.too 








S^WIM 


B.7gl,0W 


87,118,100 


3S.8SI),BDa 





FLOUR VALUES. 

AtM2« of pricts ptr barrtl dwing taeh wuh in 1911. 



3 1S#4<I 



8 



PRICES OF WHEAT IN STORE BY SAMPLE AND TO 

GO TO STORE. 

Range of prices for this eereai during taxh week in 1911. 



Janvuy.... 
Fabnuuy.. 
Ifvehl'.'.'.V. 

April.!!!!!! 
May..*///.!! 
June. 

July. .'.'!V. 
August. ... 
September. 

October. .. 
November. 
Deeemlxur. 



« 
18 
20 
27 

S 
10 
17 
24 

8 
10 
17 
24 
81 

7 
14 
21 
28 

6 
12 
10 
20 

2 


16 
23 
30 

7 
14 
21 
28 

4 
11 
18 
26 

1 

8 
16 
22 
29 


18 
20 
27 

8 
10 
17 
24 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



No. 2 

red 

winter. 

In store. 



97W 



102^9 
'87* 9 



• ■ • • • 

90K 



■ • • • • 



102 

• ■ • • « 

95H 

96 

94 

97 

96 

» • • • • 

94H 



No. 4 

red 

winter. 

■unple. 



■ • ■ • • 

98 A 06 

86 S 98! 

86 " 9 98 

88 

'89" 9 90 

85 

85 

85 9 88M 

85 A 88 

82 S 85 

88Hi 86^ 

87 g 88H 

87 

94 

87 ^ 96 
89 A 94 

85 d 96 

81 $ 89 

89 # 92 

82 d 84 
84 § 85 
88H§ 85 

83 § 87 
88Hd 86 
82 & 83K 
77 & 86 
80 § 
80 S 87 
82 A 
75 S 88 

77 § 87H 

78 g 89 
78 ^ 90 
77 g 91 

90 (a 94 
98 g 98 

90 g 94H 

94 ® 97 

98H S lOm 

88 § 98H 
90 d 98 
90 § 92 
90 g 96 
90 A 94 

86 g 94^ 
88 @ 90 

87 g 94 
90 S 92 




No. 8 
red 

winter. 

aero pie. 




98) 

99 

96 

92^1 ^ 
90 

86 d 90 

87 d 88! 
88H 





No. 8 

hard 

winter, 

■ample. 



97 A 106 



84 




No. 8 

aprinc 

aampie. 



97 


a 98 


96 


iioen 


108 


8 104 


»7H 


lioo 


92 


S 97 




96 




98 


87 


9 92 




94 




ii" 


88 


9 90 




90 


■^ 


a is" 


S 97 


96 


S 99 


97 


S 99 


94 


S 99 


98 


i *^ 


92 


S 97 


88H 


S 92 




90 


92 


d 92H 


91 


d 98 




88M 


» • • • • 

90H 


& m" 


88 


i 99 


89H 


§ 100 


92 


SlOOH 


88 


Sl08 


76 


S 106 


81 


§106 


93 


Sl06 


85 


#106 


101 


il!!^ 


101 


102 


Siiot^ 


108 


fiisH 


102 


Sll2 


99 


§108^ 


97H 


Sl06 


94 


§102 


98 


Sl06 


96 


§106 


96 


g 104 


95 


A 102 


97H 


Sl04 


100 


9 101 



9 



WHEAT VALUES. 

Tfie following ta^tU eockibits the highest and lowest prices for {Contract) wheat (cash) 
at Chicago during eaih month from 1879 to 191 It inclusive. 



1879.. 
U80.. 
1881.. 
1888.. 
1888.. 
1884.. 
1886.. 
1886.. 
1887.. 
1888.. 
1880.. 
1800.. 
1801.. 
1808.. 
188S.. 
1804.. 
1806.. 
1806.. 
1807.. 
1808.. 
1890.. 
1000.. 
1001.. 
lOCB.. 
1903.. 
1004.. 
1905.. 
1006.. 
1907.. 
1008.. 
1000.. 
1910.. 
1911.. 



January. 



81H^ 87)4 
14 ^1 SSK 
9b%m 00 

9S%m 04H 
88H^ 96% 

76 ^ 8m 

77 d 843i 

77HS 80H 
75^^ 78H 

98 mozM 

74H<d 78H 

87^^ 96H 

84Vi$ 00^ 

72 ^ 78)4 

50)4<d 63 

48»<d 55 




HH® 76X 
74 & 80V4 
10%^ 79H 
81^^ 93H 
]5hSi 21 
81 H® 90 
71 (^ 75H 
91*4®! 02*4 

03k<^i im 

10^(^1 2796 
92Vi^l 12 



February. 



I 86)4$ 94 

1 ]8)4®1 25 

96)4® 99 

1 16)4^1 32H 

1 034^1 UK 

903i^ 96H 

74)4# 79^ 

78H$ 819i 

72^$ 784 

749i3 769( 

93)4^1 08H 

74)4® 764 

934$ 

72 ® 

544 
494 



974 
91 9( 
75X 
604 
51 » 
_ 71^ 
r24® 764 
95 ®1 08 
69^® 744 
63X® 674 
724® 74^ 
12%& 764 
73li® 804 
86 ®1 10 
1 134®1 24 
79M^ 87 
721i® 87 
d9>4® 99K 
1 074®1 24 
1 n%m 274 
86 ®107 



March. 



» 8896® 964 
1 12 ®1 25% 

084®1 0&% 
1 22 ®1 36 
1 04 

81 4< 

739|( 

75X( 

71li® 804 

71^® 764 
964®1 04% 
764( 
944( 
774< 
724( 

55H(^ 594 

51\i® 554 

69»® 71 

71 ® 76 
1 00 ®1 Ort^ 

66 ® 744 

64 ® 67 

734® 764 

69^® 76 

704® 
884®t 
1 11 ®1 18% 

744® 854 
724® 
«2 ®1 08 

1 13H®1 26H 
1 13 ®1 26 
844®1 02 



75X 
02% 



864 



AprlL 



I 834® 914 

1 054®1 144 
094®1 054 

1 32 ®142 
99 ®1 124 
754® 949i 
774® 91% 
724® 804 
764® 83% 
71 ® 81% 
794® 984 
T74® 90 

1 02 ®1 12% 
764® 854 
704® 88 
574® 63% 
531K® 634 
614® 71 
664® 774 

1 01 ®1 234 
70 ® 764 
64%® 67% 
60)^ 7416 
70 ® 76% 
714® 79 
85!^1 024 
864®1 19% 

774® 914 
74 ® 87 
89 ®1 07 
1 19 ®1 44% 
1 064®! 21 
834®1 04 



May. 




80%®1 00 
99%®1 08 
80 ® 85% 

684( 




87%®1 06 
87 ®I 13% 
804® 9i% 
79 ®t 06 
964® I 11 
264®1 54 
96 ®1 194 
90U®1 06 



June. 



•1 01 4® 1 07 

87 ®10B4 
1 064®1 144 
1 




604 
81 

534® 67 
67 ® 73 
75 ®120 
714® 794 
65X® 874 
654® 774 
714® 7&4 
744® 864 
92 ®1 06 
94 ®1 20 

814® 894 
87 ®1 05 

894®1 12 
29 ®1 60 
97%®1 14 
86 ®103 



7he following table eochibUs the highest and lowest prices for (Contract) wheat (cash) 
at Chicago during eaJch month from 1879 to 1911 y in^usive. 



1879... 
1800... 
1881... 
1888... 
1883... 
1884... 
1886... 
1886... 
1887... 
1888... 
1889 .. 
1800... 
1801... 
1808... 
loiv* . . 
1804... 
1806... 
1806... 
1807... 
1808... 
1800... 
1000... 
1901... 
19QS... 
1009... 
1904... 
1905... 
1906... 
1907... 
1906... 
1000... 
1910... 
1911... 



July. 



904 

794 

71)4 

854 



\ 884®1 044 
864® 964 
1 084®1 28 
126 ®136 

964®1 034 

794® 844 

864r 

73 

67X< 

794® 

76%® 85 

85 ® 94 

84%® 944 

76 ® 80 

644® 664 

604® 584 

614® 714 

544® 624 

684® 78% 

65%® 88 

684® 754 

74 ® 814 
634® 71% 
71*-^ 79 

75 ® 84 

944®1 18 
864®120 

784® 85 
89 ®106H 
844®1 10 
1 064®! M 
984®1 894 
88^1084 



August. 



88%® 884 
864® 904 
19 ®138 
97 ®109 
00 ®1034 
764$ 884 
78 ® 89 
74 ® 78X 
664® 094 
814® 94 
754® 79 
894®1 07% 
86%®1 134 
744" 




94 

774 

094 
814 
89% 

994 
984 
864®1 



September. 



I 86 ®1 064 
874® 954 
1 204®1 41 
974®1 08 
92 
734 
764 
724® 
674® 
90 ®1 

754$ 
954®1 
90%®1 00 

714® 744 
624® 
504® 
554® 
55 ® 
85 ®1 00 
62%® 68 

694® 

724$ 

684® 
70 ® 
744® 



994 

80 

86% 

77 

714 
65 
83 
04% 



69% 
544 
624 
70 



a5Vi$l 

i%® 



754 

794 

71 

95 

98 

22 

95 

79 



78% 

604® 
91^^1 12 
954®1 09 
004®! 15 
95H®1 17 
894®1 18 



October. 



Ill 044®! 214 
92%®1 014 

I 30 ®1 434 
92)4® 97 
894® 964 
70»® 744 
844® 914 
69%® 744 
694® 724 

I 02^®! 174 
77«$ 824 

964®! 084 
924® 99 
694® 74% 
604® 004 
504® 524 
57%$ 614 

654$ 814 

88 ® 07 

62 ® 704 

684® 74% 

714® 774 

66%® 71U 

674® 754 
76%® 88 
L 09%®1 22 
82%® 92V^ 

71 ® ra% 

914®! 22 
974®1 08 
LOS ®1214 
91 4® 1 14 
944®1 17 



November. 



$1 104 
1 
1 



214 

124 
32 

944 
984 
744 
904 
764 
764 



014 

834 
91% 

92 

714® 
8394® 

724$ 
714® 

1 024®! 15 
784® 814 
874®! 014 
914® 96% 
69%® 78 
58%® 63 
514® 564 
55%® 684 
71 ® 944 
86 ® 964 
644$ 694 
65 ® 714 
694® 744 
70 ® 73% 
694® 774 
75%® 864 

!09»®120 
834® 92 
714® 744 
884® 97 
99>4®1 10 

1 034®1 21 
89 4® 1 09 
904®! 



18 



December. 





974$1 064 
76%® 80 

984 
934 
724 

594 

^ 984 
86 ®106 
62^® 70 
64 ® ( 

694® ^ 
73 ® 1 
714® 1 
77%® 87 
004®! 184 
82^® 90 
724® 75 
924®! 12 
064®! !0 
06 ®1284 
90 ®110 
91H®! 10 



CORN AND OATS. 

Rteeipts and shiptiunts of thtst certals during 1911 , by routes. 





Com. 


Oais. 




i^.-. 


n^- 


ReoaTSd. 
Bu. 


^JT 






inlMO 
:ot,soa 

SU.390 
1.M0 








!S 

90 
10 
90 

00 

so 

i 


1 i 
1 I 

i 00 

oo 
1 00 

1 00 
1 00 


























181.190 
40S.47S 
























fl.900 










71,000 


















M.OW,80II 













CORN AND OATS. 

Rtciipts and shiptMnts of Ikest'eereals during 1911, by numlks. 





COBW. 


OiW. 




a^™,. 


Sbj^. 


KeoHTed. 
Bu. 


^sr'- 




4 90 
t DO 

1 1 


s so 
a oo 

1 i 

1 i 


■i i 

! i 






















































lOa.590.900 


8T.B3O.M0 


H0M.800 









PRICES OF CORN AND OATS. 

Cask prices of thtsi CBrgals for each iii«fe during 1911. 



12 



GQ 



o 






00 



w 
» 



^ .s 



wm 

i 

B 

O 

s 



a 



Ki 

I 

O 



a 






9 



9 



9S 



< 









o 



9 

a 








a5« 



:*!a?af 












lO 


























;j^;j^:f :#!*«« afiR afj^^aeaf :*?8:«a!!;»*:«a? »ea5:at!;»* :« 























:«;« ^«::R:f5R:R;)R » :«iR iR:R ;R;!fr5R af«afa5iR;*;*fae:s» :« » » 

5 ^ *i 35 "^ "* ^ "^ CO » « « '<*« M eg 55 M ?i >5 ft -^ 5^ 'i <3 S <9 ^ 



xteaoaoaQooxaOaBsaoSaoaOaSSooBaosS 



Il 



SPRING WHEAT FLOUR, SPRING 

Oomparative staUment showing the current auh pricet of thete products in the Chicago 

SPRING WHEAT FLOUR, PER BARREL. 

acx>d to choice wimples. 



Febiuarr... 

Agra. '..'.'.','." 

M»y'.;::":::: 

September... 

October 

Movember. . . 
Decembec . . . 



4 1II@G» 
4 1035 TB 
4 WHg&AO 



soa@fl BS 
3 0&saau 



SPUING WHEAT, PER BUSHEL. 



Februiir; . 
Apiii'..:!'! 

uiki'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 
June!!"!! 
July.!!!!!. 
August . . . 
September 
Octoiioc. . . 
November 
Decombec. 1 



87«® f 

00 Si E 

87 a ( 

B8k® f 



) ®l ID jl in m UH 1 



7»iii/l IB^ 



kl WmSil .... 

b 1 18 ««I l>i>i 

)« I II ®l 13K 

^ I lOHGtl Ilii 

>4i 14 ®i is;.;. 

10! Al 03h 
104 m 06 
1 II li%l 13 

124 i»i se 



Qi@l 05 

m 1^1 01 
M® w 
951® 07 



I »4®l 07 
t nt! @1 124 

1 10 m 13 

1 OB CH 11 
■ IS (Pil 10 



WHEAT, CORN AND OATS. 

Jlariet on &tjhrit and abOemth dayt of each monA for seven yaars. 
CORIS, FEB BUSHEL. 





lote. 

Ooatract. 


i«oe. 

ContrBot. 


IWT. 
Oontnct. 


CoDtraot. 


im. 

Oootraut. 


IBIO. 
Oantcoct. 


IBU. 
Contrut. 


- 


:::: S" 
:::: SS 

:::: S5 
::.; |« 

y 


.... 42 
m4®64V 


13 


h 
1 




1 i» 
li liJ 

I F 








'"*'T^:;::::i 










"w , 










Jniy 


1 






Septembet 


October 


Norembep 


•^i^'-y:. 


ui ara 







OATS, PER BUSHEL. 



Contnol. Contract. Coutr&ot. Coot 



I. OoatiBCt. CoDtr&ct. 



February.. -- 

Msrcb."::"'. 

kvm'.'"."'." 

lus :.::::::. 

Jnly. !.'.'.'• "i- 
Beptember . . 
MoTember... 



.... 2BK 
.... iWK 
.... sag 



!!!: Bs* 



4i^@4£H 



16 



RYE AND BARLEY. 

Receipts and shipments of these cereals during 1911 ^^^ routes. 



Lake 

Chieago, Indiana A Southern Railroad 

Chicajso A North- Western Hailvray 

Illinois Central Riulroad 

Chicago, Rock Island A Pacific Railway 

Chicago, Burlington A Quincy Railroad 

Chicago A Alton Railroad 

Chicago A Eastern Illinois Railroad 

Chicago, Milwaukee A St. Paul Railway. 

Wabash Railroad (west of Chicago) 

Chicago Great Western Railroad 

Atchison, Topeka A Santa Fe Railway 

HinneapoUa, St. Paul A Sanlt Ste. Marie RaQway. 

iSl^n. Joliet A Eastern Railway 

Chicago, lodianapolis A Louisville Railway 

Elastern Lines 



Rtb. 



Received. 
Bu. 



Shipped. 
Bu. 



Bablbt. 



Received. 
Bu. 



Shipped. 
Bu* 



22.000 

403.000 

58.700 

58.000 

157.600 

23.000 

6.000 

6S3.000 

6.000 

289.000 

6.000 

26.000 

6.000 

40.000 

9,000 



2,900 
3,800 
1.000 
1,000 



16,000 



6,700 
796,100 



13.500 

8.367.900 

294.000 

2.494,200 

1.689.000 

84,000 

8,000 

7,111.500 

22.500 

2,803.000 

76.600 

272,100 

4,600 

12,000 

104,400 



Totals.. 



1,790,200 



823,600 



23,842,100 



4,700 

116.600 

2.300 

3,000 



26,600 
89,300 



1,600 



2.700 
6,697,400 



6,892.000 



RYE AND BARLEY. 

Receipts and shipments of these cereals during 1911 ^ by months. 





Ry«. 


Bart.kt. 




Received. 
Bu. 


Shipped. 
Bu. 


Received. 
Bu. 


Shipped. 
Bu. 


jAnuArv m • 


106.600 

100,000 

129,500 

67.000 

57.500 

46.500 

63.200 

174,000 

293,000 

329,600 

266.000 

179,600 


129.600 

113.000 

39.000 

35.700 

16.000 

8,200 

23.300 

17.400 

116,900 

133.000 

112.200 

80,800 


2.048.500 
1.601.000 
1,981.100 
1.269.800 
1.243.600 
766 000 
630.000 
1.188,000 
8,340,600 
3.888,600 
3.215.600 
2.280.300 


1.036.600 


Pehniarv ,.-..»- t ^ » t - - 


648,200 


March • 


006.400 


Anril «.. 


466,000 


May 


847,700 


June .........«•.•.«.<•.. 


880^800 


July 


126,800 


A lurimt 


217,800 


SeDtember 


806,700 


October 


664.400 


November 


234,800 


T)incember ^ , , r , r -r 


429.300 






Totals. 


1.790,200 


823,600 


23,343,100 


6,802,000 







RYE AND BARLEY. 

v and by sample, of lh«se ctrtals dttring each week ti 



Choiuit 



pood Dmlt- 






Norambar 



tm 



•^ 



'b a 81 

Ft S to 



FLOUR AND GRAIN. 

Tht faUovnng shows th* aggr*gat« annual rtetipts of flour and grain of aU. kinds, in 
Chicago; also tht quantity of flour manufaeturtd in ttu city for rack year sine* 
ISSS: 



1» 

FLOUR AND GRAIN. 

ThtfoUotoing table shews Ike aggregate annual shifmerU of flour and alt kinds s^ 
grain sine* the incorporation of Chicago, as a etty, to the present time, compiled 
from the most authentic sources : 





Br"' 


Wheal. 


b"' 


OBU. 
Bu. 


K- 


Barler- 


ToUlB, 
flour raduMd 

tobu. 


IB88 




7B 










_ 


























II 




































i 

il 
i,ag 

1 
i 

t.Bm.000 

a-s 

lis 




















is 

i 
i 

so 

i 
1 

i 

i 

i 

i 
i 

s 

07 

■ 1 

TB.si4.ese 

7R,823.1I» 
871930,000 








ISk^ 




1 

i 

g 

i 
i 

se 

80 

1 

84 

i 

83 
03 

1 

80 

1 

139 
OS 

04 

i 

'to 

1 

77:^:600 










3i5w!4^ 


JW1.T« 










i'S&Mi 








£w:S 






















S 

-""94 

s 

or 

i 

1 
. i 

80 

i 

i 
1 

08 

,567,273 

'oisiami 

40»^40a 
8Z3JH» 














sS 














Si 




































^ 
















JS:::; ;::::; :: 




























aS■■■■■;:;:;;■ 


iSSrlw 














JS 


i^S-^ 








20S,BS4.40t 






iS 
ass 


|e:;::v;; 




i 


874.0»7 
B21,3B7 
190,708 

waisi 

13;! MM 

MS. 


218.862,238 


ffi::;;;;;:::;: 


gffilS 


mC".'.'.'.'."'. 


gjass 



20 



GRAIN IN STORE IN CHICAGO DURING 1910. 



Statement of thtfoUotoi'ng certaU in store in Chicago veekly, during 1910, at 
reported by the StaU Begistrar. 



HMCh... 















































































i 

SJMO 


,i 

4.0IS 














































































il 











fi.3(UI.MS 
8,402.321 
&08§,«M 



T,ti7.isa 

7.7TO7S1 
7,B30.ffiS 

flJ3».Wt 

0.102. tM 

t.aT.tso 

8.WT.1M 

■ijnou 

7,W5,3M 
S,4(lt.T3S 
£.U)>.S«S 
6.<S*.SK 

a.i<».i« 

&.G17,SI8 

J mm 
aiaaiii 



E.»8.3I« 
B.MIl3aO 
IMML4(n 
llHL4a( 
111W.I01 
KfnSGS 
l<.5l«;m 

11,914,814 
lS.S31.7a 
IMTHlSSI 

lUiijsa 
ii.3ra,«i 

IXIMSIT 
1I.0S4.SM 

ILSSSiU 
11.107.744 

ii.7M;n7 

ll.ia.9T7 

i?,79un« 
iun.tn 



21 



GRAIN IN STORE IN CHICAGO DURING 1911. 



Slaumtnt of Ik* foUowing ctrtaU in stot 






"sr- 


"^s- 


OMl. 


% 


"-S" 


''is:- 




i 

18 

11 

18 
U 

4 

3t 

i 
1 

U 

I 

1 
1! 

K 

.1 
n 

• 
1 

18 

1 
I 


s 
i 

18 

1 

M 
U 

I 

n 

I 

!? 

90 
IS 

E 
i 

M 

I 
I 

i 

90 


i 

og 
u 

M 

1 

48 

iS 

u 

10 

og 

i 
I 

00 
00 

00 
00 

:; 

00 

oo 
oo 
oo 
oo 
oo 

00 
DO 
00 

I 
I 


i 

i 
a 

i 

i 

i 

00 

i 
I 

00 

00 
00 
DO 
00 
DO 
00 
00 
00 


lis 

i 




























































































































































































lono 


i 

E 

■00 

no 

SI 

100 
100 

S! 

100 
100 

m 

100 

m 

100 

S! 

m 
■» 














Jffl 

i 

i 

T.OOO 

s 

2E.0OO 
71^000 

,s 

I1K.0OO 

































































































FLOUE AND GRAIN 



Wttkly Ttctipts of tktst prodtteti in Chitago during 1911, <u posUd o\ 
bulletin of fh4 Exehangt. 



IW.OH 
1M.B93 
108.101 

87.»&3 
1QS.T2S 
102.241 
3li.U3 
13.NZ 
98,170 

8s.eos 

100.3M 
10S.0T1 
107.4W 
101.B«8 
M.030 
lit. ISO 
10!.42g 
1M.313 



FLOUR AND GRAIN. 



WtMy shipmtnts of tkts4 produett Jtom Chicago during ISit, as posud on th* 
btUUtin of Ik* Exckang*. 





t3.11B 


1 


sss 


J8 


gs^ 


















































i 


113,748 








































































AW7 




1)0.010 


























































iu 





00 


B,3O0 


































































00 








































s 






















































































M.eao 






i,o>i,<wa 





24 



VISIBLE SUPPLY OF GRAIN IN 1910. 

Statm»eiU of the vxddy ttoeka of ffrain in regaJarly authorized wxreKouee* at promi- 
nent grain, centers of the United States, excepting California; indnding the 
quantities afloat on the lakes and the Eiie Canal, presenting the vitibU supply 
of grain in Ike United Slates, not disposed of toith r^erence to uitimote des- 
tination; (nU easily obtainable lo inAuence the mortet* or to supply any 
unexpected demand. 





Wheat. 


«■ 


%•■ 


X: 


"£• 


Totals. 




k 

I 

L 

M 

1! 

1 

'i 


00 

s 

00 

130 
00 
00 

i: 

00 

130 
00 
00 

!! 

Ob 
00 

00 
00 

00 
00 

00 

00 
00 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

i! 

i 
i 

i 

00 


SI 

DO 

!i 

DO 
DO 
00 
00 
DO 

oo 

00 

DO 
DO 
OO 
00 
DO 
00 
DO 
00 
DO 

ii 

DO 
DO 
00 
DO 
00 
DO 
00 

!S 

DO 

s 

00 

oo 

DO 

DO 
OO 
DO 
00 
DO 

ii 

DO 


n 

I 

I 

i 
i 

i 

DO 

i 
i 

i 

I 

DO 

Z 


00 
00 

oo 

00 

oo 

DO 
00 

oo 

DO 
OO 
DO 

!S 

DO 

!S 
!S 

DO 
DO 

iS 

OO 

iS 

00 

DO 
00 
OO 
OO 

is 

00 

!! 

00 

DO 
00 
00 
00 

i! 

DO 

i 

00 
00 


DO 
DO 

DO 

» 

DO 

ii 

DO 

ii 
I 

DO 

DO 
DO 

E 

DO 

DO 
DO 
DO 
DO 
DO 

DO 
DO 
OO 
DO 

S 
























March:"::""".":! 

















M«y. ::::.::::::::':::: 
























July 












..-^ 












. 













































2S 



VISIBLE SUPPLY OP GRAIN IN 1911. 

Statement 0/ the vxekly aloeka of grain in loarehouee* at prominent grain centers 
of Vts United States, aseepting California; including lAe qwuilUia afloat on 
tAe loibea and tAe Brie Camd, preaerUing the visile supply of grain in tht 
United States, not disposed of ^rrith Ttferenee to ultimate destiniUion; but 
easib/ odtoiiutble to influence the mirketa or to atipply ant; unexpected demand. 













00 








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































s 










































m 









ILlMiiudBi 



26 
VISIBLE SUPPLY OF GRAIN. 

SUOement of the stocks of grain on ihe first of each month in regularly andhorisud ware* 
houses at prominent grain centers of Vie United Stales and Canada^ exoqptivng 
Calif omia; including the quantities afloat on the lakes and ihe Ihie Canalt prs' 
senting ihe visible supply of grain in ihe United States and Canada not disposed 
of foOh reference to ultimate destination ; but easily obtainable to it\fliuenoe the 
markets or to supply any unexpected demand. 





Wheat. 
Bu. 


Ck)m. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 




Wheat. 
Bu. 


Corn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 


Jaouary 

February .... 

March 

April 


44,282,000 
42,268,000 
41,472.000 
84,168,000 
27,606,000 
25,909,000 


5,099.000 
8,068,000 
12.348,000 
11,166000 
7,047,000 
8.888,000 


16.267,000 
15,997,000 
15,769,000 
13.129.000 
10,650,000 
8,125,000 


July 

••August..... 
September. 
October.... 
November. 
December.. 


23,86.3,000 
41,816,000 
48,057,000 
62,700,000 
63,618,000 
69,307.000 


7.482000 

7,ioaooo 

6,7:54,000 
6,839.000 
2.527.000 
1,601,000 


9,570,000 
11>OB.OOO 
20,742,000 
21,044,000 
22,600,000 
20,681,000 


May 

June 











*1910, 










Wheat. 
Bu. 


Oorn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 




Wheat. 
Bu. 


Corn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 


January 


27,788,000 
26,468.000 
25,515.000 
29.013,000 
26,228,000 
20,132,000 


8,465,000 

9,764,000 

13.480,000 

13.778,000 

10.603.0(K) 

5,490.000 


11,180,000 
8J60.0(!0 
8,689.000 
9.916.000 
9.ifi!3.000 
6,905.000 


July 


12,081,000 
12,875,000 
34.997,000 
34,967,000 
40.120.000 
42.485,000 


5.146.000 
8,770,000 
2.157.000 
5.011.000 
8.510,000 
1,461,000 


4,245,000 


February 

March 


AUflTUSt. 

September .. 

October 

November... 
December . . . 


2,761.000 
12.551,000 


April 

May 


18,802,000 
17,028.000 


June 


15,502,000 









*1909. 










Wheat. 
Bu. 


Corn. 
Bu. 


Oats, 
Bu. 




Wheat. 
Bu. 


Oorn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 


January 


51.758,000 
44.875.000 
88.213.000 
36,142.000 
29,635.000 
19,786.000 


7,165.000 
6,467,000 
6,254.000 
6.938.000 
3.601,000 
2,841,000 


10,629,000 
10.116,000 
0,026,000 
9.062,000 
8,008.000 
7,468,000 


July 


9.766.000 

7,009.000 

8.862,000 

19,442,000 

27,001,000 

29,417,000 


8,288,000 
2,705,000 
1,778,000 
3,365,000 
2,668,000 
8,289,000 


6JiSl,000 


February 

March 

April 


August 

September... 

October 

November... 
December . . . 


3,800,000 

5,183,000 

12.790.000 


May 


13,264,000 


June 


18.586.000 













1908. 










Wheat. 
Bu. 


Oorn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 




Wheat. 
Bu. 


Oorn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 


January 


48.481,000 
46,711,000 
43,906,000 
38,087.000 
90,818.000 
33,818,000 


4,482,000 
6,542,000 
8,756,000 
5.989.000 
5,016,000 
4,796,000 


8,450,000 
9,534,000 
8,629,000 
10,006.000 
9,086.000 
8.385,000 


July 


15.369,000 
16,174,000 
16.397,000 
29.924,000 
48,063,000 
48,973,000 


3,250,000 
2.078,000 
1.066,000 
8,S^,000 
1,231.000 
2,651,000 


8,731,000 


February 

March 

April 


August 

September... 

October 

November. .. 
December . . . 


1,680.000 
3325,000 
6,629,000 


May 


9.601.000 


June 


8.604.000 







1907. 





Wheat. 
Bu. 


Corn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 




Wheat. 
Bu. 


Oorn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 


January 


45.768.000 
44.857.000 
44,884,000 
47,308,000 
51,999,000 
49,729,000 


5,823.000 
7.314,000 
11,102.000 
11,977,000 
8.102,000 
5,695,000 


12365,000 
11,848.000 
10.904.000 
9.306.000 
10,197,000 
10,605,000 


July 


46,539,000 
48,318,000 
49,469,000 
43,750,000 
43,683,000 
43,477,000 


8,694,000 
7,566,000 
8,894,000 
8,796,000 
8,861,000 
2,585,000 


7,230,000 


February 

March 

April 


August 

September... 

October 

November . . . 
December ... 


2,760,000 
1,908,000 
5,407,000 
7,579,000 
7,280,000 


May 


June 





•United States exclusively. 
.* rlkf'^'' ASi?-J^ ^^' ^^ itatement includes stocks at Omaha, and also private elevator stoeka 
at Chicago. St. Louis and Buffalo, not before included. 



27 



VISIBLE SUPPLY OF GRAIN— CoiminmD. 



1906. 





Wheat. 
Bu. 


Com. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 




Wheat. 
Bu. 


Com. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 


January 


45,883.000 
48,537,000 
47,283,000 
46,468,000 
38,431,000 
30,811,000 


12,819,000 
14,850,000 
16,208,000 
11,801,000 
3.881,000 
3,370,000 


27.519.000 
26.655,000 
24,451,000 
21,332,000 
14,967.000 
8,976,000 


July 


25,802,000 
29,864.000 
30,064.000 
33,352,000 
87.972,000 
41,557,000 


6,059,000 
4.3,18,000 
2,258,000 
4,178,000 
3,750,000 
2,910,000 


6,466.000 


February 

March..:... .. 
April 


August 

September. . . 

October 

November . . . 
December.... 


4,696,000 
7,043,000 
8,833,000 


May 


9,800.000 


June 


12,455,000 



1905, 





Wheat. 
Bu. 


Corn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 




Wheat. 
Bu. 


Corn. 
Bu. 


Oats 
Bu. 


January 


40,619,000 
30,387,000 
86.528,000 
82,327,0(10 
28.529,000 
20.034,000 


9,577,000 
11,682,000 
8,524,000 
8,790,000 
9.981,000 
4.558,000 


22,882,000 
18,888,000 
16,723.000 
16,312,000 
13,857.000 
7,744,000 


July 


14,274,000 
13.354,000 
12.140.000 
17.8Wi.000 
28.;«9,000 
36,943.000 


8,660,000 
5,810,000 
4.615,000 
5.774,000 
3,4.56,000 
6,892,000 


7.221,000 


February 

March..: 


August. 

September... 

October 

November . . . 
December .. . . 


4.805,000 
11.046,000 


April 


18,876,000 


May 

June. 


26,577,000 
28,142.000 













190J^. 










Wheat. 
Bu. 


Com. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 




Wheat. 
Bu. 


Corn. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 


January 

February 

March 


38,204,000 

39,760,000 

35,500,000 

31,727,000 

30,857,000 

21,575,000 


5.783,000 
7.100,000 
8,7ft<,000 
0,670,000 
7,830,000 
3,740,000 


8,508,000 
8,446,000 
10.21.3,000 
10,404,000 
0,100,000 
5,738,000 


July 

August. 

September .. 

October 

November.. . . 
December . . . 


14,055,000 
18,093,000 
12.814,000 
17,576,000 
26,495,000 
36,860,000 


6,277,000 
5.849,000 
8,934,000 
5.979,000 
3.049.000 
8,181,000 


4,346,000 
2,681,000 
9,606,000 


April 

May 


20,015.000 
28,900.000 


June 


24.407 jOOO 













190S. 










Wheat. 
Bu. 


Com. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 




Wheat. 
Bu. 


Corn. 
Bu. 


Oats 
Bu. 


January 


40,738,000 
48,447,000 
47,807.000 
41,058,000 
88,456,000 
24.528.000 


6,684,000 
8,200,000 
10,210.000 
0,841,000 
6,450,000 
4,886,000 


4.804.000 
4,080,000 
6.708,000 
7.340,000 
6,226,000 
4,802,000 


July 


15^0,000 
13,414,000 
13,208,000 
10,480,000 
22,216,000 
30.140.000 


7,218,000 
6,002,000 
5,888,000 
0,090,000 
7,3:«.000 
5,867,000 


4,354,000 


February 

March 


August 

September. . . 

October 

November . . . 
December 


6,483,000 
6,096,000 


April 


6,458,000 


May.::...::... 


8,979,000 


June 


9.584.000 









CONTRACT WHEAT IN STORE AT CHICAGO. 

The following table shows the amount of contract wheat in store at Chicago on the first 

of each month for a series of years. 



January . . 
February . 
March .... 
April 

MV 

June 

July 

August ... 

September 

October... 

November 

December 



1911. 


1910. 


1900. 


1008. 


1907. 


1906. 


6,819,000 


3,133,000 


5,077,671 


6,620,472 


9,672,375 


5,540,416 


4,958,000 


2,513,000 


4,501,604 


5,305,787 


9,622,858 


5,280,897 


4.814.000 


2,221,000 


3,052.318 


4,408,313 


9,472.244 


4,588.307 


4.912,000 


1.875,000 


4,540,740 


3,745.113 


9,309,790 


4,081,896 


4.810,000 


1.638.000 


3.454,436 


8,260,211 


9,106,818 


3,088.168 


6.851,000 


3.539,000 


3,147,028 


8,661,025 


8,868,260 


3,062,648 


8.232,000 


1,324,000 


894.000 


8,134,824 


8.719.405 


2.253.975 


11.376,800 


2.336.000 


057.150 


2,678.000 


8,433,420 


4,005,257 


12,542,000 


6,460,000 


472.443 


2,770,378 


12,080,000 


8.871,011 


11,607,000 


6,012,000 


768,875 


8,640,868 


11,464,674 


8,961,952 


11,396,000 


5,669.000 


1,278,086 


4,111,058 


7,976,985 


8,866,083 


10.683.000 


5,460,000 


1,607,020 


4,860,278 


64905,190 


8,520,031 



28 
GRAIN INSPECTION. 



Rules Governing the Inspection of Grain in the State of Illinois. 



In Forcb On and After Novbmbbr 19, 1909. 



The following are the rules adopted by the Board of Railroad and Warehouse 
Commissioners, establishing a proper number and standard of grades for the 
Inspection of Grain, as revised by them; the same to take effect on and after the 
19th day of November, 1909, in lieu of all rules on the same subject heretofore 
existing: Orvillb F. Berry, Chairman, Carthage, 111. 1 

Bernard A. Bckhart, Chicago, 111. \ Commissioners 

Jambs A. Willoughby, Belleville, 111. J 



RULE I— WINTER WHEAT. 

No. 1 Whitb Winter Wheat shall include all varieties of pure soft white 
winter wheat, sound, plump, dry, sweet and clean, and weigh not less than 58 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 White Winter Wheat shall include all varieties of soft white winter 
wheat, dry, sound and clean, and shall not contain more than 8 per cent of soft 
red winter wheat, and weigh not less than 57 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 White Winter Wheat shall inclu<fe all varieties of soft white winter 
wheat. It may contain 5 per cent of damaged grains other than skin-burnt 
wheat, and may contain 10 per cent of soft red winter wheat, and weigh not less 
than 53 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 White Winter Wheat shall include all varieties of soft white winter 
wheat not fit for a higher grade in consequence of being poor quality, damp, 
musty or dirty, and shall not contain more than 10 per cent of soft red winter 
wheat, and wei gh not less than 50 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 1 Red Winter Wheat shall be pure soft red winter wheat of either or 
both light and dark colors, sound, sweet, plump and well cleaned, and weigh not 
less than 60 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Red Winter Wheat shall be soft red winter wheat of either or both 
light and dark colors, sound, sweet and clean, shall not contain more than 5 per 
cent of white winter wheat, and weigh not less than 58 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 3 Red Winter Wheat shall be sound, soft red winter wheat of either or 
both light and dark colors, not clean or plump enough for No. 2, shsill not contain 
more than 8 per cent of white winter wheat, and weigh not less than 55 pounds 
to the measured bushel. 

"^No. 4 Red Winter Wheat shall be soft red winter wheat of either or both 
light and dark colors, shall contain not more than 8 per cent of white winter 
wheat. It may be damp, musty or dirty, but must be cool, and weigh not less 
than 50 pounds to the measured bushel. 

"St No. 1 Hard Winter Wheat shall include all varieties of pure, hard winter 
wheat, sound, plump, dry, sweet and well cleaned, and weigh not less than 61 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Hard Winter Wheat shall include all varieties of hard winter wheat 
of either or both light and dark colors, dry, sound, sweet and clean, and may 
contain not more than 25 per cent of soft red winter wheat, and weigh not less 
than 59 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Hard Winter Wheat shall include all varieties of hard winter wheat 
of either or both light and dark colors, not clean or plump enough for No. 2, and 
may contain not more than 25 per cent of soft red winter wheat, and weigh not 
less than 56 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Hard Winter Wheat shall include all varieties of hard winter wheat of 
either or both light and dark colors. It may be damp, musty or dirty, andjmay 
contain not more than 25 per cent of soft red winter wheat, and weigh not less 
than 50 pounds to the measured bushel. 



29 

RULE II— SPRING WHEAT. 

No. 1 Hard Spring Wheat shall be sotind, bright, sweet, clean, and consist 
of over 50 per cent of the hard Scotch Fife, and weigh not less than 58 pounds to 
the measured bushel. 

No. 1 Northern Spring Wheat must be Northern grown spring wheat, 
sound, clean and of ^ood milling quality, and must contain not less than 50 per 
cent of the hard varieties of spring wheat, and weigh not less than 57 3^ pounds 
to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Northern Spring Wheat shall be Northern grown spring wheat, not 
dean or sotmd enough for No. 1, and must contain not less than 50 per cent of 
the hard varieties of spring wheat, and weigh not less than 56 poimds to the 
measured bushel. 

No. 3 Northern Spring Wheat shall be composed of inferior, shrunken 
Northern grown spring wheat, and must contain not less than 50 per cent of the 
hard varieties of spring wheat, and weigh not less than 54 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 4 Northern Spring Wheat shall include all inferior Northern grown 
spring wheat that is hsLdly shrunken or damaged, and must contain not less than 
50 per cent of the hard varieties of spring wheat, and weigh not less than 49 pounds 
to the measured bushel. 

No. 1 Spring Wheat shall be sound, plump and well cleaned and weigh no 
less than 59 poimds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Spring Wheat shall be sotmd, clean, of a good milling quality, and 
weieh not less than 57^ pounds to the measured bushel. 

Mo. 3 Spring Wheat shall include all inferior, shrunken or dirty spring wheat, 
and weigh not less than 53 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Spring Wheat shall include all spring wheat, damp, musty, grown, 
badly bleached, or from any cause which renders it unfit for No. 3, and weigh not 
less than 49 pounds to the measured bushel. 

White Spring Wheat — ^The grades of Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 White Spring Wheat 
shall correspond with the grades of Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 Spring Wheat, except that 
thev shall be of the white variety. 

No. 1 Durum Wheat shall be bright, sound, dry, well cleaned and be com- 
posed of durum, commonly known as macaroni wheat, and weigh not less than 
60 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Durum Wheat shall be dry, clean and of good milling quality. It shall 
include all durum wheat that for any reason is not suitable for No. 1 durum, and 
weigh not less than 58 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Durum Wheat shall Include all durum wheat bleached, shrunken, or 
for any cause unfit for No. 2, and weigh not less than 55 pounds to the meastired 
bushel. 

No. 4 Durum Wheat shall include all durum wheat that is badly bleached 
or for any cause unfit for No. 3, and weigh not less than 50 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 1 Velvet Chaff Wheat shall be bright, sound, and well cleaned, and 
weigh not less than 61 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Velvet Chaff Wheat shall be sotmd, dry, clean, may be slightly bleached 
or shrunken, but not good enough for No. 1, ana weigh not less than 59 pounds 
to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Velvet Chaff Wheat shall include all wheat that is bleached, smutty, 
or for anv other cause unfit for No. 2, and weigh not less than 55 pounds to the 
measured bushel. 

No. 4 Velvet Chaff Wheat shaU include all wheat that is very smutty, 
badly bleached and grown, or for any other cause unfit for No. 3, and weigh not 
less than 50 pounds to the measured bushel. 

' RULE III— PACIFIC COAST WHEAT. 

No. 1 Pacific Coast Red Wheat shall be dry, sound, dean and free from 
smut, and weigh not less than 59 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Pacific Coast Red Wheat shall be dry, sound, clean and may be slightly 
tainted with smut and alkali and weigh not less than 58 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 



30 

No. 3 Pacific Coast Red Wheat shall include all other Pacific Coast red 
wheat. It may be smutty or musty, or from any other reason unfit for milling 
purposes, and weigh not less than 54 pounds to the measured bushel. 

Note. — Pacific Coast White Wheat shall be graded according to the rules for 
Pacific Coast Red Wheat. In case of a mixture of Pacific Coast wheat with our 
home grown wheat, red or white, such mixture shall be graded "Pacific Coast 
Mixed Wheat." 

Note. — The grades of Pacific Coast White and Pacific Coast Red Wheat are 
to include all such wheat that is grown in the extreme Northwest and on the 
Pacific slope from either spring or winter seeding. 

RULE IV— MIXED WHEAT 

Mixed Wheat — In case of an appreciable mixture of hard^nd soft wheat, 
red and white wheat (except as provided in the rule of hard winter, red winter, 
white winter and Northern spring wheat), durum and spring wheat, any of them 
with each other, it shall be graded according to the quality thereof, ana the kind 
of wheat predominating shall be classed as Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 mixed wheat, and 
the inspector shall make notation describing its character. 

RULE V— CORN. 

The following maximum limits shall govern all inspection and grading of corn 

Percentage 

cob-rotten. 

Exclusive of 

Percentage bin burnt or Percentage 

of mahogany dirt and broken 

Grade. moisture. com. grains. 

1 15 1 1 

2 16 5 2 

3 19 10 4 

4 22 See No. 4 com 

mle, all colors. 

No. 1 White Corn shall be 99 per cent white, sweet and well matured. 

No. 2 White Corn shall be 98 per cent white and sweet. 

No. 3 White Corn shall be 98 per cent white and sweet. 

No. 4 White Corn shall be 98 per cent white, but shall include damp, damaged 
or musty com. 

No. 1 Yellow Corn shall be 99 per cent yellow, sweet and well matured. 

No. 2 Yellow Corn shall be 95 per cent yellow and sweet. 

No. 3 Yellow Corn shall be 95 per cent yellow and sweet. 

No. 4 Yellow Corn shall be 95 per cent yellow, but shall include damp, 
damaged or musty corn. 

No. 1 Mixed Corn shall be corn of various colors, sweet and well matured. 

No. 2 Mixed Corn shall be com of various colors and sweet. 

No. 3 Mixed Corn shall be com of various colors and sweet. 

No. 4 Mixed Corn shall be com of various colors; but shall include damp, 
damaged or musty com. 

RULE VI— KAFFIR CORN. 

No. 1 White Kaffir Corn shall be pure white of choice quality, sotmd, dry 
and well cleaned. 

No. 2 White Kaffir Corn shall be seven-eighths white, sound, dry and clean. 

No. 3 White Kaffir Corn shall be seven-eighths white, not chy, clean or 
sound enough for No. 2. 

No. 4 White Kaffir Corn shall be seven-eighths white, badly damaged, 
damp, musty or very dirty. 

No. 1 Red Kaffir Corn shall be pure red, of choice quality, sound, dry and 
well cleaned. 

No. 2 Red Kaffir Corn shall be seven-eighths red, sound, dry and clean. 

No. 3 Red Kaffir Corn shall be seven-eighths red, not dry, clean or sound 
enough for No. 2. 



31 

No. 4 Red Kaffir Corn shall be seven-eighths red, badly damaged, damp, 
musty or very dirty. 

No. 1 Kaffir Corn shall be mixed kaffir com of choice quality, sotind, dry 
and well cleaned. 

No. 2 Kaffir Corn shall be mixed kaffir corn, sound, dry and dean. 

No. 3 Kaffir Corn shall be mixed kaffir com, not dry, clean or sound enough 
for No. 2. 

No. 4 Kaffir Corn shall include all mixed kaffir com, badly damaged, damp, 
musty or very dirty. 

RULE VII— MILO-MAIZE. 

No. 1 Milo-Maizb shall be mixed milo-maize of choice quality, sound, dry 
and well cleaned. 

No. 2 Milo-Maizb shall be mixed milo-maize, sotmd, dry and clean. 

No. 3 Milo-Maizb shall be mixed milo-maize, not dry, dean or sotmd enough 
for No. 2. 

No. 4 Milo-Maizb shall indude all mixed milo-maize, badly damaged, damp, 
musty or very dirty. 

RULE VIII— OATS. 

No. 1 Whitb Oats shall be white, dry, sweet, sound, bright, clean, free from 
other grain and weigh not less than 32 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Whitb Oats shall be 96 per cent white, dry, sweet, shall contain not 
more than 1 per cent of dirt, and 1 per cent of other grain and weigh not less than 
29 pounds to the measured bushel. 

Standard Whitb Oats shall be 92 per cent white, dry, sweet, shall not contain 
more than 2 per cent of dirt and 2 per cent of other grain and weigh not less than 
28 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Whitb Oats shall be sweet, 90 per cent white, shall not contain more 
than 3 per cent of dirt and 5 per cent of otJier grain and weigh not less than 24 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Whitb Oats shall be 90 per cent white, may be damp, damaged, musty 
or very dirty. 

NoTB — Yellow Oats shall not be graded higher than No. 3 White Oats. 

No. 1 MiXBD Oats shall be oats of various colors, dry, sweet, sound, bright, 
dean, free from other grain, and weigh not less than 32 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 2 MixBD Oats shall be oats of various colors, dr^, sweet, shall not contain 
more than 2 per cent of dirt and 2 per cent of other gram and weigh not less than 
28 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 MiXBD Oats shall be sweet oats of various colors, shall not contain more 
than 3 per cent of dirt and 5 per cent of other grain and weigh not less than 24 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 MixBD Oats shall be oats of various colors, damp, damaged, musty or 
very dirty. 

No. 1 Rbd Oats or Rust Proof shall be pure red, sound, bright, sweet, clean 
and free from other grain and weigh not less than 32 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 2 Rbd Oats or Rust Proof shall be seven-eighths red, sweet, dry and 
shall not contain more than 2 per cent of dirt or foreign matter, and weigh not 
less than 30 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Rbd Oats or Rust Proof shall be sweet, seven-eighths red, shall not 
contain more than 5 per cent of dirt or foreign matter, and weigh not less than 
24 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Rbd Oats or Rust Proof shall be seven-eighths red, may be damp, 
musty or very dirty. 

No. 1 Whitb Clipped Oats shall be white, clean, dry, sweet, sound, bright, 
free from other grain, and weigh not less than 35 pounds to the measured bu&el. 

No. 2 Whitb Clipped Oats shall be 95 per cent white, dry, sweet, shaU not 
contain more than 2 per cent of dirt or foreign matter, and weigh not less than 
32 pounds to the measured bushel. 



32 

No. 3 White Clipped Oats shall be sweet, 90 per cent white, shall not contain 
more than 5 per cent of dirt or foreign matter, and weigh not less than 30 pounds 
to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 White Clipped Oats shall be 90 per cent white, damp, damaged, musty 
or dirty, and weigh not less than 30 pounds to the measured bushel. 

' No. 1 Mixed Clipped Oats shall be oats of various colors, dry, sweet, sound, 
bright, clean, free from other grain, and weigh not less than 35 pounds to the 
measured biishel. 

No. 2 Mixed Clipped Oats shall be oats of various colors, drv, sweet, shall 
not contain more than 2 per cent of dirt or foreign matter, and weigh not less than 
32 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Mixed Clipped Oats shall be sweet oats of various colors, shall not con- 
tain more than 5 per cent of dirt or foreign matter and weigh not less than 30 
pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Mixed Clipped Oats shall be oats of various colors, damp, damaged, 
musty or dirty and weigh not less than 30 pounds to the measvired bushel. 

Purified Oats — All oats that have been chemically treated or purified shall 
be classed as purified oats, and inspectors shall give the test weight on each car or 
parcel. 

Note — Inspectors are authorized when reouested by shippers to give weight 
per bushel instead of grade on Clipped White Oats and Clipp^ Mixed Oats. 

RULE IX— RYE. 

No. 1 Rye shall be dry, sound, plump, sweet and well cleaned and weigh not 
less than 57 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Rye shall be dry, sound and contain not more than 1 per cent of other 
grain or foreign matter, and weigh not less than 55 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Rye shall include inferior rye not unsound, but from any other cause not 
good enough for No. 2 and weigh not less than 53 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Rye may be damp, musty or dirty, and weigh not less than 50 pounds 
to the measured bushel. 

RULE X— BARLEY. 

No. 1 Barley shall be sound, plump, bright, clean and free from other grain, 
and not scoured nor clipped, shall weigh not less than 48 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 2 Barley shaU be sound, of healthy color (bright or straw color), reasonably 
clean and reasonably free from other grain and seeds, and not scoured nor clipped, 
shall weigh not less than 46 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Barley shall include slightly shrunken or otherwise lightly damaged 
barley, not good enough for No. 2, and not scoured nor dipped, shall weigh not 
less than 44 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Barley shall include barley fit for malting ptirposes, not good enough 
for No. 3. 

No. 1 Peed Barley shall test not less than 40 pounds to the measured bushel, 
shall be cool and reasonably free from other grain and seeds, and not good enough 
for No. 4, and may include barley with a strong ground smell, or a slightly musty 
or bin smell. 

Rejected Barley shall include all barley testing under 40 pounds to the 
measured bushel, or barley which is badly musty or badly damaged, and not 
good enough to grade "feed" barley. 

Bay Brewing Barley. 

Bay Brewing Barley — The grades of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 Bay Brewing Barley 
shall conform in all respects to the grades of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 barley, except that they 
shall be of the Bay Brewing variety, grown in the far West and on the Pacific slope. 

Chevalier Barley. 

Chevalier Barley — The grades of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 Chevalier Barley shall con- 
form in all respects to the grades of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 barley, except that they shall 
be of the Chevalier variety grown in the far West and on the Pacific slope. 

Bay Brewing Mixed Barley. 

Bay Brewing Mixed Barley — In case of admixture of Bay Brewing barley 



33 

with barley of other varieties* it shall be graded according to the quality thereof 
and classed as l-2-33Bay Brewing Mixed Barley. 

Chbvalibr Mixed Barlby. 

Chevalier Mixed Barley — In case of admixture of Chevalier barley with 
barley of other varieties, it shall be graded according to the quality thereof and 
classed as 1-2-3 Chevalier Mixed Barley. 

Winter Barley. 

No. 1 Winter Barley shall be plump,|bright, sound and dean, free from other 
grain, and weigh not less than 48 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Winter Barley shall be sound, plump, may be stained, shall contain 
not more than 3 per cent of foreign matter, and weigh not less than 46 pounds to 
the measured bu^el. 

No. 3 Winter Barley shall include all shrunken, stained and dirty barley, 
shall contain not more than 5 per cent of foreign matter, and weigh not less than 
44 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Winter Barley shall include all barley not fit for a higher grade in con- 
sequence of being poor quality, damp, musty or dirty; shall contain not more 
than 10 per cent of foreign matter and weigh not less than 40 poimds to the meas- 
ured buimel. 

Note. — All barley that has been chemically treated or purified shaU be classed 
as purified barley. 

RULE XI— GENERAL RULES— SAMPLE GRADES. 

All wheat, barley, oats, rye and com that is in a heated condition, souring or 
too damp to be safe for warehousing, or that is badly bin-burnt, fire burnt, fire 
smoked, or badly damaged, mixed with garlic, onions, or containing live weevil, 
exceedingly dirty, or where different kinds of grain are badly mixed with one 
another, shall be classed as Sample Grade, and the Inspector shaU make notations 
as to quality and condition. 

RULE XII— FEES FOR INSPECTION. 

The Chief Inspector op Grain is hereby authorized to collect on all grain 
inspected under his direction as follows: 

For In-Inspbction: 50 cents per car load; 10 cents per wagon or cart load; 60 
cents per 1,000 bushels from boats; one-quarter of a cent per bushel from bags. 

For Out-Inspection: 50 cents per 1,000 bushels, and 10 cents per wagon load 
to teams. 

Note — ^The inspection department shall, in no case, make a grade of grain 
above that of the poorest quality found in any lot of grain inspected, when it has 
evidently been plugged for the purpose of deception, or otnerwise improperly 
loaded. 

Note — Wheat which has been subjected to scouring, or clipping, or any pro- 
cess equivalent thereto, shall not be graded higher than No. 3. 

Note — The department will, in addition to the grading of Spring Wheat, give 
dockage and grade if cleaned. 

Note — The word "NEW" shall be inserted in each certificate of inspection of 
a newly harvested crop of oats until the fifteenth day of August; of rye, until the 
first day of September ; of wheat, until the first day of November, and of barley, 
until the first dav of November of each year. 

This change snail be construed as establishing new grades for the times specified, 
to conform to the existing grades of grain in all particulars (except the distinctions 
hereby established between the new and the old crop), and shall apply to grain 
inspected from store for two months after the time respectively above specified. 

'Note — ^All inspectors shall make their reasons for grading grain, when necessary, 
fully known by notations on their records. The weight alone shall not determine 
the grade. 

Note — All inspectors must ascertain the weight jjer measured bushel of each 
lot of wheat inspected by them and report the same in their records. 

W. S. Cowen, 
Chief Inspector of Grain. 



34 



ADMINISTRATION AND WAREHOUSE 

REGISTRATION. 



Extracts from the Rides Prescribed by the Board of Railroad and Warehouse Com^ 
missioners for the Administration of the Department of Grain Inspection and 
Warehouse Registration in the State of Illinois, and in force from and after 
November 19, 1909. 



Attempts at Fraud or Interfbrbncb. 

All persons employed in the inspection of grain shall promptly report to the 
Chief Inspector in writing all attempts to defraud the system of grain inspection 
established by law, and all instances where warehousemen shall deliver or attempt 
to deliver grain of a lower grade than that called for by the warehouse receipt. 

They shall also, in the same manner, report all attempts of receivers or shippers 
of grain, or any other person interested therein, to instruct or in any improper 
way to influence the action or opinion of any Inspector in the discharge of his 
duty; and the Chief Inspector shall report all such cases to the Commission. 

Extracts from the Laws of Illinois, Revised Statutes, Chapter 114, Section 152. 

"Any duly authorized Inspector of Grain who shall be guilty of neglect of 
duty, or who shall knowingly or carelessly inspect or grade any grain improperly, 
or who shall accept any money or other consideration, directly or indirectly, 
for any neglect of duty, or the improper performance of any duty, as such Inspector 
of Grain, and any person who shall improperly influence any Inspector of Grain 
in the performance of his duties as such Inspector, shall be deemed guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and, on conviction, shall be flned in a sum of not less than $100, 
nor more than $1,000, in the discretion of the Court, or shall be imprisoned in the 
county jail not less than three, nor more than twelve months, or both, in the dis- 
cretion of the Court." 



35 



INSPECTION AND WEIGHING RATES. 

GRAIN (State Iksfsction). 

For in-iimpecting grain from cars, per car 10 60 

For iD-inspecting grain from boats, per M bu 60 

For in-inspecting grain from bags, per bag 00)^ 

For out-inspecting grain to vessels, per M bu 60 

For inspecting grain to cars, per M bu 60 

W. S. CowKN, Chief Inspeetcr. 

Bailroad and toarehmue commissioners^ in charge of grain inspection : 
O^F. Bbbby, Chairman. B. A. Eckhabt. Jambs A. WilxiOUGHBT. 

Secretary cf Commission: 

WlIiLIAM KiLFATBICK. 

Registrar : 
M. A. MuBLLBB, 206 South La Salle Street. 

Committee of appecds on grain inspection : 
J. F. ElENDALL. W. H. Pebikjb. F. W. Hotchkiss 



BOARD OF TRADE DEPARTMENTS. 

Ghrain sampling and seed inspection d^artment: 

Bobbbt p. Kbttles, Chief Ghrain SampUr. 

For sampling grain, per car $0 30 

For sampling grain from warehouse to vessels, per M bu 26 

FLAXSEED. 

Chablbs F. Lias, Chi^ Inspector. 

For inspecting flaxseed received in bulk— for each car-load of one grade. . .fO 76 
For inspecting flaxseed received in bulk— where two or more grades are 

found in the same car— for each grade 60 

For each one thousand bushels from elevator or warehouse to lake trans- 
portation 76 

For each bag lot of 100 bags or under 60 

For each additional bag over 100 bags H 

For each wagon-load* 16X 

No inspection charge less than 60 

* Four waffon-loadi to be counted as equal to 1 oar-load. 



36 



WEIGHING DEPARTMENT. 
H. A. Fobs, WeighmagUr and Custodian. 

WEIGHING CHARGES. 

John A. Tobet, Weigher of paMng-houae fnvdueU, 
H. A. Fobs, Weigher of other CommodUiu. 

Grain, by cargo, from elevator to yessela, per Mbu iO 12 

Grain, by cargo, from vessels to elevators, per M 15 

Grain, from canal-boats, per boat-load 100 

Grain in bulk, at regular transfer stations, per car-load 50 

Flaxseed in bags or bulk, per car, not including handling labor 60 

Grain, seed, beans, potatoes and similar articles in bags, per bag — 02 

Grain, seed, beans, potatoes and similar articles in car lots 02 

Dressed hogs, each 02 

Lard and grease, per package 04 

Tallow, in half hogsheads or smaller packages, per package 04 

Tallow, in hogsheads, per package 10 

Bulk meats, not including labor, per M lbs 10 

For stripping lard or grease at regular warehouse— per package 50 

PROVISION INSPECTION DEPARTMENT. 
John A. Tobby, Chief Inepector and Begietrar. 

For inspecting beef and pork— for the first five barrels, per brl ID 80 

For inspecting beef and pork— for each additional brl 26 

For inspecting 8. P. meats— for the first five tierces, per tc 1 00 

For inspecting S. P. meats— for each additional tc 25 

For inspecting boxed meats— for the first five boxes, per box 1 00 

For inspecting boxed meats— for each additional box 50 

In case (he whole cf the lot is inspected^ not including labor and coopering : 

For inspecting beef and pork, per brl $0 10 

For inspecting S. P. meats— in lots of fifty tierces or more, per tc \2H 

For inspecting S. P. meats— in lots of less than fifty tierces, per tc 15 

For inspecting S. P. meats— in lots of one himdred tierces or more, per tc 10 

For in8i)ecting bulk or boxed meats— in car-load lots or more, per M lbs. . 15 

For inspecting lard— in lots of one hundred tierces or more, per tc 04 

For inspecting tallow and grease, per tc 04 

FLOUR. 
John T. Canvtn, Chief Inepector, 
For inspecting flour, per brl., or its equivalent in sacks 10 02 

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT. 
W. M. Hopkins, Manager, 



37 
GRAIN INSPECTION 

//umber of can insptcted in, by monlki, during 1911. 





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3& 



REGULAR WAREHOUSES. 

Declared Begvlar Warehouses for the storage of grain andjlaxseed, under the rules 

of the Board of l^rade of the City of Chicago and the regulaUons and 

requirements of Us Board of DirectorSf from the date stated 

in margin, until the first day of Juty^ 1912, 



Bogular on 



July 1. 1911 






Aag. 
July 

Aug. 
July 



16, 1911 
1, 1911 

H 

1, 1911 
1, 1911 



Rane of Warehoui*. 



Armour Eleyator, comprising Houses 

A, Band B Annex 

Armour Elevator C 

Oalumet Elevator O 

Ohioago & St. L. Elevator and Annex . 

National Elevator 

J . Bosenbaum Elevator B 

Rock IbI and Elevator A 

Rook lAland Elevator B 

J. Rosenbaum Elevator A 

South Cbl. Elev. C and Annex 

Wabash Elevator 



Operated by 



Armour Grain Oo , 

Armour Grain Oo 

Central Elevator Co 

J. Bosenbaum , 

Central Elevator Co 

J. Bosenbaum , 

J. Bosenbaum , 

J . Bosenbaum 

J. Bosenbaum 

South Chicago Elevator Oo. , 
E. B. Bacon , 



Capacity. 
Bushels. 



5.000,000 

1.000.000 

1.060,000 

2,000,000 

725,000 

1,660,000 

1,250,000 

800,000 

400.000 

3,000,000 

1,600.000 



Total capacity. 



18,276,000 



GRAIN STORAGE RATES FOR 1911. 



storage rates on all grain or flax seed received in bulk and in good condition, shall not 
be In excess of one (l)cent per bushel for the first ten days or part thereof, and one-thirtieth 
(1-30) of one cent per bushel for each additional day thereafter so long as such grain 
or flax seed remains in good condition. 



39 
CHICAGO ELEVATOR WAREHOUSES. 

Th9 following warehouses comprise aU grain warehouses in Chicago except those declared 
regular under the rules of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, 

on January iS7, 1912. 



Nftine of Warahoim. 



Operated by 



Capadty. 
Bueheli. 



Am. linaeed Co. (South Chioago Works) .... 
Am. Linaeed Co. (Wright A HiUs Works). . . 
Am. Malting 0>. (13th and Rockwell Sts.) . . 
Am. Bialting Co. (S2d Ave. and Bloomingdale 

Road) 

Am. Malting Co. (440 Hawthorne Ave.) 

Am. Malting Co. (BUss and EQokory Sts.) . . . 
Am. Bialting Co. (Bliss and Cherry Stn.) .... 

Am. Malting Co. (Kensington) 

Armle A Kirby 

AtUmtic 

Badenoeh Elevator 

B. A. Eekhart Mill. 

Bartlings Elevator 

Belt 



Bullen (Pine St.) 

Bjrmes 

CUumet A 

CUumet B 

Oalnmet Bialting Co 

Central A 

Chicago Dock 

Oiicago db £!rie Transfer.. 

Columbia Malting Go 

Orescent linseea Oil Co. . 

Edwards A Loomis 

FitehbuTg 

Grand Crossing. 

Grand Trunk Western. . . . 

Hayf ord 

Indiana Harbor Elevator. 

Irondale A 

Keelin 



King 

LTC. Huek 

Livingston 

Bfatteson ESevator 



Bfichigan Central A 

Bfiehigan Central B 

Bfinnesota and Annex 

Mueller db Young ....• 

National Bialting. Co 

North-Weetem Slalt A Grain Co . 

North-Westem Yeast Co 

Pennsylvania Transfer 

Range ft Sons 

Rtalto 

RookweU St. Elevator 

Santa Fe 

Santa Fe Annex 

Sehwill Malt House 

South Chicago D 

Standard Elevator 

Star \ Crescent 

Union Elevator and Annex. 

Walthars. 



American linseed Co. 
American Linseed Co. 
American Bialting Co 



American Malting Co , 

American Bialting Co , 

American Malting Co , 

American Malting Co , 

American Malting Co , 

Argile ft Kirby , 

Hooper Grain Go , 

J. J. Badenoeh ft Co , 

B. A. Eekhart Biilltng Gu 

Bartling 

Rosenbaum Bros , 

Geo. Bullen ft Co 

W. J. Byrnes ft Co , 

Calumet Elevator Co , 

Calumet Elevator Co , 

Calumet Malting Co 

Armour Giain Co 

The Albert Dickinson 0> 

Quaker Oats Co 

Columbia Malting Co 

Crescent Linaeed Oil Co 

Edwards ft Loonus Co 

Williams Grain Co 

Frank Q. Ely 

Hooper Grain Co 

Frank Bi&rahi^l , 

Central Elevator Co 

J. Rosenbaum Grun Go , 

Keelin Bros, ft Co 

E. R. Bacon 

KingftCo 

Geo. Bullen ft Go 

livingston ft Co , 

C. L. Dougherty ft Co 

W. H. Merritt ft Go 

F. H. Mealiff ft Son 

F.H.MeaUffftSon 

Armour Grain Co 

Mueller ft Young Grain Co 

National Bialting. Go 

North-Westem Malt ftTGrain Go. 

North-WestemtYeast Co 

Pennsylvama R. R. Go 

J. Range ft Sons 

Nye-Jenks Grain Go 

W. E. Ellis 

Armour Gmin Co 

Armour Grain Co 

A. Sehwill ft Co 

South Chicago Elevator Co 

Standard Grain ft Elevator Co.. 

Star ft Crescent Milling Go 

Armour Grain Co 

Walther ft Go 



Total capacity 



400.000 
100.000 
650.000 

1,000.000 

50.000 

50.000 

500.000 

500.000 

95.000 

150.000 

195.000 

750.000 

75.000 

1.500.000 

1.000.000 

40.000 

1.300.000 

1.500,000 

400.000 

ooaooo 

1.000.000 

90.000 

800.000 

40.000 

26.000 

60,000 

60.000 

110.000 

100.000 

600,000 

1.600.000 

30,000 

1.600.000 

36.000 

600.000 

25.000 

100.000 

760.000 

60,000 

40.000 

1.200,000 

1.260,000 

500.000 

1.000.000 

200.000 

176.000 

80.000 

1.000.000 

126.000 

800.000 

1,000,000 

750.000 

1.000.000 

100.000 

100,000 

3.000.000 

86.000 

28.865,000 



LIVE AUD DRESSED HOGS. 

Beceipta and tihipmenla during 1911, 
(Ut* Bod an raportod by Ui« DoioD Slook Yudi OoJ 



By motOhs during 1911. 



•Hwrnm. 






liTB. 


■"sr"- 




live. 

No. 






No. 


W»^ 






484.90 1 

si 

•78,913 


230 

s 

1 






s 

m.sgs 

131.1M 

Kl 

78.:«Z 
113.078 


SM 




18 


































■^s 






























<% 






















7.10<I.W0 


338 




1JS«,7» 






18 




58.4«e 








ToUl Uvfl Md dfMMd 






7.108 »78 






ijaifix 













*NoTB. — S««ilpH of live hoc* not loeladad in ttis above lUMmait were B( 



CATTLE AND SHEEP. 

Receiptt ami tkipmtnts of Hum varittUt of live ttodk during 1911. 

(A* nported by th> UnioB Sloek Yarda Co.) 



E«cmp«. 






CattU. 


Sheap. 




CalUs. 


Sheep 


Odaago A North- Weatera Ry . 
lUinoia Ceutial R. R 


eu,siT 

SliSSS 

si 

MO,iOT 
flg.M3 

IDOIiSS 
fiTSS 

■a 

S.7M 


'"s ^ 
3 n 

1.1 I 

i3 


Chi oago A North-WeitOTTi R y. 


tl.S4 

1 

itu 

11.M 
U.B33 

s 

98,063 
1BS.0« 

.1 

i,aii,ua 

1,71M79 


g:5S 

IB, 108 

'S 

18,11)0 


Chicago Great Wnrtem R. R. . 
Chicago. Ind. A Lou. Ry.... 


Minn«p.St.P,4S.8.M.Ry. 

Lake Shore A Mich. So. I^. 
KtUbSS^'c'-aASLLiH? 

Chicago JuaotioD Ry. '! i !' ! 
Chicago. ladlaoa A Sou. Ry. 






iSSvJ^^;;; 




2S,3<I7 


iVtS 


«« 










1.911331 


E.Ta«.U4 








tMsti 



CATTLE AND SHEEP. 

Bteeipta and tkipments of iJute varitliet of Uve stode by montht during ISll- 

(Aa raportsd by tbe Union Stock Yaida Co.) 



«„,.. 


SHipiianw. 




Catt... 


Sheep. 




Cattle. 


Sheep. 




340.188 

319 887 


417J77 

aWBis 
teessa 

J7B:09a 

^^To 




111.488 

li 
SIS 

S 

101.748 














































































2,»tl.811 


5,736,344 


i.2i«,ua 

I.71t37fl 











FRESH MEATS AND LARD. 

SecHptt and ^ipme«t» of ihete prod/ads during 191 1, by rvuiu. 





PuuMbam. 


LUD. 




"•gr'- 


s,.^ 


"TbX-- 


SMjji 










inooo 




! 




<I,«(».ZOO 

ai,7M,S00 






■.mioo 

ia,«H.>ao 


su.7oa 












■as 


S.U3,100 














tKS 






1,311,000 

yiuuoo 


,M 
















1.800,000 
(»3:«0 






i'uCmo 


7»i,»«,aoo 








msw.000 


STO,T01<IOO 


ttmjoo 


«afM.m 





FRESH MEATS AND LARD. 

SeceiptaaiidShipme'iaBof these products during 1911, hymonihs. 





Fbuh Mun. 


LUD. 




"isr"- 


*,r* 


ROMivMl. 


SMj^ 




a 00 

1 1 
i! I 

14 00 


71 100 

I I 
1 1 

at no 


11 






















































isai»s,ooa 


STIXTOteoO 


ttmw) 


W2.on.ioo 





43 



HOG PRODUCTS OTHER THAN LARD. 
Beeeipta and ShifmenU of tlieae produeta dwring 1911, by n>ul«s- 





BtmBn.BD Po«. 


Oraim UmAn. 




e™™i 


SU.J-. 


"TbT" 


«^^ 






1.717 

IS 

*,»17 










Wooo 

"as 

U,7W.300 

'SSSiffi 






T,eo> 

'■a 


























IBl 
































■•'^SS 






























ioo 


8B,1M 


MO.S0O 








Ma 


IOS.9lg 


21S.741.S0O 







HOG PRODUCTS OTHER THAN LARD. 

Beedptt arid Shipments of theat products during 1911, hy months- 





B....^.P.„ 


Othm UiAn. 




R«dVBd. 

Brl.. 


nx-- 


R«j^v.d. 


lijr'- 




8I» 


■Iffi 
II 

IIJU 

7,ug 


IE DO 
U 00 

Jl So 

i i 

It 00 










gsss 

42,118.900 
I18.4M.900 






























»S 


ThtKabm 


im 




,.m 


tOCSlJ 


mm.eoo 







CATTLE AND HOG STATISTICS. 



BEEF AND PORK PACKING IN CHICAGO. 

For a ierie» of years. March 1 to March 1. 



I8W-T... 
1877-e... 

878-B.-. 



Numberor Numb; 






1898^.... 
■,894-6.... 

.8(15 e.... 

,8fl6-7.... 
.M7-S.... 
[W8-B,... 

:900-i. ... 

SOl-E.,.. 
IBOB-B.... 

i9(Mr-&!!!! 
iBos-a.... 

1908-7.... 
1907-8.... 
1908-0,... 
1909-10... 
1910-11... 



2,«e7.S£3* 



Number of 



S.H0.410> 

S.7t^SSi* 
«.01fl,«7B« 



45 
POEK PACKING. 



■Enclnde* Cad&by, Wis. tLonlsTilU In the early yeari lacluded JeSeraoiiTlJIe and New Alban;. 

COMPAKATIVB STATEMENT 















1 



•^ 

^ 
-^ 

tz 



"1. 

s 



46 

i^Q 51 ^ !3 TS Q *3 ^ tS "^ '^ T3 '^ "^ '^ *^ '^ '^ "^ »-• ^M rH 



SE:S8J3^SSgSSlS8SI?&3^i2S;^Sg^g8 
8^$i?3^£lS83^2S^883{S^83fi^SS 




&8833S38g88SS8S8SSS88SS£ 



^8S3^S^g8889glSo8$3S8^^888S 



gS^SSS:t;S55S2:g8SSSSIS 






^^^ X';«?« ;R:i!; * ^ :*J 35 

^Sg8!S^gSSgSo^^:3SSg^^§S@g3 

^ ^ tS ^ T3 T2 !3 "* '^ ^^ r! '^ *"* '^ *" »■• '^ '^ *^ *-• '^ *-• '^ '^ 



g8gS^8S8S^^g3888S8:88&SSS 

^^ ^^ ^5^ ^ 

^SSi!^9S3^l3SiS£$S&$Sg!3$S88Sg{S 

« «0 <0 1- O «D «D «0 lO «0 «0 lA «0 «D «D lA lA lA CO lO ^ N f^ SQ 

•2 ^ Ti »-; ^ Fl ri »H •— »H *-• .H ^- iH f-« »H •H -^ «-l fii* iH *H »H r^ 



:^ScSoS8@^S^'8SSg338S^^SoS5SSS 

•fr.«OiA<0tO>A«O«DtAcD«0«DiAiAiAm^CQe9v^e>l 



Sg^8SSl8SSSS^S8ll8SSS8Sl' 

eeceeQiAiA>ACDCOiAtA«Ot«l^aot<>t*«Ot««D«D«D«D'^^ 

;3)8SS88SSiSS:gS8S3 ji^ \ 

CeC0 00>A>AkA«O«O*AlA«DI>>fc* *«et« * 



■«^ ^M ^n 

!$SlSg^i?g!?8$SRSSS^9SSSo^feS& 

oie4«e^Q4e4Me4^e4&i9ie^Noo-<4iiAiA^iA'«eeeoe9 

$!$8£9^Sgi?^!$S^SiSS!S!SI^^8S^^ 

SN M M W M M 04 ^ m 09 M 09 N CO ^ lA »A ■<« lA "<«< CO CO 09 



So»8g^SoSoSSaSS88S!g:S8g»8i^99 

§(9@®§d§^§3®S^^S§S§§3§§§ 

^8So8S^iS83SiSSSgSSS^88SS$S 

2£22322S9£2£Jras:22232S:i22i222'^=J 

^■^Hy^ '^T^f'^^i^r^ ^" yj ^H ^^ »^ r^ ^ r^ r^ T^ iM^»Ht^^ 



88SSS^&S8SSS8SIS88i8}SSiSgS^9 

« e- jp t- 25; J: *"'^ ►-►" J2 ^ 2 **S*® "^"^ '^ "^ "^ '^ 

:!3S5^^8SSoSiSS :8:!3S§sSS:S8S!s98 

« Tl »^ »H r-t Tl i-> — r-r-1 •^»-<»-i^i-i«-i»H»H»Hr^rHi-^ 



r^«DvH90rlcOiH«Oy4«OvM«Ovrt«Oi-l«0'^«0«-ICDvi1ie^N«D 



S? 



OS 






fi ^ 9 ^ ^ V t^ 



o- 



*4 • 

M : 
a :| 

s 



a 



5 

a 



II 






I 



I I 

6 « 

•5 »ii 



i 



47 

ooakak9a>aooofc«oooooocoaooocoaAakak«090iOkak 

:: laS :9 :::::::::::::::: : 

• ^^fiOAi) • • *d* * 0^ •••-•■• ••••* 

• *P^|^ Qm • • • QO ■ ^4 •••••••■«••••« 

• ■■• • ••■••••■•••«■• 

*o>iO'^^^ * * "Oil "CO ••••■••• ««••• 
Ok a a o» Ok o a» o o o --H r-i vi v-4 vi ^ M M N K e; oQ en «o 

:::::::::::::::::: :Si3 : :g 

t- 1« t» to t« fr- 00 00 00 00 00 CO a Ok Ok a Ok o o o» Ok Ok Ok Ok 

l» •••*•«•. •••Q0>*>0 

00 • «^ • • 'T^ 

• ■■■■■••••••■•••• ■•• 

fc*'»« 3^ * * ** 

SSS^^SSS3SSiSo3SSSSSISSS8S 

aaaaaaoaoooaoaaaoaoaoooaoQoaoooaaoataoao 



t«cwk»tv^t«aoaoaoaoaoooaoaoooaDaoocaoaaaaOQO 



(9 



: :^?2 : : :^ 






•t-t- 



•00 



•00 






404040(040 I 



®(9 



_ <9(9d 

: :g^ :&i^SSSlS»»S : : : : : :SSS 



• <0«o •«ot-t»fc-e«»b»t-t-b-e» 



•«OC«fc-> 



8£SS9&oSSk^S^^SS3SS8SSS8SS8 

fc. to t« t* t- »• «D «0 «0 «0 «0 «0 1> «0 40 <o t* <0 »:• t* r* r- <o <D 

<d<d<d(d(9^®d<9(9(d(d(d (^(^(^^^^^(^ 

• • ■ 

«Q (0 to few t» 404040 40 40 40 40 1> •40«O40 40C»^t*k« • • 



"^ ^ :S :i5 ;f? ^ ^fj:*! :jf:u 
8i$£5gS8S^SSSSS&8@&^^r:SS!S 

ooaaaaooaoooc 00 aot«t*t» 0090040 40 4D«D4D 

8 :8SgSS£8^SSS&SSl8^S38SSSS^9 

a •aaa»aaaaoao«»aot*t*t»aoaao4O404D4O4D 



^s-^S'^a^S'^S'^S'^s^S'^S'^S'^S'^a 




48 



CATTLE, HOGS AND SHEEP. 

Bang4 of pHcei (per 100 lh$,) for «ac/i week dwring 1911. 



hvoMiej 


7 




14 


t 


21 


vf : 


28 


February 


4 

11 




1A 




25 


Mwoh 


4 




11 




18 




25 


April 


1 




8 




15 




22 




29 


May 


5 




13 




20 




27 


JUD6 


a 




10 




17 




24 


July 


1 




8 




15 




22 




29 


A nnst ..,,,. r ^ - 


5 




12 




19 




2A 


September 


2 
9 




lA 




23 




30 


Oetober 


7 




14 




21 




28 


Norember 


4 

11 




18 




25 


Deeember. 


2 
9 




1A 




23 




30 


1911 


• ■ • • 


1910 


• • • • 



Cattui. 



Fair 

to 

extra 

•teer». 



15 60@7 10 
6 05®7 00 
>7 



5 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
6 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
8 
6 
8 
6 




10 
06 
00 
00 
90 



\7 
\1 
\1 

J« 
70^7 05 
75^6 95 
90<a7 85 
75^7 00 
80^6 85 
70@7 05 
90@7 10 
75C<^6 80 
85@6 75 




645 
6 50 
6 45 
6 45 
6 40 
_6 50 
60@6 50 
75@6 65 
80^6 70 
80@6 75 
90(^7 05 
65^7 00 
80@7 00 
90@7 35 
90@7 50 
10^7 85 
40C^8 10 
20<^8 15 
30^8 20 
30^8 10 
8 25@8 20 
8 25@8 15 
6 25@8 25 
00@8 35 
10@8 80 
15@8 90 
75^8 90 
75@9 15 
80@9 25 
70^9 15 
80^9 20 
60^9 30 
75@9 25 
85@9 85 
70@9 00 
85^8 85 



$5 40a9 35 
5 15§8 85 



Good to 
clioice 

co^H and 
hnfera. 




4 
8 
8 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



»8 60 
^6 25i 
>8 10 
^8 00 
^5 80 
J8 10 
10^8 30 
00g6 25 
00^8 85 
10^6 00 
20@7 00 
00@6 25 
00@6 15 
10@6 25 
25^6 16 
00@5 90 
3 75@5 75 
3 90@8 35 
3 85®6 15 
3 85^6 25 
3 90@6 00 
8 80@6 15 
3 85^6 20 
8 85@6 25 
3 60(^6 00 
3 35@5 75 
3 25@6 30 
8 40@6 10 
3 50^6 80 
3 80@6 50 
3 80@8 50 
8 75@7 00 
8 85^7 00 
3 70^7 00 
8 75(^7 00 

3 80^7 10 

4 00@7 50 
3 90^7 00 
3 85@7 00 
3 75@6 85 
3 85@7 25 
8 75@7 00 
8 50^6 50 
8 80^6 90 
8 60@6 50 
8 50®7 00 
8 85@6 85 
8 75^7 00 
8 85@7 10 
3 75@7 00 
3 85@8 00 
3 90@7 50 



Stockers 

and 

feeding 

cattle 



$3 25@8 00 
3 35^8 00 



83 50@5 85 
3 85^8 00 

3 eo@8 00 
90 
90 
85 
90 

8 60^6 90 

4 00^8 00 
8 85^ 85 
4 00@8 35 
4 15@6 00 
8 





3 80@5 85 
3 80(^5 80 
3 50@5 85 
3 75(^5 75 
3 50@5 75 
3 60§5 75 
3 40^5 86 
3 00^5 80 

2 85@5 40 

3 00^5 85 
2 50@5 00 

2 60^ 15 
300@5 40 

3 00@5 50 
3 00^ 60 

2 75@6 00 

3 00@5 75 
8 10@5 85 
3 00^5 75 
3 10@5 75 
3 25@5 85 
3 25@5 80 
3 25@5 85 
3 00(^5 75 
3 00<^5 90 
3 00(^5 90 
2 75@6 00 

2 75@6 00 

3 00(^6 00 



2 
2 
2 



75^5 90 
75@5 85 
76^5 75 
3 00@5 90 
3 00@6 00 
10@6 00 
15^6 15 



3 
3 



Hooa. 



*SKBBr. 



IJcbU 



S2 50^8 85 
2 90^7 10 



S7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
8 
7 
8 

6 
8 
8 




8 25 
8 20 

^8 12H 
8 02H 
_8 10 
35^7 90 
95^7 80 
10^7 85 
90^7 85 
80^7 85 
70^7 80 
80a7 25 
50^7 25 
8 35<^8 90 
8 10@6 75 
5 85@6 85 

5 80^6 30 

6 70@6 16 
5 85@6 40 
5 70@6 50 

5 80@6 25 

6 70@6 25 

5 80@6 85 

6 75@6 35 

5 95@8 80 
8 00@8 75 
8 25@6 95 
8 25^6 90 
8 30^6 95 
8 30<^7 45 

6 80^7 55 

7 00C$7 92H 
7 05@7 90 

7 10@7 95 

7 00@i7 85 

8 80@7 80 
8 90@7 55 
8 60@7 35 
8 00@7 15 
8 05@6 85 

5 85(^6 82H 
5 85@6 80 
5 70((f>6 65 
5 45@6 45 
5 50(^6 45 
5 65^6 85 
5 40@6 45 
5 25@8 35 
5 40<^6 35 
5 45@6 25 

5 55@6 16 

6 75@8 30 



15 25® 8 25 
8 50^11 05 



Heavy 
packera 

and 
ahippera. 



S7 70®8 25 
7 70^8 15 
"8 12H 




90 
86 
75 
45 



7 
7 
7 
_7 
76(37 40 
8 80^7 20 
8 80@7 20 
8 40^7 10 
8 25^8 95 
8 10^8 85 
90^8 80 
75@8 40 




8 45 



^8 20 

^8 00 

)8 

\t 

^8 15 

J8 15 

80^8 35 

70^8 35 

90g8 57H 
90^6 72H 
10@8 95 
10^8 85 
8 10@e 90 
8 10@7 30 
8 45@7 52^ 
8 70@7 80 
8 70^7 75 
8 90^7 80 
8 76@7 70 
8 55@7 85 
8 60^7 45 
8 40@7 25 
6 75@7 06 
5 75^6 90 
5 904^6 90 
5 95^6 75 
5 80^6 85 

5 80@6 86 

6 75@6 80 

6 95^6 72H 
8 00(^6 86 

5 80<^6 80 

6 80@6 55 
5 90@8 45 
5 85^8 35 
5 80^8 50 



|6 35<^ 825 
8 56<§11 20 



Good to 
ohoiea. 




60 

40 

75 

40 

40 

80 

_ 76 

00^4 86 

885§4 86 

4 00^5 26 

85@5 86 

40^80 

26^6 40 

26 

00 

96 

.. 80 

3 90@4 76 

4 25^00 
4 26^86 
4 50g5 80 
890^ 50 
8 86^4 70 
850^50 
8 35§4 25 
8 40^76 
8 70^5 00 
3 76A5S6 
8 76^76 
3 50^40 
8 26d4 00 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
8 





340^4 16 
3 60§4 10 
3 75A4 50 
8 85g4 80 




3 26^3 00 
8 15^8 85 
3 2504 26 
3 35S4 10 
3 15A4 26 
8 86g4 26 
385^4 86 



|S00d6 60 
8 25S9 80 



*Lamba aell $1.25(^82.50 per 100 Ibe. above sheep. Top price for lamba ia 1911 waa $7.85, and 
avaraga price for year $5.90, being $1.95 above tha average price of aheep for 1911. 



49 



BEEF PRODUCTS. 



Ccuh prices of these commodities for each week during 1911. 



January. . . 
Febniazy.. 

March . 

ApriL 

May! : ; ; : ; 

June. 

July!!!!.*; 

August. . . . 
September 

October. .. 
Noyember. 
December. 



7 
H 
21 
28 

4 
11 
18 
25 

4 
11 
18 
2fi 

1 

8 

15 
22 
29 

6 
18 
20 
27 

8 
10 
17 
24 

1 

8 
15 
22 
20 

5 
12 
19 
26 

2 


16 
23 
80 

7 
14 
21 
28 

4 
11 
18 
25 

2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



Beef bams. 
Per bbl. 



$24 50 
25 50 
25 50 

25 50 

26 50 
26 50 
26 50 
26 50 
26 00 
26 00 
26 00 
26 00 
26 00 
26 00 
26 50 
26 50 
26 50 
26 25 
26 25 
26 25 
26 50 
26 75 
26 75 
26 75 
26 75 
26 75 
26 76 
26 75 
26 75 
26 75 
26 75 
26 75 

26 75 

27 25 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
26 76 
26 76 
26 75 
26 75 
26 75 
26 75 
26 00 
26 00 
26 00 
26 00 
26 00 
26 50 
26 00 
26 00 
26 00 



1826 00 
26 00 

26 00 

27 00 
27 50 
27 50 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
26 50 
26 50 
26 60 

26 25 

27 00 
^27 00 

27 00 
27 00 
27 00 

26 50 

27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 
29 50 
29 50 
27 50 
27 25 
27 25 
27 00 
27 00 
27 00 

^27 00 
@ 27 00 
@ 27 00 

§26 50 
26 50 
26 50 

26 50 

27 00 
27 00 
26 60 
26 50 



Extra mess. 
Per 100 lbs. 



Plate. 
Per 100 lbs. 






11 00 
11 00 
II 00 
10 50 
10 50 
10 50 
10 76 
10 75 
10 76 
10 75 
10 75 
10 75 
10 75 
10 75 
10 75 
10 50 
10 50 
10 50 
10 50 
10 50 

10 50 

11 50 
11 50 
11 50 
11 50 



® 11 



11 25 
11 25 
11 25 
10 75 

10 75 

11 00 



00 
11 00 
11 00 
11 00 
11 00 
11 00 
11 00 
13 50 
13 50 

11 00 
10 76 
10 76 
10 76 
10 75 

12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 



116 00 
16 00 
16 00 
15 75 
15 75 
15 50 
15 00 
15 00 
14 75 
14 75 
14 75 
14 25 
13 75 
13 75 
13 75 
13 00 
13 00 
12 50 
12 50 
12 50 
12 00 
11 75 
11 75 
11 25 
11 25 
11 50 
11 50 
11 50 
11 50 
11 25 
10 75 
10 75 

10 75 

11 00 
11 25 
11 25 
11 25 
11 25 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 50 
11 50 

10 50 

11 75 
II 76 
n 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 



@S16 25 
@ 16 25 

§16 25 
16 25 
§16 00 
16 00 
^ 15 75 
^15 25 
15 25 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
@ 14 50 
@ 14 00 
~ 14 00 
14 00 
13 75 
12 75 
12 75 
12 75 
12 75 
12 50 
12 20 
12 20 
11 75 
II 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 50 
^ 11 00 
11 00 
II 50 

11 50 
@ 11 50 
@ 11 50 
@ 12 00 

12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 

(^ 12 00 
12 50 
12 50 
12 00 
@ 12 00 
@ 12 00 
@ 13 00 
@ 12 00 
@ 12 00 



@ 



@ 



® 



@ 



Extra plate. 
Per 100 lbs. 



Tallow. 
Per lb. 



S16 50 
16 50 
16 50 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
15 50 
15 50 
15 25 
15 25 
15 25 
14 75 
14 25 
14 25 
14 25 
13 50 
18 00 
12 75 
12 75 
12 75 
12 50 
12 00 
12 00 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 75 
11 25 
11 25 
11 25 

11 25 

12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
12 50 
12 75 
12 75 
12 75 
12 75 
12 75 
12 75 
12 76 
12 75 



@S16 75 

§16 75 
16 75 
@ 16 75 
@ 16 25 
(^ 16 25 

S16 25 
16 00 
® 16 00 

§15 50 
15 50 
§15 50 
15 00 
^14 50 

§14 50 
14 50 
§13 75 
13 25 
13 00 
13 00 
13 00 
12 75 
12 25 
12 25 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
11 50 

11 50 
(^12 50 
@ 12 50 

12 60 
12 50 
12 50 
12 50 

@ 12 50 
@ 12 50 

12 50 

13 00 
13 00 
13 00 

^13 00 
@ 13 00 
@ 13 00 
@ 13 00 
@ 13 00 
@ 13 00 
® 13 00 






5H % 7J 



5H @ 6< 



50 



STANDARD 



Range of Cash Prices for thete 



per 



>rk, B Lard, 

per 100 iba. 



Junuiy... 
Februuy.. 

Maroh 

Ainil 

May'.'.'.!!'. 

June 

July.'.*.'.'.'.! 

AugiiBt 

September. 

October.'.'.'. 
November. 
December.. 



7 
14 
21 
28 

4 
11 
18 
26 

4 
11 
18 
26 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 

6 
13 
20 
27 

8 
10 
17 
24 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 

5 
12 
19 
26 

2 

9 
16 
23 
30 

7 
14 
21 
28 

4 
11 
18 
25 

2 

9 
16 
23 
30 




42HdS10 67H 
45 g 10 67H 
10 35 

9 97H 
10 00 
9 75 

9 37H 
9 35 
9 15 
9 
9 

8 82H 
8 57H 
8 02H 
8 17H 
8 10 

8 12H 
8 06 
8 16 

8 17H 
8 20 
8 10 
8 30 
8 17H 
8 27H 
8 27H 
840 
8 35 

8 17M 
860 

8 92 

9 07H 
9 07^ 
9 35 

9 57H 
9 62>i 
940 
9 52^ 

9 37H 
900 
895 
9 00 
900 
9 02H 
9 22H 
9 16 
9 20 

9 07M 
890 
9 07H 
9 12H 
9 15 



Grease, 
eommon to 

prime, 
per 100 Ibe. 



$7 75 



600 d 
5 87>^ 



6 12H 

600 

600 



«37H 



Qreen 

looee, 
per 100 Ibe. 



Ill 62H( 
11 76 
11 62H( 
11 60 
11 25 
11 00 
10 75 
10 50 
10 87] 
10 371 
10 50 
10 25 
10 25 
10 12] 
10 25 
10 12] 
10 00 
9 87] 
9 87] 

10 12] 
a0 50 

11 00 

12 12H< 
12 12] 
12 12] 
12 00 
12 00 
12 12] 
12 87] 
12 62) 
12 87H4 
12 87J 
12 871 
12 62] 
12 87J 
11 87) 
11 371 
10 87! 
10 25 
10 12 
10 12 ^ 
10 12 & 
10 37^9 
10 12H@ 
10 25 g 

10 87H^ 
10 75 ® 
10 50 @ 
10 25 g 
10 25 9 
10 25 ^ 
10 37H@ 



^$12 25 
12 60 
12 60 
12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
11 75 
11 75 

11 75 

12 00 
12 25 
12 26 
12 00 
12 26 
12 25 
12 12MS 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 25 

12 50 
18 00 

13 26 
13 26 
13 25 
13 12^ 
13 00 
13 00 

12 87H 
18 00 

13 26 
18 26 
IS 26 
13 121 
13 87] 
12 62] 
12 12] 
11 12] 

11 12] 
10 87l 
10 62) 
10 62] 
10 76 

10 62H 
1100 

11 26 
11 50 
11 25 
11 00 

10 75 

11 00 
11 00 



51 



HOG PRODUCTS. 



oofmmodaiies for each week during 1911. 



Green 
flhoulden, 

loose, 
per 100 W 



Sweet pickled 
i hamaL 
per 100 Iba. 



Dry salted 
shoulders, 

looee, 
per 100 lbe.l 



Short rib 

sides, 
per 100 lbs. 



Dry salted 
extra short clear 
rides, 
per 100 lbs. 






8 37 



8 



$11 50 
11 75 
11 50 
11 25 
11 25 
10 87H< 
10 50 
10 50 
10 25 
10 25 
10 25 
10 00 

9 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

9 75 
10 12J 

10 871 

11 62J 

12 25 
18 00 

12 87J 

13 00 
13 00 



412 50 
12 50 
12 50 
12 25 
12 25 
12 12H 
11 75 
11 75 

11 76 

12 00 
12 00 
12 00 

11 75 

12 00 
12 00 
12 12^ 
12 12H 
12 25 
12 12H 
12 37H 

12 75 

13 25 

13 75 

14 00 
14 00 
14 00 
14 00 



13 \2^@ 13 87H 
13 37H@ 13 87H 
13 50 @ 14 00 
13 %2Hm 14 00 
13 t2ym H 00 
13 62m& 14 00 
13 00 § 18 87H 
12 Z7Hm 13 25 
12 62H 
12 37H 
12 00 
11 50 
11 37H 
12H 
11 00 
11 25 
25 
® 11 62H 
11 87H<^ 11 75 
11 25 ^11 87 
10 87HS 11 87) 
10 75 @ II 621 
10 75 9 11 621 
10 50 @ 10 87H 
10 87H® 10 75 




S10 25 



8 25 
8 26 



6 50 



$987 
10 12H 
10 12 
10 00 

9 87H# 
950 g 
9 25 @ 
9 00 a 
8 75 @ 
8 75 @ 
8 62^^ 
8 25 @ 
8 00 ^ 
7 62Vii 
7 50 @ 
7 62H@ 
7 Z7H& 
7 25 @ 

7 37J4@ 
7 26 # 
7 25 @ 
7 37H@ 

7 37H@ 
7 50 g 

7 37H@ 
7 50 @ 
7 25 @ 
7 76 @ 
7 62H@ 
7 62>4@ 

7 75 ^ 

8 62H@ 
8 62H@ 
8 50 @ 
8 37H@ 
8 37H® 
8 26 @ 
8 12H^ 
8 00 (^ 
800 @ 

76 ® 
76 @ 
76 ® 
62^ 
76 & 
87^i 

87H(^ 
76 @ 

37H@ 
26 (^ 
26 @ 
50 ^ 



SIO 62H 
10 75 
10 75 
10 75 
10 62H 

10 37H 
9 75 

9 62H 
9 50 
9 50 
9 60 

9 12H 
9 00 

B^^^ 

8 37H 
8 62^ 
8 37 

12 

12 

12^ 
800 
800 
8 37^ 
8 25 
8 50 
8 50 
8 60 
8 60 
8 50 

8 62H 
925 

9 37H 
12H 
12H 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



8 
8 
8 



9 
9 



9 25 
9 25 
9 00 
925 
9 26 
8 87K 
8 62M 
8 50 
8 50 
8 50 
8 62H 
8 75 
8 75 
8 50 
825 
800 
825 
825 



@S10 37Mi 
~ 10 87W 

10 37H 
10 25 
10 26 
10 12H 
9 62H 
050 
9 25 



@ 



7 87H 
7 87H, 

7 87^® 

8 37H@ 
8 75 g 
8 75 @ 
8 75 ^ 
8 62HS 9 00 
8 62V^ 8 87^ 
8 26 @ 8 75 

8 12^^ 8 75 

8 12HS 8 66H 
8 00 a 8 26 
7 87^ 

87H® 

87^4® 

76 

87 

87 

87 

87H<» 

60 @ 

87H@ 

87H@ 
87H® 




8 12H 
8 \2H 
8 12H 
8 00 
8 00 
8 12H 
8 12H 
8 00 
7 87H 
7 50 

7 62H 

8 00 



52 



PORK PACKING IN THE 

The following eoshibita the number of hogs packed in tke Misaissippi 



(Taken from the Oinclnnati 



Plaoxs WHKRa Pagksd. 



IliLINOIS. 

Ohlcago 

Qulncy 

Peoria 

Bloomlnffton • 

Otherpointa 

Totals 

MlBSOUBI. 

Kansas City 

St.Ii0Ul8 

St. Joseph 

Other points 

Totals 

Iowa. 

Oedar Rapids 

Marshalltown 

Sioux Olty 

Des Moines 

Ottumwa 

Manon City 

Davenport 

Waterloo 

Other points 

Totals. 

Ohio. 

Oinclnnati 

Cleveland 

Toledo 

Dayton 

Other points 

Totals 

Iin>iAifA. 

Indianapolis 

Fort Wayne 

Byansviile 

liORansport 

Other points 

Totals 

Wisconsin. 

Milwaukee 

Oudahy 

LiaOrosse 

Other points 

Totals 

NVBRASKA. 

South Omaha 

Nebraska Olty 

Other points. 

Totals. . 

Kbntuckt. 

LoulSTllle 

Other points 

Totals 



1910-11. 



8,087.996 
19.195 
30,118 

"siiasa 



2,168,681 



919,93S 
780,696 
490,928 



8,131,450 



182,475 
28,146 

894,919 
10,000 

132,363 
86,628 
80.984 
88.481 
22.866 



746,851 



806,568 

850,346 

4.'>,782 

39,012 

66,718 



598.419 



418.743 
10.000 
18,848 
18,128 
23,520 



484,234 



848.289 
166,958 

'8l',489 



446,680 



674,619 
47,883 



621,908 



58,190 



58,190 



1909-10. 



2,063,544 
17,160 
29,438 

52,840 



2,162.982 



986,118 
706,368 
541,992 



2,232,478 



166,364 

46,835 

929,548 

■■••■■ 

187,631 
30,298 
19,806 
26,066 
10,000 



764,031 



196,471 

280,969 

40,430 

38.966 

87,875 



544,701 



469.061 
13,774 
10,000 
13,987 
28,634 



684,876 



201,356 
164,468 

• • • ■ ■ • 

23,897 



889,720 



631.049 
78,110 



604,169 



09,853 



69,868 



190fr-09. 



8.640,765 
86,809 
53,848 

"60,928 



8,788,846 



1,580,481 
884,987 
641.894 



8,047,818 



836,480 
47,842 

410,884 
85.000 

289.887 
29.068 
28,200 
27,260 
30,800 



1,184,291 



845,383 

891,369 

47,000 

51,208 

19,000 



653,975 



703,285 
15,000 
13.681 
11,718 
17.795 



761,489 



800,689 
888,699 

*87;t64 



610.498 



700,778 
104,807 



806,679 



96,606 



96,606 



1907-06. 



8,670,475 
31,860 
49,127 

*'e»',839 



8,705,801 



1.366,881 

706,029 

687,084 

925 



8,750,859 



817,490 
70,482 
400,280 
123,000 
294,038 

"i»',66o 

""70,072 



1,896,802 



897,478 
880.174 

6,601 
50,606 

6,500 



681,858 



747,074 

14,800 

13,257 

8,780 

21,888 



806,r<l9 



248,704 
440,356 

'S:l863 



716,428 



748.784 
75,604 



818,288 



88,647 



83,647 



190M7. 



8,403,789 
32.641 
39.965 
36,157 
15.000 



8,687.502 



1,135.931 

656.636 

685.000 

1,441 



8.479,008 



888.759 

47,988 
890.000 
116,500 
246,500 

19*829 

14,666 



1,067.570 



886.988 
240,000 

5,150 
49.000 

5,000 



526,138 



540,486 

12.000 

18,00f) 

6.000 

8,000 



584,486 



803,647 
249,816 

"27.796 



481J258 



687,274 
107,U1 



794,886 



69,381 



09.381 



1905-06. 



2.508.868 
86,3K2 
88,754 
35.000 
12,000 



8.705,008 



1,802,736 

680.138 

721.450 

1,304 



2,606.631 



890.889 
64.071 
384.176 
128.000 
291,990 

19,000 

"14^666 



1,182.066 



256,167 

238,457 

4.833 

37,638 
5,000 



641,089 



600,428 

14,000 

16.000 

4.826 

6,000 



641,240 



173,048 

294,866 

6.500 

25,985 



496,888 



800,470 
181,848 



932318 



164,767 



154.767 



MISSISSIPPI VALLEY. 

Vaiky during the past six regular packing aeotoiu, November 1 to Ma,rd\ 1. 
Frioe Curreot) 



PuCMa Wnmrn Faomd. 


IBlO-ll. 


ISOO-IO. 


1908-09. 


1907-06. 


IBOO-07. 


190B-O«. 


HiCHiaur. 


]I».S« 


1T5J8B 


K8.lg4 


10IJ5S 


iu.8<g 


181,878 


Othorpolntt 




IIIB.9SS 


176,589 


103,184 


1«.2SS 


Il!,a40 


131,m 


MlHWrnKWA. 




121.20e 


as 


37B.000 
130,515 


"^z 


3«-J« 








TotaU 


MB.Sie 


3S0,148 


6ia,«a 


49>,51G 


430,881 


4aO,5]0 


1I,1H 


n.sii 


s 


0,179 


4i 


s 










Si8.0» 


296.801 


SM,TOe 


820,016 


104,085 




Tmnana. 




"'sim 


"■(Ciei 


■■iiloM 


"iim 


6.000 

0.688 






1L5C0 






8,1CT 


t.m 


B,000 


13.H0 


1U18S 








SttE;-EE: 


»^ 


10.817 

sas.B87 


IS.DSE 
S8B.S14 


1.9B0 


« 


18,480 




17B,M8 


23e.ESi 


»8.8M 


183,610 


aOl.70! 


247,968 




^^e:;;;:;;:: 


se,oes 
ii<,aa) 




80,000 
S5,000 




iiBtkOOO 
80.000 


:«,Bi8 




IM.SSCI 


aaw 


1 K8.4IS 


STB.OOO 


£64.000 


848.818 



BSCAFlTnLATION. 



MOT-W. 


I900-OT. 


1906-00. 






















































































ir8.6o6 


"H;o6a 


"M,eia 


11.176.484 


9.004.480 


io.4B8.oee 



NoTB.— Thetn 

WM&741,8Ge. ud the cost oi 

The total number of hoira pi 
to Norember 1st, 1910, was 13.014,8 

Tbe BTengB welRht per 1U„ . 
WMOO.TOlba., and the total poandai 

InelndM AUeshttoj. 



ir ieasoQ, from Uarch 1st 



aa HRsInst 16,437.071 for the conespondlDg time In lODO. 
hoR of the packlotc durlua tbe wlater leMoD ol 1900-1910 
> ofbogs for thai (ea«OD a,01fl,5ei.OOO. 



54 



STOCKS OF PROVI 

As reported to the Begistrar of Provisums from 



January 31, 1907 . . . 
Februanr 28,1907.. 

Maroh81,1907 

April aO, 1907 

May 31, 1907 

June 30,1907 

July 81, 1907 

August 31, 1907 ... 
September 80, 1907. 



October 81, 1907.... 
November 80, 1907. 
December 81, 1907 . 



Mess pork, 
new. 
Brig. 



January 81, 1908. . . 
February 29, 1906. . 
March 31, 1008.... 

April 80, 1906 

May 31. 1906 

June 80, 1908 

July 81, 1906 

AumistSl, 1906.... 
September 80, 1906. 



October 81, 1906... 
November 80, 1908. 
December 81. 1906. 
January 81, 1909 . . . 
February 28, 1909. . 

March 81, 1909 

April 30, 1909 

May 81. 1909 

June 80, 1909 

JulySl. 1900 

Auirust 31, 1909 

September 80, 1900 



October 81. 1900.... 
November 80, 1909. 
December 31. 1909. 
January 81. 1910. . . 
February 28. 1910.. 

March 81, 1910 

April 80, 1910 

May 81. 1910 

June 80,1910 

July 81, 1910 

Aunist 81, 1010.... 
September 30, 1910 



October 31, 1910.... 
November 80, 1910. 
December 81, 1010. 
January 81. 1911... 
February 28. 1911.. 

March 81. 1011 

April 80, 1011 

May 31. 1911 

June 30, 1911 

JulySl. 1911 

AuKust 31, 1911 . . . . 
September 80, 1911. 



October 81, 1911.... 
November 30. 1911. 
December 31, 1911 . 



e 



20,947 
22,617 
19,682 
23,815 
28,966 
22,686 
23.476 
26,406 
24,877 



3,321 

6,544 

11,180 



35,205 
47,181 
54,255 
60.517 
54,177 
56.001 
56.923 
55.283 
52,791 



45 
1,701 
4.481 
11,2«7 
13.242 
18,166 
16,138 
16,374 
16,841 
14,628 
15,022 
19.048 



169 

8,575 

9,U28 

8,351 

8|666 

10.992 

12,364 

11.269 

8.510 

6,330 

13,421 

10.604 



317 
1.274 
4.445 

6.788 
8.528 
10.498 
10.023 
14,834 
12.211 
9,093 



Mess pork. 
Brls. 



a 



g 



620 
12.432 
30,005 



e 



2,565 
969 
968 



19.160 
15.284 
10.247 



2,167 
683 
379 
250 
100 
100 



Mess pork, 



• • • I 

• • ■ < 



28.910 

20,f»90 

16.057 

12.942 

8,895 

7.412 

5,435 

4.077 

8,381 

2,093 

886 

750 



17.778 

16,218 

10,997 

7.302 

1,874 

968 

1,305 

873 

407 

180 



8,768 

5,545 

8.115 

661 

80 

16 

2 



7,352 
5.739 
8,937 



• ■ • • 

• • ■ • 



Pork, 

other 

kinds. 

Brls. 



88,251 
39,198 
38.787 
80,526 
47,279 
49,888 
41,513 
34,020 
31,462 

18,589 
12,443 
20,082 

40,971 
41,891 
42,400 
37.436 
44,«55 
53.866 
42,{>68 
36,835 
19.199 

14,111 
23,722 
40.267 
53,921 
59,971 
55,928 
49.041 
45,006 
40,878 
82.149 
22,707 
15,267 

12,458 
18,997 
31.768 
84.871 
87.274 
85.727 
404269 
42.735 
60.606 
40,284 
44.943 
80.975 

29,026 
83,890 
32,190 
84.564 
43.692 
49.361 
48.672 
47.140 
49.806 
48.5.34 
83.888 
25.161 

22,031 
29,170 
34.940 



P. 8. lard t 

contract. 

Tcs. 



20,964 

81,655 

28,672 

26.191 

56,320 

104,0ti0 

113,330 

105,240 

90.144 

48,368 

12.835 

7.032 

27,916 

86,526 

53.394 

59,328 

108,046 

147,483 

162,010 

142,344 

88,469 

46,336 
82,725 
29.165 
53,040 
54.904 
66,701 
70,161 
63,837 
67,265 
71.496 
86.250 
27,004 

9.591 

4,912 

9,256 

12,968 

7,054 

11,600 

8,845 

16,742 

24333 

87,822 

81.404 

17,118 

80.104 

22.686 

18.398 

9,252 

15,274 

33.776 

44,049 

59.780 

113.818 

148,444 

117.747 

70,730 

48,826 
45,815 
49,857 



Other 
kinds 
lard. 
Tcs. 



12,428 
17,566 
19,908 
17,486 
36,740 
4D.0O9 
32,768 
28,140 
20,254 

9,470 

8,575 

10,006 

16,896 
20,446 
23,264 
17,468 
17,632 
21,434 
29,578 
23.477 
14,440 

12,916 
18J334 
21.387 
26,504 
18.010 
18.035 
17,064 
23.677 
28.565 
26,749 
20,931 
14.036 

10,121 

10,107 

a600 

11,884 

14,761 

12,004 

11.014 

14.649 

20.786 

16.966 

9,102 

6.285 

6,006 

9.047 

9.728 

9,701 

9.998 

16,974 

10,181 

24,136 

44,066 

43,697 

29,020 

21,394 

iijuat 

14,978 
16.338 



SIGNS IN CHICAGO. 

Jaimary St, 1307, to Deeember SI, 1911, inclusiw. 



II.07B.US 


ggg«SO 


4.078.aM 


108.244 


411.887 




«.058.084 


16,049,688 




7MM» 


S.SIB,2ei 


8.064 


4!0.547 




31.310,887 


17Ji58JMI 




889.310 


£.aH.ooii 




262.206 




34.426.282 


18.806,756 


U«?.eM 


60(M10 




87;55fl 


S70.422 




82,110.887 


19,008.194 




B5a.Kl 


5,164:S3S 


rn^sfo 


ff72.910 


.1 


35,630.414 


28,880.208 




flffl'.Mie 


5.048.808 


xss» 


848.158 




3T.S7S.748 


26,326.824 


ts.asM«i 


1.0%8T4 


4,sa.e3i 


18,328 








£i,H8S,70B 


SSESi 


1,IB7.7« 


3.5IS.ST3 


4.0M 


445:238 


i. 


a4,886;059 


it 286 71, 


ao.31B.81N 


688,5U 


4.9aS.88B 




467,8Ue 




21,270.288 


19,491,877 


lOJSlSES 


881,368 


8.877,107 


18.000 


268.861 


560.708 


18,048.078 


16,4«3,7BI 


4.Tiaini 


43(,«fi2 


4,89^875 


78.173 


280.S&1 


27I.7B2 


19.883.400 




T,i44.3ae 


BSi,oeB 


8.288,838 


178.453 


288.482 


612,874 


22.422.800 


15,817,281 


*W>TI,088 


1^543 


4.002.886 


149,8«e 


719,108 




31 


17.016J>64 


88.318.088 


soe.RTS 


S.818,«S2 




801,802 






10.W80 


4S.I0033T 


T08.88S 


4.033.875 


120.367 


887.878 




K 




ii.Ke.K» 


B7B.780 


4.082.300 


83.900 


824.006 




31 




iTjnijT* 


4Ta.ZZT 


1.0gl.»B3 


87,380 


788.988 




3E 1 


lo'lSelS 


«J71.Q» 


48D.B7B 


4,898.80! 


130.086 


771.868 








4a.8gi.£gT 


m.sai 


a. 184.836 


135.8S(( 


588,009 




2t 


15J878,2a 


M.11S.4S3 


te,037 


1,STB.!S3 


36,806 


317,°S3 




29 


10JH2.46S 


U.B£8,301 


41.084 

soo 


8»e,an 












a.soe.718 


458,BU 




828,441 


543,4Se 


20.147.189 


6.767,838 


I2,18S.»T 


177.838 


i.m.m 


m;«8o' 




H08.208 


27,845,008 


7,8M.870 


B).m.i3i 


sge.i8« 


8.188.488 


1.280 


I.0««;4B0 


1,077,854 


88,8:8,517 


11.180,394 


».m.(m 


81S.47T 


I,38a.B7fl 




088.174 


1,253,466 


45,438.213 


18.868,91 




TjeSK 




'ii'M 


745,412 


1,136.444 


48.259,080 


16.811,261 




49S.MI 


5.389,023 




725.898 


790.133 




17.590,691 




497,083 






957.018 


578.187 


43;86i;or8 


18.917.088 




421.S3S 






828.484 


055,577 


4O.»5.101 


20,816,344 


islKsltts 


B4J!M 


4;3»».n4 






1,918.038 


43.704.838 


18,019.480 


u,7T0.see 


l.«0 


a.418.407 


""dm 


Alt! 143 


834.958 


21.430.000 


IT.478.490 


T.B14.84* 


i.m 


B,M4.688 




K2,074 


542,742 


28.201.381 


14.726.811 


4,MT.89» 


1,080 


1.215.838 


»:088 


81.138 


400,981 


15,819.170 


iojii,9ae 


tfiTS,3aO 




467.777 


1.W2 


150.394 


718,104 


13 i 


1.184.861 












088.687 


IC 


4.100.I3 












916,475 


21 ) 


B.087.BS 












000,685 


» ; 


7,712.38 






I.66B,J»I 




91,184 


867,014 




10.381,36 






1,443.133 




U2JS9 


591.412 


2! 1 


9.810.40] 






1^00,874 




138,127 




X 1 


9,H].46t 


iimjai 




M71332 




1SB.41B 


970,410 


2! i 


11,374,88 


S,aM.7t6 




4J60,070 




178.738 


1.3S4.I54 


K i 


UIO^ 


SJMIUM 




8,383.711 




1tIM6 


1.118,088 




3.10«J>2 










134.017 


702.331 


» 1 


1,109.57 


KuLtn 




3,351,717 




OCOM 
9I.98D 


m;853 


U 1 


iu7^ 

8.103.1M 


Ltl>U84 


moor 






i,iao.4« 


nwja 


1.888.438 


lirao' 


saj88 






8.080,89 


MSilW 


II7.0I7 


i311.130 




TS.I40 








t««8.e6S 


leD.8S7 


5.8K2.700 


*8]o66' 






2! 


14.'534.0; 


8,077. IBB 


IS8,a4S 


8.cea.735 








21 


19.44684 




19T.138 


7.827.718 


WOOD 






» 


zr.im.tx 


ixia.(M 


18.880 














usacuw 


107.57r! 


7.808!a78 


iniiBB 


4031804 




a 




nji«Mti7 


fl5.M8 


7,862.fiM 


1J3.4BO 


414.908 






B^04T.2£ 


17,»7B3H 


Ri,Bll 


7.IM.180 


04.8U0 


356.028 








14,188.™ 


141.8TB 


8,489.679 










28iTa2,« 


io.m,«B 


in,Bi4 


4,270.006 


iooIboo 


18'3»8 


469.963 


11 


10,213.45. 


*4Hl,BT7 


I69.m 


4,«BB.R0T 


158.078 


64.007 


238.058 


]4.3a4.n9 


ie.iao.« 


T3M.IWt 


829.101 


8.S07.24B 




480.703 


840.132 








* B88.51B 




251 joa 


41R«B 


308.070 


23!544:H0e 


_i}'.^'.esi 



STOCKS OF PROVISIONS IN CHICAGO— CounsmtD. 

Aa reported to fw RtgistTar of Provisions from 7anuary 31, 1307, to 
Dtcember 31, 1911, inclusive. 





BeUlM. 


California 
or picnic 
bams, and 

■houldere, 

Bweel 


iiiufllas) 
8,itsa;56S 

ss 

,*S1.MI 

13.135, tOS 

1*.M6.«8 

KS 

5,634.811 

fflf 

is 

S.8M.I>e8 
8.8UU,1S1 
12.310,868 

:.Bga,420 

fS 
si 

fl,2T?,4SO 
&.233.I78 

!gS 

8.636.758 

fflS 

lisssieeo 
io>3s:ooo 

t0.DO8.M3 
10.4S9,&30 

Kffl 

Biawiiifl 

8!045.I2» 
fl.0112.283 

s.HoriAOi 

7.6-4.MB 
lS.371.IffT 


1 

140 

i 

M 

'» 

1 

IW 
»t 

63 
87 

i 

53 

1 

78 
8,770,3*5 






S.TW.SSl 

ill 

a.eai.wa 

Si 

IO.T«.2Tfl 

Si 

12,31 1. IW 

iiii3a!5as 

3JW5.543 
3,058.510 
1,218,254 

e,8ia.«oe 

IfS 

TllTfliReO 
«.MI,661 
9.371,078 

1.7M,28fl 
3JS27.132 
B.7WM86 

IS 

11 


I0.H2,T3l 
lO.lllIsM 

siainiszi 
i.9ix.m 

3.«8,re8 
5,008.856 

B.271.330 

i.!caa.4ii 

til 

i.52S.a)3 

e,739,N& 
B.14S.MI 
10,«71,«05 

12;4,'^M5 
lilfKl-S 
]0,73H,»7 
8.0M.101 

IS 

2.1»t!31I 

as 

8.090.853 

iff 

7i250!S33 
7.116.029 

i.«OI,7M 

aa 

S.Mfl.OlO 
i.';38..1«8 




HS^:'-;";;;;:;-"" 




SrA*iiS^:::::::::.:::::;::::::-: 


4,50t.8S3 


juifSi. iw; 


9.3gS,300 










January ai.llWl 

February as, 1908 


3.Bi:iogs 

3. 788.078 

fi.34^4CT 

e,7»,7S7 




ffiSi 






iuBuB'i8?*lM«' 


«■!>• 






S?S!,l!-i«!««;:::::::,::::::::: 


1.170,750 
















)«¥ 


















g;^«r,'^>^?Sb9T.;:::::::-:;:.:::- 


'■!W 
















8,333 
«,5S7 

12.10 


846 
203 






























s 




Kn. 






12.381 


«6 
«5 

778 
















Kr;.tffl.:::::::::::: ::::::: 


8,411.133 












5.830.078 


»» 




TJtm 


SM 


l.l.-i5,5»0 



57 



n 



■ 



S 



m 



;l|| ;||| ;||| ■|li|i|||| 3 i| 



pil|Hi|||pi|l|| 



flP5|ii:|||||}|i||i| 



fmmwm 



PWPIIII 



IPilli 



"i;i;li|;i|Pil| 



wmpiifii 



wmpiiii 



wFffpmi 



UMimMiimMMiiiiiM 




M 



h 



I 



|PS5 

iPli. 
lllli 



STOCKS OF PKOVISIONS IN OHIOAOO— OourntnED. 





s.TSo.iei 

Si 

a,S50.38l) 

ifil 

ii!aro!a2j 

Sffig! 

9.8ni.SIA 

fi.T4S:03T 
S.5tt.U3 

ij.stl.ino 

151 

ill 

sloBiias! 

3,fl71,20S 
1,7M.I23 
I.TH,28fl 

7:108,953 

T.OHO.BM 

Si 


lii 

B.Slll,908 
10,111, ftM 
S,496.GKI 

slois^gsi 

5.008,»56 

9.m.m 
i,afl8.iii 

lisortlsir 

if 

g.1M.Ml 

IMILKO 

lt.377,l)M 
12.4.V.M& 

8.008.101 

IS 

2,187,311 
£,434,451 
4,2Hfl,5,'!8 

T:3fl5,&S2 
7.2M).S§3 

as 

S.7eS,87fl 

s:mii6 

H!8ilB,H5a 

'Si 

4,738..186 
fl.9K.13S 


1,481.991 

JSs 

2. :a.405 
*,24«.*8B 

IKS 

lii 

fl,5§l,7m 

fl,nT,iM 

7,476.942 
S.7*4:73« 
«.aSi.&88 
8,S(Xi.%l 
lS,310,e08 

lis- 

1.455. &39 

ss 

8.2«,450 

ill 

ii 

IS 

9!2,%1SB 
9,a75.T8l 
8,290,738 

7.937.695 

7;e.-«:Mii 

12.371.197 


8,H0,97I 
7,«89,4B8 

13;688;i40 
13,149,208 

8iS34iie5 
S.567,M0 

ISZ 

e.0O7,4J4 

!fflS 

8,430.893 
8,«5S.481 

4,8M,iia 

as 

13,09t|£38 
11,978.906 
10.654,353 

J,IC8.67B 

3,718.412 
8,TPD,345 

S 

s 

i 

19 

7,Da.8ni 

III 

e!»34!4;v 

Si 






3,479,815 


























Novembers, IWT :::'" 

Decemberai, 1907 


3.188.073 


February as, 1008 


8.7«,75T 




i-Sffl 






J11I73I.IMH 


8.M7,658 






Ocloberai.ieM 


1,170,790 
















!« 


















»?,'?,':!!»"".::::;:::::::.:::■ 


'«S 
















i-ffi-S 




















































!43a!399 




l°«!!,"mv;::;:::::::-::-:::::: 


feeSr.:::;:;::::.:::::: 


3,542.197 



mm 



piill 



EEMHil 



iiWfifiiiiii 
wmm 



If 

wiwiitl 



wffifpiiii 



wippiiifi 



'mmu 



WMffpillll 



lUMuuiiMMMMiiiiiM 



ilii 



-llli 



EASTBOUND 

StaUimnt dvnoing Eattbonnd'Shipmentt, from Chicoffo, 6v rail, during 



















































00 








700,800 


4,700 


































































































































































































































M.87B 






















00 






eoe.ooa 


1.000 












































































































































































00 


3.000 




S,700 


0,200 








































































no 




10,100 


























































































































































312,400 






oi.too 


1,B97,7I» 


400 


























































































M 








M 


« 






































































































































































TS,(I7S 




i.iAi.ita 




U.TOCL 




410.300 


i.no 
























30 




M 




00 
















7 112 TOO 


3S.H(l,07It 




TU.lOO 




33.708.300 


101900 






sw. 


































































8»e^ 









RAIL SHIPMENTS. 

laA aietk in 1911, a» reported to tite CSikago Board of Tradt. 



BtgosiCim 


OmiUMti 


^kowdlfaXi 


DnwdBHi 


B«f. 


Pork. 


I^rd. 


ChHW. 


BDtt«r. 


liii. 


LbH 


Cu«. 


Ux. 


PktB. 


Bite, 


Lb«. 


Lba. 


Lb*. 


"-00 


00 


11,411 


0.704.40O 


1.881 


i,m8 




WO 






00 


M,l» 


4,»40.7a 


051 


1.481 


00 


MO 






00 


fiI.7Sl 




2.305 


1,148 








m 


00 


»,«* 


7473,101 




8,508 


00 






00 


00 


U.S17 


7.731.700 




3.331 


00 


WO 




00 


00 




4.B38,«0I 




1,113 


00 








00 






1.884 




00 






M) 


00 


»3:o*i 


4;»40.00. 


2.157 




00 






DO 


00 


48.101 


18.I3I.W0 


3.en 


z.m 


CO 


SCO 




M 


CO 


41.DS3 


B.3S1.700 


S.11S 


2,188 


00 






«l 


00 


41,<7S 


8.117.200 


4.813 


1,803 


CO 






00 


00 


u.m 


3.4M.400 


8,013 


3.344 


00 


»0 




100 


00 


14.74S 


3.4S8.400 


1.878 


1,311 


00 


WO 




Ml 


00 


lA.tao 


1.V18.800 


1,861 




00 


TOO 




00 


DO 


1«,1H 


11.8O1.KI0 


700 


l!371 


00 






00 


00 


^.m 


».37B.aoo 


488 




00 






...JOO 


00 


H,374 


1.70«.000 


I.IH 


1,081 


00 


SCO 




IIT.TOO 


00 




8.447.401 


3.S03 




00 






3U.M0 


00 


1«[045 








00 






I11.M0 


00 


M701 


4,30<i:40l 


i;404 




00 






UiMO 


00 


14.813 


8.538.301 


1.180 


1,172 


00 


100 




m.soo 


00 










00 






m.aiM 


00 


15:430 


2l!433!40> 




1,184 








87.700 


00 


!13Sg 


1,380.800 


l!l80 










i»:4oo 


00 


lolsis 


8,MS:iO( 


1.016 


1.184 


X 


00 




108.000 


00 








.838 








101.000 




u.m 


6.S2LM» 


im 










87.100 


00 


is.»8e 


0.312,400 


1,718 


2,765 


00 


00 




1U.1D0 


00 


n.i»s 


7.114.200 


1,784 


1.041 








117,300 






IJ3I,800 




S.031 




00 




111.300 




t3.m 


20.410.001 


11888 






oo 




tM.000 




10.313 


7.55S.800 


1.890 


1078 


00 


00 




1M.400 


00 


3I.HT 


4^)08,800 


1.118 


,ai8 




oo 










4.678,100 


860 


,611 




00 






00 


mIbss 


«,2M,30( 




.378 




oo 




DO 


X 


17.782 


4.111,801 


eao 


.332 


00 


00 




n 


00 


17,174 




880 


,087 




DO 






00 


11.1104 


9.204!70l 




.758 




00 






00 


itm 


18.031.000 








00 




DO 


00 


18.033 


18378,801 


1,331 


1817 


00 


00 






00 


ltM3 


18.487,001 


1,157 


,204 




00 








18.13! 


18.033.100 








00 






00 


Sb»i 


l^o4a.7oo 




|0J7 


00 


oo 




DO 


00 


11.827 


11.880,001 


1,070 


,873 


00 


00 






00 




11.114,201 


1.488 


,286 




00 






00 


13.01S 


ll.7T0.M)0 




.018 




00 






00 


11.017 


0.882,000 






00 


00 




DO 


00 


21.801 


8.782,001 


850 


751 


00 


00 




DO 


00 






7113 


1.318 




00 






00 


1I.>0t 


ifttoolsoi 








00 




DO 


00 


17.488 


12.858,000 


817 


ijso 


00 


00 




DO 


00 


11.012 


10.287,700 


340 


1.013 








ILWOOO 


SMssasoo 


1.807,707 


701.388,100 


00,832 


81.162 


277,813.000 


31,847.(100 


241,022,300 


6.0SU18 


4I7.1M.S« 


828.014 






114,880 


147J11J8e 


27.819,280 


214.301 .ira 




U9.na;rai 


478;«8a 


m.mM 




172,071 


134.387,730 


27.800,703 


188.107,310 


l»*7,»M 


EKUNK.11S 


7J3iM3 


Ml.tOS.04i 




184,300 


3flO.S80.OBl 


29.428,086 


134,885.848 


njajm 




uua 


eeii.t7S.ua 


I3^0» 


U8.17S 


376,884,380 


25.112,308 


m,601.1«8 





60 

EAST BOUND RAIL 

SlaUmtnt showing Eastbouad Shifinunts, front Chicago, by rail, 
ft. iC ] 



t,ut 



S,MM 

S,D8i 
T,M3 

«,B27 
T,t30 



NoTwnb«r. . . 



l,»4ll,fiHI 
2.1X5.889 



B3,4N,g4. 
99.I7».7Z4 

a5,E7a.tw 
mmsATt 



M1310 

U1J90 



61 



SHIPMENTS- 

diiri»g each week i* 



-(C3ontinued). 

1911, as reported to the Ckieag^o Board of Irade. 



'tsr- 


Tg... 


9»jJ» 


"ffi-- 


"K- 


IS!- 


la' 


"■SS*- 


OCjJ. 




i 

i 

i 

i 

i 
I 

00 
00 
00 

00 

i 

00 

i 

» 

M 

SJS! 


se,«oo 

170,100 
JT4.M0 

II 

soriooo 

:s 

113.300 

IS 
■ass 

IB0.100 

sS 

mIooo 

10B.1W 
50.300 

iGi.sro 

Sffi 




1 


1M.«00 

110.700 

s 

17t.lOO 

iStoo 

170.100 

ii 

Rffi 

1 

II 

134,200 
lH,IKn 

12:S 

M,300 
«i.000 

31.1100 

•Si 

100.300 

1S8.I0O 

iH,goa 

239.900 

los^too 


«o 

i 

KM 

i 
i 


100 

i 
i 

i 

i 

«0 

i 

i 

TO 

i 
i 

s 

00 
00 
00 

oo 

00 
oo 




1.S0O 


lot 


1,173.300 




i 


13 

..Si 


303.300 




S! 


s 




ii! 








Si 


B;ffi 




i,«i 


i,a« 


ISOJOO 






















1.87S 








sa 
















i!S 




08.000 

7i.aoo 

10.000 


























UT 








■■■ I.0M 
















lib 

Ji 

''Si 

no 














000 
















B» 


M.SOO 
lU^OOO 

■mm 

44i:(X» 
BlsllOO 










MS, BOO 
111,300 

iwlsoo 














s 




IM 






400,000 




lEl.lWO 

as 

IIS.IOO 
















U 


jsisoo 


1.0l7,Ttf 




'ligiSS 


i 


i 


B.8T7.900 

uffiiS 


<.»i7.800 

■SffiS 


337.<71.100 
3M.lg9.Ofi8 

sssa 

403,J89,»1 


ll.81t,IOD 



DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cath, and MivirtM* in meet^iMf months at 




Cootnot, 



!!™?i 



11 WM 



Bi 



10M@1 1( 



wiiM^ 







lab, 
pvM. 



ptrioahii. 






lis 79 $30 00 
IS 75 gW DO 
30 3S #20 87^ 




ieO!H@l 
97H@1 



iS 



18 37H 
18 IE ei8 K 



•!!«|j 
N 



IT U ai8 07^ 



K 



10 M 
10 M ^ 



8 »i ai 

■ SIM91 
II 10 Si 



^ 



^ 



LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

MlUrt' option as to time, during January, 1911. 




DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cask, and MmrtAU i 





S>^>i 



porM. 



IMcmlti. 



MM 






m 



• 00^ 

9 DO a a S7H 



'»! 



LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

mOmft' ffpHon as to Imh ifwnMf Ftbmory, 1911. 



it 



Mo.1, 



si: 



S'tix 



l?i 






>kS^ 



»;! 



liSliK 



) gsi 



SHORT RIB BIDES 



lob, 



im 






10 00 aio so 

9 S7H@10 so 

s B7i^@io so 



SIS @ 8 
lis @ 9 

« 25 @ g 

B W @ 

suss 



30 a ) 97^ 
07H5»1S 



W 01 



s 



■ It @ « 

B 27H® 9 . 

9 nWS 9 MK 



9S m 7 

Hi @ 7 
e* ® 7 



t u a 700 



DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cofh, and dtlimrabU in tueaeding numths at 



Nortiwn, 



SBKe 



,T%.', 



Contact, 



!iSi 



u ii isiiji i%Si itnli MHtl OBH 






WjSl OTHI I 



m. 



Uv. 



is; 



Ml 



WVi M 7t QM Tt 



24 «)J8« 7B 



.KTO 



an 6 STO 

8U SSTD 

sw § su 
B at 3 8 an 

81B a sso 



LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

Astlera' option at to time, dun'ng March, 1911. 






iSa, 



No.!, 

















M 
































































AG 







'& 



g'giSSi 



rgsa 



g'^a 






twH aanmiN 



M I IS 

83 @ Tl 




DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cash, and dtlivtrabU in tuecrtding months at 



88™ tOKI 



93 @l U 

1 osmIi ISH 



iS 



87H MMS 89 



ShISx 



^'DSf' 



MWKK 



.J 7E @IS 

it 25 @IB 

15 25 @ie 

16 25 @]e 



1110 20 U S25 7S 



14 BO @15 
14 97HW1S 



IS 00 ©IS 
il 07M@H 
l5 37^(4 IS 
IS S2H&1S 
:s B2!-,@ie 
.S3I «illS 
IS 35 mi 
IS 30 «i>15 
SSO @16 
:S 32M<"'13 
,5 dHUlS 
ISES @1S 



ISOTH 



A 



IS 07H@1S 40 

14 es S1S12K . 
14 tm&u SS 



14 S7M@1 



14 S2M . 

15 12^ t 

„14 97W , 

14 S7H&1S 22!^ . 

14 mnmi 17H . 

14 S7H^.1S 10 

15 00 @1S 10 
14 93H@1S 02>j . 

= - -J ©15 40 

i2S 9T.4 20 «0 @2S TS 



. t B 1ZK@ 8 16 
7 SS @ T S7H 

802k 

7 87H@ 7M 



8 IIM 
8 12H 
8 02H 



p«id5W 




7 7S @ S 31H 
11 BO @IS 77H 



LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

stBtrt' option at to tim* during AprU, 1911. 




DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOE THE 



Cash, and dtltvtrabU in sttcceeding mcmiht at 



Mh. 



July. 



A 



\ »7M 






It! 



Si 



K 



«B gl 18^ I 00 01 tlK 



B3H@I II 



8«i@ t 
91H®1( 



A 



a 



76 ei7 K 
71 823 M 



87m|m e7H 



14 SO @14 SIM 
14 «0 lUBSH 
14 42HSU W 



flS 10 
IS 18 
IS J7M 



It w ai4 u 



It OTHSM 80 

14 OS 

IS 17}^ 14 " 



BTJ48U T7M 
80 ©MOTH 
H 3IS !0 

nH@isoo 
sg @i4 giM 

SS @14 73M 
37Hi» WH 



IS 95 m* OIH 
IS OS @U 10 

It 10 



14 tzH^lt i3h 
14 a7{^[4 40 
It 3t 



S ITM 

ao7H 



r oii^BJO 

I so 913 SS 




TVS a S31 
II OTH0I1 IX 



LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

mIUti' option ai to (im#, during May, 191!. 



SHORT RIB SIDBB 






JdIt. 

Kiooni*. 



paUoha. 



B 10 a s u 



m\ 

8 00 ^ 
HMS 8 00 
S2!43 TOO 



8 06 a 8 42H 
11 Ot glJSO 



It a 8 12 



7i!^ 8 IS T «7H@ 8 OS 
to @12 81 11 87>i®13 70 



72 
DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cash, and deliverable i» tueeeediitjf tnoiUMs at 



m\ 



sani 



OS ai c 
«8 Si ( 



Contnet, 






I mi 



; ^^. 



M a w S4 ai 03 

R7M@1 M I 00 gl 14 



mm I 

»Hgl( 



«c a t 



»»<Sira»i ' 



. tams»M, 



STHgM 



p«M. 



:!K 



u STHais oc 
SI n SM li 



30 mi 
KHmi 

17WW1J 



14 g7H@IS 30 . - 
14 BZ<^@lt 31M.. 

14 » @IS 16 .. 



iitd aiSM .. 

i@15 70 .. 

jQia 7S ., 

1E3J @lfi 50 .. 

liisMH.. 



14 II 316 76 



Sim 
siiH 







Boa a s 

11 S2Hdll 



73 
LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

itUers' option as to Hme during June, 1911, 



SHORT RIB SIDES 



uMasu 

IS S ITM 

n 8U 






SI7HaB 

1106 ail 



l7Ha8 w 






7 77>^ 8 UH B 13M9 B 38 I 
II 78 911 n)A 13 m gll 87M 



8 U @A n 
8 7D g8 St 



74 



DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cash, atid deUwrahU in succ**ding tnontht at 




pwH' 



IS 711 @1S 
IS Tt @1K 
IS 8JM&1* 



.7 S7H@I' M 
.7 UHQt7 M 

ssMensc 

00 d!7 0C 



IS CO @1G 
. IB M @1G 

: IS ES @1G 



. IS 30 « 
. IS SO «, 
IE 40 @I5 



-» 47)4@18 
IS SO tlilfl 
•AM #17 




75 
LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

stlUrs' option as to timt, during July, 1911. 



7a 

DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cask, and deliugrabU in ntcctading months at 




OdotH, 






w^ 



s»«a 91K M ei IS sst^ ssm 



■ S'tl 









IT et @iT so 



- ^ 37W 

37M@1' W 
3Th@17 SO 



DO 017 »■ 

M @1S7G 

fio eis 16 

SO @1« 7S 

SO @18 7S 



17 SO 

17 20 

IT IS 017 10 



IS » @1S 2S 

15 as ais 40 

IS 8TH#1S 40 



IS W @1S 80 



5S @1S BZH 
27i4®lfl BS 
31K@1S t2M 
3!H@1A SO 
20 @1« 27}^ 
IS @1«30 
20 glASO 
1« 8S @ie 4S 



It 17H@1B 4S 
IB 26 ©IfltJM 

IS as @i< 37H 
IS tsuiie u 

IS 32K@lfl U 
IS OS iUITH 
IB 00 @IS 20 

00 @iB fa\^ 

7S @1SS0 



S^J 



LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

stUtTs' Option as to tint*, during Auguit, 1911. 



palO^bL 



SHORT RIB SIDES 






8 >s a 8 80 
SS5 I sot 



B i7M 
OS R ITM 

oikS > 10 
00 fivos 

W I H07H 
mt S IS 

1V« BSO 
10 I S17M 

— «4a 

^9 OH 



ts 2!H@ s s:h 

' 8 30 @ 8 STH 
S2t @ gSfi 
8 3!H@ 8 t2H 



37Ha9 
2S S 9 



: ft5 @ S 12!^ 
I W «o B (KM 

i s:h@ 8 OS 



I OD @ B a7H 
; KH& 8 fl7>i 
. C5 © » 02H 
. 97M@ » 07W1 
: 97K@ 9 OS 
00 @ » 10 



IS!I 



8 18 @ 8 32H 
8 26 @ 8 30 
8 £2H@ 8 31>j 
8 32!^© 8 37M 
8 37>^@ 8 i3H 
8U @ 8 50 
8 37!^ 8 4a 
8 30 @ 8 32!^ 
8 36 IS 8 42W 
8 38 @ 8 46 
8 35 @ 8 42M 
8 37K@ 8 4!M 



KttS d 

sue 

848 g 



A 90 @ 
700 3 
896 @ 



BiTuasso 

11 80 Sll 17H 



: 48 a 9 ITH 
' ll^ilO 77!4 



!2H® 8 80 
I2H@ 9 »0 



DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cash, and deliverable in tueeteding mtmths at 








B4fi 

9 30 
9 17M 
9 22k 



79 
LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

MtUtrs' option as to tinu, during SgpUmbtr, 1911. 




DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cask, and deliverabU in sitecttding months at 




';:h' 



. IB SO mi 71 



. IS «2K@I5 71 

. IS e2H®i» II 

. tS II2H§1S " 

. It tan&ii 71 

. IS 02M@1S 7! 

. IS so @iii aiM 
I SIS 00 

t Sis 71 



;i4 MH®n MM 

14 B2!^@IS 00 

li D:;i@is IS 

15 IS @I5 30 
IS U §1S 4S 
IS 37 h@ IS 47H 
IS 10 lis 30 

IS 10 esis 10 

IS 20 felSSJM 
IS I3W1S » 

IS i7H®i8 as 

IS 22HCn>lS 3I!4 
IS JS eiS MH 
It S7>«'ris S5 
IS S!!^@1S KS 
It T7HC01S Of- 
IS 73H(<°1S OS 
IS 00 @1S TO 
IS ttami 70 



14 wHais o; 

IB to Sl7IK 



t 14 MM 

14 90 @14 07^ 

14 vmm* »S 

14 OS @1S 10 
It 07H@1S !2M 
IS 20 

15 30 ®1S 30 
14 97M@IS KM 

14 97H^IS OS 

15 OS @1S \m 
IS 07K(ai5 I7>s 
IS 07M@It St 
IS 20 mi 21H 
IS 3TKg.lt fl2M 
IS U ^1t BS 
IS ftS @15 flJM 
IS 87H@1S 07K 
IS SS @IS 02!^ 
IS TIHmlS 90 
tS 7S @1S St 
It TTH@1S WH 
It TS @It 87iS 
15 8S gllgTU 
It S1>4@1S tm 
IS T7H#1S BTH 



8 WM 

RSS 

S92M 

3 SS 

SSO 

380 

BTTM 

8 7TH® 8 80 

::::::: bttm 

'.'.'..'..'. 8 9JM 

'.'.'..'.'.'. 9 10 

900 

887M 

885 

::;:::: !S!I 

B82M 

B8TM 

8 T3!^ 8 LO 
12 St Sl3 10 



VD en 00 

8 Slim 8 SS 

" -" * a 871* 

S97« 

8B7H 
9 00 
8S5 

B 80 a 8 83M 

B SO S S SIH 

8 80 

8 80 

8T7M 

BWH 

8 92Ka 9 X 

8 9Twi 9 OSU 
g OS g 9 OTM 

9 DO a 9 fan 

8 U a 8 90 
8 BS a 8 R7H 
8 S7Ma 8 00 
8 OTH# 8 80 
8 BO a B 87H 

8 BO a 8 stU 
8 7S Ssat g^ 

8 STMA « OTJj 

11 u ail OS 



LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

uiUrs' option as to tim«, during Octobtr. 1911. 







t TO ea to 
TM St go 



82 



DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cask, and tUlivtrabU in succetdtng months at 



K 



7i a ( 

87 S I 



K 



St Si 






tit 47H@1S « 
IS 82H^IS W 

IS SO @is i■^ 



\h e2!^lB 10 



It IS @is zHi 



It ceiis^.is 

16 02H^10 
It 10 @16 
It BTMSIB 
It 09 @lt It 



CuA, Nondn 

[H lODIIa. ptr ICO lb 



JIM ,. 

70 

SZH . 

„ «IH .. 

&1« WM . 

amwH .. 



'M 



oiiMdO 



LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

uUtrs' optxon as to titm, dunng November, 1911. 



SHOBT RIB BIDES 



ptclOoffL 



M«. 

wioilba 



Cuh, 
palOOlb*. 



MiIM'Ui 



f 17mS « » 



« im • »H 
tuMdoso 

8 SIMS lU 



i 17H@ 8 " " 
. 8 ID @ S . . 

i 8 32M@ 8 a^W 8 

. 8 30 @ g 32H 8 
8 » ® 8 10 - 
8 3SM@ " " 

4 8 40 © 

8 40 @ B S2H 
S 3S @ 8 40 

j 8 48 @ 8 fi2> 
8 42H@ 8 60 



8 GI ^ S S!H 
8 S2M^ 8 fl7(i 
8 S2H(<A 8 57H 



800 ( 



aB7M 8 



8 12K 8 
B l!M 8 



t E2Hlii> 8 SO 



E 70 @ S Si 

S TO @ CU 

»8e @ fiU 

5 7G @ « U 
t 86 @ SU 

8 en @ fl RTH 

6 RB @ g 70 
S W «« fl U 

sso @ a SO 



8 87M@ 8 !2H a 
8 a7Hftl 8 7S ■ 
8SJ(i© 8 — • 



i 8 iT«@ 8 srw I 

i 8 71 @ 9 ITH • 



48 a S70 
U e 8Tt 



84 



DAILY CURRENT PRICES FOR THE 

Cask, and dtliorTxM^ i» tueending months at 



No.1, 

Northmk 



A 



I (M @l < 

ii oe @i I 



iioow 

*l OOH 

I 98H 
« MM 
g 97H\ 



"Si 



nx: 



00 @ ( 






«8 @T1 



J^Im 



) sit oc 



IS 43^@19 70 
15 40 @li U 

■■ ■■ miS2H 



15 «a «ei« 

15 SlH®lt 
15 I2,Li@]- 



15 u @ie 

15 tl2H©lB 

IS 00 @ie 
15 nnm^ 

15 90 @ig 

15 to @1S 



lab. 
pwbtL 



16 WH@1S 
le D5 @16 

"is w' ©1 

■*ifl07M@lfl 

la i)7Hmr 

" OSMil- 



CtA, JiimiT. 

pa lOOW p« lOO bL 



{!g: 



I R 22Wa 9 U 



IBS 



l!?<l! 



75 3lD9C 



LEADING SPECULATIVE ARTICLES. 

ttUtrs' option as to timt, during December, 1911. 




86 



CASH FLAX SEED PRICES. 

Daily current cash prices of this cereal from January 7, 191 1^ 

to December 31^ 1911, inclusive. 

No. 1 and No. 1 Northwestern, per Bushel. 



Date. 



JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



MAY 



JUNE 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
16. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
80. 
81. 



1911.... 
1910.... 



12 38H@2 51H 
2 42 @2 55 
2 45 ^2 58 
2 46 @2 59 
2 46 @2 59 



12 55M@2 68^ 
2 56 @2 69 
2 56 @2 69 
2 55 @2 68 



$2 53 @2 66 

2 56 (^2 69 

2 55 @2 68 

2 54 §2 67 



$2 39H@2 51H 



12 42 @2 55 



2 39>i@2 5m 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



44 

37 
44 

45 
46 
48 



@2 57 
m 50 
@2 57 
@2 58 

t2 59 
2 61 



2 54 @2 67 
2 54 @2 67 
2 55H@2 68H 
2 57 @2 70 
2 59 @2 72 
2 59 @2 72 



2 54 
2 54 
2 55 
2 55 
255 
2 55 



@2 67 
@2 67 
4^2 68 
@2 68 
@2 68 
@2 68 



2 39H@2 51H 
2 44^(^2 56J 
2 44H@2 56' 
2 41>^@2 531 



2 43H@2 65H 



2 51 @2 64 
2 57H@2 70H 
2 57 @2 70 
2 57 @2 70 
2 54H(^2 67H 
2 53 ®2 66 



2 59 (^2 72 
2 58 ^2 71 
2 58 g2 71 
2 61H@2 74H 
2 61H@2 74H 



2 55 
255 
255 
2 54 
2 54 



)2,68 
\2 68 
>2 68 
@2 67 
@2 67 



2 43^@2 65 
2 44H§2 56 



2 46H<^2 58H 



2 54H@2 67M 



2 61H@2 74>^ 
2 58 @2 71 



2 53H<^2 66H 
2 56 @2 69 
2 56 @2 69 
2 56 @2 69 
2 52 %2 62 
2 54 @2 67 



2 58 @2 71 
2 57 @2 70 
2 55H@2 68M 



2 54V^2 67H| 
2 52»^(a'.2 64H 
2 47H(<92 59H 
2 42V4(.i2 544 
2 ZhMm \VA 
2 38H@2 50H 



2 49H@2 61] 
2 51V!2^2 631 
2 5m^2 63) 
2 46H(^2 59j 
2 47 @2 60 
2 46H@2 59H 



2 42 
2 42 



®2 56 
@2 55 



2 
2 
2 



2 55 ®2 68 



2 
2 



56 
55 



@2 69 
@2 68 



2 38 @2 50 
2 38 @2 50 
2 38 @2^50 
2 39 @2151 
2 39H<^2 51H 



49 
49 
47 
2 46 
2 46 
2 42 



@2 62 
@2 62 
@2 60 
@2 69 

§2 69 
2 55 



2 25H 



2 37 
1 92 



@2 70»^ 
@2 26 



2 54 
2 04 



@2 74^ 
@2 22 



2 35H@2 60 
2 094@2 35 



2 39H@2 63H 
2 20 @2 43H 



2 25H@2 55 
1 94H<d2 42H 



1 75 ®2 18 



Date. 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 



JULY 



AUGUST 



235 



2 49H@2 50 
2 44H@2 45 
2 45 



235 
2 57 
2 50 



SEPTEMBER 



2 55 
2 57 



2 55 



. 2 69H 
. 2 60 
. 2 66 
. 2 66 
@2 56 



2 43 @2 50 

253 

265 

2 66 

2 56 

259 



2 59 



2 54 
2 49 



^2 

\2 

2 

2 



57 
51 
44 

47 



2 39 ®2 40 



2 29 ®2 30 

2 27 

2 31 

2 31 

2 31 

227 



OCTOBER 



2 36 



. $2 30 
. 2 41 
. 2 86 
. 2 41 
@2 38 
. 2 84H 



2 31 
2 34H 
2 32H 



2 42H 
243 



245 



@2 47 
. 238 

. 2 41H 

. 2 42 

. 2 41 

. 2 36 



37H 

41H 

40 

28 

24 

18 



2 13 
2 13 



NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



S2 17 
2 14 
2 13 
2 12 



II 94 
198 
1 98 
108 



2 11 



1 99 



1 97 

2 01 
200 
202 



109 
200 
2 02 
208 



204 



. 207 
. 206 
02 05 
. 2 02M 
. 2 05H 
. 209 



203 
203 
204H 
2 10 
207 
2 10 



206 
203 
2 01 
202 
200 
194 



10 

11 

09 

10 

09H 

12H 



1 98 
195 
193 



2 16 
2 12 
2 14 



1911. 
1910. 



1 97M<S2 55 



2 85 
2 23 



02 57 

@2 57H 



2 27 
2 21 



02 60>i 
@2 84 



2 13 
2 29 



02 47 
02 70 



1 93 

2 87 



^2 17 
^2 78 



1 04 A2 10 

2 22H02 57 



i^RSS^ 



ssssrss!:;.^;; 












ssfeisisM 



3&ii=5RSSS 









giiiiiiii 



Q 




s 




1 




■ 




i 

■< 








i 




i 

= 




1 




1 




1 


J.K.SS5.S 


1 






iiiiiiiii 









ji^^B^O^ 



^^^■^-^'^i^-X-^ 


















sis§i§§i§ 



90 



91 



TIMOTHY AND CLOVER SEEDS. 



Receipts and shipments of Hiese commodities during 1911 1 by routes. 





TlMOTHT SbBD. 


Clovbb Sbbd. 




Received. 
Lbs. 


Shipped. 


Received. 
Lbs. 


Shipped. 


Lake 










ChioaaOk TndianA A Southcim Ry. . . . 


40,000 
2,816,700 

078,000 
4,162,000 

160,000 


62.100 

4,100 

16,400 

80.000 


46.800 
160,000 
202.800 
200,000 
240,000 




ChicaiEo A North-Westem Railway 


309,500 


Illinois Central Railroad 


30.600 


CUeago, Rock Island & Padfio Railway 


170,500 


Chicago, Burlington A QuincyRailioad'. 




Chicago 4fc Alton Railroad 






Chicago A Eastern Illinois Railroad 


40.000 
10,767,000 


150,600 




04,000 


Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway 


571.800 


300,000 


Wabash Railroad (went of Chicago) 






Chicago Great Western Railroad 


3,405,000 
132,400 
110,000 




21,500 

102.300 

50,000 




Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway 






MfameapoUa. St. Pan) A Sanlt Ste. Marie RaUway 

El^n, Joliet A Eastern Railway 










Chicago, Indianapolis A Louisville Railway 


08.700 
61,500 




1,026,500 
1,200,700 


52.700 


Eastern Lines 


' '26,050 300 


1,844,800 






Totals 


22.752,100 


20,371,500 


8.831.400 


2,780.600 







TIMOTHY AND CLOVER SEEDS. 



Receipts and shipments of these commodities during 1911 ^ by mtmths. 



January . . 
February . 

Mareh 

AprU 

June 

July 

August ... 
September 
October... . 
November, 
imber. 

Totals 



TiMOTHT Sbbd. 


Clovbr Sbbd. 


Received. 


Shipped. 


Received. 


Shipped. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


1.311,100 


2.078,400 


04,400 


480.800 


1.560,100 


2,108,500 


623,600 


681,600 


1,205.200 


2.751,000 


760,800 


503,500 


367.600 


1.004,100 


378,100 


251.700 


106.100 


159.100 


363,600 


185.300 


54,700 


3.600 


406,000 


52.200 


87.000 


3.200 


60.000 


11.500 


4,450,600 


2.451.700 


270,000 


118.300 


5,820.300 


5.038.200 


518.500 


50.900 


4.011.200 


2.034,500 


197.500 


110.500 


2,649.000 


2.051.400 


176,300 


203,600! 


1.120,300 


687.800 


94.700 


131,300 


22.752,100 


20,371,500 


3,831.400 


2.780,600 



92 



OTHER GRASS AND FLAX SEEDS. 

Receipts and shipments of these products during 1911, by routes. 





Otbbe GRAas Sbid. 


Flax Skkd. 


fl 


Received. 
Lbs. 


^^ 


Received. 
Bu. 


Shipped. 
Bu. 


Lake 




868.000 

6.000 

1.504,800 

290.200 

258,800 




LOOO 


ChioagOt Indiana ic Southern Railway 


204,800 
2,084,200 
603,600 
480,000 
120.000 


12,200 
672,800 
10.200 
11.000 
47.000 




Chicago St Nortb-Weatcra Railway 




IlUn^s Central Railroad 


8,400 


Chicago. Rock Island & Pacific Railway 




Chicago. Burlington A Quincy Railroad 




Chicago A Alton Railroad 






Chicago A Eastern Illinois Railroad 


1.820.000 
5.000.000 


278.000 
44.800 






Chicago. Milwaukee A St. Paul Railway 


107.000 




Wabash Railroad (west of Chicago) 




Chicago Qreat Western Railroad 


480,100 
85.100 




6.700 

1.300 

20.000 




Atchison. Topeka A Santa Fe Railway 


70,000 




Minneapolis. St. Paul A Sault Ste. Marie Railway 




El^n, Joliet A Eastern Railway 7 








Chicago, Indianapolis A Louisville Railway 


80,000 
562.800 


42.000 
10.864.600 






Eastern Lines 


62.800 


161.200 






Totals 


U.060.600 


13.812.100 


050.500 


166,600 







OTHER GRASS AND FLAX SEEDS. 

Receipts and shipmsTUs of tJiese prodv,ets during 191 U by months. 



January . . 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August .. . 
September 
October... . 
November. 
December. 

Totals 



Othcr Qbass Sbbd. 



Received. 
Lbs. 



767.400 
.611,800 
,057,700 
650,600 
463,000 
86,600 
166,700 
,050.600 
.632.100 
,266.400 
,319,000 
087,800 



11.060.600 



Shipped. 
Lbs. 



1,389.800 

1.118.000 

2.746.200 

1.058.800 

062,400 

288,200 

300,400 

1.472.200 

1,630.000 

1.145.500 

772.000 

010.200 



13.812.100 



Flax Sbxd. 



Received. 
Bu. 



40,500 

96,000 

47.000 

27,500 

41,400 

125.700 

56.800 

72.000 

54,600 

122.100 

121,600 

144.400 



959.500 



Shipped. 
Bu. 



11.300 
12.700 

6.000 

7.500 
11,200 
11.650 
15,860 

2,400 
16.000 
52,000 
12,600 

6.400 



165,600 



93 



SALT AND SEEDS. 



Range of prices far each week during 1911 



January .. 
Febnmry . 

April WW 
May.*.*.*.*.* 
June 

July.;'.;.*; 

Ausuat •• • 
September 

October .' .' 
NoYember 
December 



6 
13 
20 
27 

3 
10 
17 
24 

3 
10 
17 
24 
31 

7 
14 
21 
28 

5 
12 
19 
26 

2 

9 
16 
23 
80 

7 
14 
21 
28 

4 
11 
18 
25 

1 

8 
15 
22 
20 

6 
13 
20 
27 

3 
10 
17 
24 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 



SAi;r, 
Per Brl. 



Medium. 



77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 



Qranulated. 



72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
77 
77 
77 
77 

n 

77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
77 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 
82 



Seeds, 
Per 100 Lbs. 



Clover, 
poor to prime 
contract. 






; 900 @ 

900 g 
9 00 ^ 
900 g 
900 @ 
9 00 @ 
900 ® 
900 @ 
900 @ 
900® 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
8 00 
800 @ 
800 @ 
8 00 @ 
800 @ 

8 00 
800 
800 @ 

9 00 @ 
900 
9 00 
900 
9 60 

10 60 

11 00 @ 

12 00 @ 

13 00 @ 
12 60@ 
12 75 @ 

12 75 @ 

13 00 @ 
13 00 
13 00 
13 00 @ 
13 25 
13 50 
13 50 
13 50 
13 50 
13 00 
18 50 
13 50 
13 50 



@ 



@ 



@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 



13 50 (^ 



16 00 
15 00 
15 25 
14 90 
14 75 
14 75 
14 85 

14 85 

15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 75 
15 50 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
15 50 
15 50 

15 75 

16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
15 75 

15 75 

16 50 
16 50 
15 50 
15 50 

15 50 

16 50 

18 00 

19 00 

19 50 

20 50 
20 25 

19 50 

20 25 
20 00 
20 50 
20 50 
20 75 
20 50 
20 75 
20 75 
20 50 
20 50 
20 75 
20 75 
20 75 
20 75 
20 75 
20 75 



Timothy. 

poor to pnme 

eon tract 



900 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 00 
00 



00 @ 
75 @ 
00@ 
00 @ 
00 @ 
00@ 



00 
00 
00 
00 

10 00 

11 00 

1 



00 @ 
00@ 

@ 

@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 



LO 
10 
10 

11 

LO 

LI 
11 
12 
L2 
12 
11 
11 
11 
12 
12 
L2 
L2 
L2 



00 
00 
00 
10 00 



00 
15 
60 
00 
60 
00 
50 
50 
60 
50 
70 
70 
75 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
2 00 

2 00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
75 

3 50 
3 50 
3 50 
3 60 

75 
00 
50 
00 
00 
50 
00 
25 
25 
75 
6 00 
5 75 

5 75 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 25 
6 50 
6 25 
6 50 
6 75 



L2 

L2 
12 

il 
11 
LI 



13 
14 

14 
L5 
15 
L5 
L5 
L5 
L5 
L5 



94 



BEANS AND POTATOES. 

Range of prices for each week during 1911, 



January 

February 

• • • • 

• • • • 

• • • • 
March .. 

April.. . . 

May .. . .' 
Jttue ... 



7 
14 
21 
28 

4 
11 
18 
25 

4 
11 
18 
25 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 

6 
13 
20 
27 

3 
10 
17 
24 



Beanb. 



Pea, 

commoa to 

fine, 

per bu. 



85 


^ 


2 18 


95 


@ 


2 18 


95 


@ 


2 18 


95 


@ 


2 18 


95 


^ 


2 18 


05 




2 10 


05 


@ 


2 10 


90 


® 


2 10 


90 


@ 


205 


7» 


^ 


205 


70 


(d^ 


1 93 


76 


^ 


1 93 


76 


^ 


2 05 


85 


® 


2 10 


95 




2 10 


90 


(^ 


2 10 


90 


^ 


2 05 


90 


@ 


205 


90 


® 


2 15 


95 


@ 


2 18 


85 


@ 


2 18 


85 


@ 


200 


85 


^ 


200 


85 


® 


200 


85 


@ 


2 38 



Potato Be. 

Fair to 

fancy, 

per bu. 



30 ^ 45 

35 § 48 
38 @ 51 
40 ® 51 
40 § 48 
40 § 60 
40 g 60 
40 @ 47 

36 @ 45 
35 @ 42 

35 @ 42 

36 @ 50 
38 (^ 56 
50 (^ 65 

45 @ 66 

47 (^ 60 

46 @ 60 

48 ^ 65 
40 @ 60 
35 @ 75 
30 @ 43 
30 @*1 20 
40 @ 1 60 
85 @ 2 25 
75 @ 2 25 



July 

Aosuat 

September ... 

October 

Pfovember. . . . 
December ... . 



1 

8 
15 
22 
29 

5 
12 
19 
26 

2 

9 
16 
23 
80 

7 
14 
21 
28 

4 
11 
18 
25 

2 

9 
16 
23 
30 



Beans. 



Pea, 
common to 
fine, 
per bu. 




Potato jce. 

Fair to 

fancy, 

per bu. 



60 
80 

iw' 

1 30 



1 80 
1 30 



1 23 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
90 
75 
75 
57 
55 
60 
53 
47 
56 
60 
63 
72 
80 
78 
78 
70 
75 
82 



@ 1 65 
@ 1 55 

1 

1 

1 






50 
36 

30 









1 30 

1 30 

1 10 

1 10 

90 

75 

86 

85 

80 

80 

72 

88 

87 

95 

86 

88 

1 00 

90 

96 



♦New crop. 



CURRENT PRICES FOR COAL AND COKE. 

(DELIVERED IN OHIOAGO ON OARS.) 

For each month during 1911. 

(Oompiled by Orerar, OUnch & Oo.) 





• 

1 


• 


1 

< 

14 82 
422 

2 60 

3 50 
3 00 
3 00 
2 25 
260 
2 25 
330 


• 

1 

< 


1 


• 


• 


< 


i 
1 

a 


i 

S 

o 
O 


• 

f 

S5 


• 


COKB. 

Youghiogheny- f Foundry. 
Oonnellsvllle ( Furnace . 

BrruMiNous coax*. 
Majestic 


$4 66 
405 

2 75 
860 
800 

3 00 

2 25 
250 
225 

3 30 


14 75 
4 12 

260 
3 50 
300 
300 
225 
260 

2 25 

3 30 


14 75 
4 82 

2 60 

3 40 
300 
2 80 
2 25 
240 

2 15 

3 16 


14 66 
4 15 

260 
3 40 
300 
2 80 
2 15 
2 30 

2 15 

3 16 


14 60 
4 10 

2 50 
340 
300 
280 
2 15 
2 30 

2 15 

3 15 


14 65 

4 10 

250 
340 
3 00 
280 
2 16 
230 

2 16 

3 15 


14 65 

4 18 

2 60 
340 
8 00 
280 
2 15 
2 30 

2 15 

3 15 


14 50 
4 16 

260 
360 
300 
300 
2 25 
240 

2 25 

3 15 


14 60 
4 16 

2 75 
360 
300 
300 
240 

2 60 
260 

3 15 


14 55 

4 16 

2 76 
360 
300 
300 
230 
2 60 
250 
8 15 


$4 60 
483 

260 


Youghiogheny 


340 


West Virginia 


300 


Indiana biook 


800 


Indiana bituminous. 

Southern Illinois 


2 30 
260 


Central Illinois 


225 


Pocahontas and New River 


3 16 



HIDES AND WOOL. 

Reeeiptt and ghipmenU t>f Mete proivseix Awrvng 1911, by routes. 





Hmu. 


Wool. 




•"rsr" 


SM^. 


RtMtived. 


S.j^. 




100,000 

si 

isImiIboo 


89,000 
877,000 




'■'W 








IS 

iT.K»:iOO 
























s,«8o,oao 

1.407.000 


30.961,600 


M38.100 
















"S 






1,130,000 






7I>,000 




«,72S.1D0 

J,8»7,100 


iOHOOO 

iH.ese,700 


i,wejoo 














iM,i3aem 


m,7M,W0 


71,810,800 


119,688.600 





HIDES AND WOOL. 

Seceiplg and Bkipmenla of these products during 1911, by monthg- 





UlDH. 


Wool. 




RecavKl. 
Lb«, 


Shi^ 


Rcodved. 


Shj52«i. 




I 

00 

i 


X 00 

i ! 

i i 
i i 


1 IDO 

i i 

t loo 






















































166.130.800 


1H.7H.II00 


71,810,800 









96 

CASH PRICES FOR TWO YEARS. 

The following table exhibits the opening, highest, lowert and closing cash prices, on the regolar market, for the 
artadfs named (monthly) for 1911, and the highest azid lowest prices for 1910. 



REGULAR WHEAT. PER BUSHEL. 





1911. 


1910. 


Moinu 


Open- 
ing. 


Hi^ 
est 


Lowest 

• 


Clo»- 
ing. 


High- 
est. 


Lowest 


Jan 


1 .93H 


11.12 


1 .92h 


% .93 


I1.27H 


*i:}?^ 


Feb 


.98H 


1.07 


.86 


.87 


1.27H 


March.. 


.87 


1.02 


.83k 


.8474 


1.25 


1.13 


April.... 
Nlay 


.86H 


1.04 


.90H 


1.21 


IWH 


.90^ 


1.06 


.90^ 


.91 


1.19M 


.98 


June.... 


.90H 


1.03 


.86 


.89 


1.14 


.97^ 
.98V? 


July 


.89 


1.08^ 


:^ 


.S7H 


1.29H 


Aug 


.97^ 


1.15 


.88«i 


1.25H 


.99H 


Sept... 


.89H 


1.12 


.89H 


.941^ 


1.17 


.95M 


Oct 


.94^ 


1.17 


.94k 


.96 


1.14 


■91H 


Nov 


.96 


1.12 


.90H 


.92*i 


1.09 


.89H 


Dee 


WH 


1.10 


.91H 


.93 


.95^ 


.90 



CX)NTRACT CORN, PER BUSHEL. 



Jan 

Feb 

March.. 

April 

May — 

June 

July. . . . 

Aug 

Sept ... 

Oct 

Nov. . . . 
l>ec 



.46 


.47H 


.45H 


.46^4 


.68 


.46^ 


.48 


.45H 
.45^ 


.45^ 
.46H 


.66H 


.46 


.48 


.65 


MH 


.53K 


.46 


.52»4 


.61 


.54 


.55H 


.52« 


•MH 


.63 


:iJ^ 


.5»H 


.53H 


.59 


.60H 


.67 


.59M 


.63 


MH 


.63 


.65^ 


.62«4 


.65 


.67H 


MH 


.69 


.65H 


MH 


.60 


.75 


MH 


.73H 


.52H 


.73H 


.76 


.69 


.69H 


.52 


.69 


.71 


.68 


.68 


.50 



.63 
.60 
MH 
.56 

!59^ 

.68^ 
.50*^ 
.47H 
.47H 



CONTRACT OATS, PER BUSHEL. 



Jan 


.31H» 


.32^ 


MH 


.31H 


.484 


.46k 


Feb 


.303i 


.3m 


.30 


.30 


.49 


March.. 


.30 


.30^ 


.28'/g 


.29H 


.474 


.43 


April — 
May .... 


.29H 


.32h 


.29H 


.314 


.434 


.414 


.31Ji 


.36 


SlJi 


.344 


.434 


.364 


June — 


.36 


.43K 


.35H 


.424 


.404 


.35 


July. . . . 


AZH 


.46»/4 


.38V4 


.384 


.444 


.38»4' 


Aug 


.39*^ 


.42H 


.39*4 


.424 


.38«^ 


.323^ 
.314 


8<9)t ... 


A2H 


.46 


A2H 


.45'^ 


.344 


Oct 


.46*4' 


.47« 
.47H 


.454 


.454 


.32»/i 


.29*^ 


Nov. . . . 


.45H 


AiH 


.47 


.31«/4 


.304 


Dec 


.474 


.47^ 


.46h 


.464 


.324 


.31 



No. 2 RYE, PER BUSHEL. 



Jan — 

Feb... 

March 

April.. 

May.. 

June.. 

July.. 

Aug... 

Sept. . 

Oct... 

Nov... 

Dec... 



.82 


.86 


.81 


.824 


.82 


.824 


.84 


.80 


.84 


.82 


.85 


.93 


.85 


.91 


.80 


.91 


1.00 


.90 


1.00 


.804 


1.02 


1.13 


.90 


.914 


.80 


.92 


.93 


.87 


.87 


.77 


.87 


.87 


.804 


.814 


.80 


.824 


• 874 


.824 


.854 


.78 


.86 


.964 


.854 


.96 


.744 


.964 


.98 


• 954 


.95«4 


.774 


.95 


1.00 


.90 


.914 


.804 


.92 


.94 


.91 


.92 


.814 



.79 
.80 

.78 

.774 

.74 

.74 

.74 

.72 

.724 

• 744 

.77 

.80 



MESS PORK, PER BARREL. 



Jan 

Feb... 

March 

April . . 

May., 

June.. 

July.. 

Aug... 

Sept . 

Oct... 

Nov. . 

Dec... 



19.874 

20.25 

19.30 

16.00 

15.55 

15.00 

15.75 

17.20 

16.874 

14.874 

15.574 

15.874 



21. 

21. 

19. 

16. 

17, 

16 

17 

18 

15 

16 

16 

16 



00 
50 
50 
50 
50 
00 
50 
124 

874 
00 
50 
50 



19. 

19. 

16. 

15. 

14. 

14. 

15. 

16 

14. 

14 

15 

14 



75 

25 

00 

50 

75 

874 

624 

124 

75 

50 

624 
75 



20. 

19. 

16. 

15. 

14 

15. 

17 

16 

14 

15 

15 

15 



25 

324 

124 

574 

85 

55 

174 

174 

874 

574 

874 

00 



22.50 
24.75 
26.75 
25.75 
23.50 
24.25 
27.00 
24.00 
21.75 
18.75 
18.00 
20.00 



20.25 
21.50 
24.75 
20.65 
21.75 
21.25 
24.00 
21.50 
18.25 
17.25 
17.00 
17.00 



LARD, PER 100 LBS. 



Jan 

Feb... 

March 

April . . 

May.. 

June.. 

July.. 

Aug... 

Sept . 

Oct... 

Nov.. 

Dec... 



7. 
8. 



10.424 
9.75 
9.05 
8.15 

924 
10 

8.274 
8.524 

9.474 
9.00 
9.00 
9.00 



10.674 
9.874 
9.15 

8.174 

8.20 

8.30 

8.60 

9.40 

9.574 

9.10 

9.224 



9.824 
9.00 
8.25 
7.70 

7.924 

8.00 

8.124 

8.524 

8.974 

8.724 

8.974 



9.1741 8-80 



9.824 

9.024 

8.25 

7.924 

8.00 

8.20 

8.474 

9.324 

8.974 

8.80 

9.074 

9.15 



12.80 

13.20 

14.65 

14.00 

13.25 

12.474 

12.274 

12.124 

12.85 

13.10 

11.874 

10.924 



11.70 

11.974 

13.35 

12.00 

12.30 

11.85 

11.55 

11.50 

11.95 

12.55 

9.70 

9.774 



SHORT RIB SIDES. PER 100 LBS. 



Moims 



Jan 

Feb 

March. 
April... 
May... 

June 

July. . . . 
Aug.... 
Sept . . . 

Oct 

Nov. . . , 
Deo... 



1911. 



OpeiH 
ing. 



10.35 

10.60 

9.26 

8.324 
7.65 

7.624 

8.124 

8.20 

8.75 

8.424 

8.024 

8.15 



High- 
est 



10.76 
10.60 

9.60 

8.624 

8.124 

8.50 

8.624 
9.374 
9.25 

8.874 

8.75 

8.50 



Lowest. 



9.874 
8.874 
8.00 

7.374 

7.25 

7.874 

7.624 

7.75 

8.00 

7.75 

7.624 
7.25 



Clos- 
ing. 



10.60 
9.45 
8.324 



65 

624 
874 
8.20 

8.624 

8.40 

8.00 

8.124 
7.8741 



1910. 



High- 
est 



12.00 

12.874 
13.95 

13.624 
13.25 

13.624 

13.374 

12.624 

12.25 

11.75 

10.874 
10.75 



Lowest 



11.10 

11.374 

12.374 

11.62H 

12.124 

12.374 

11.374 

11.00 

10.75 

10.00 

9.00 

9.25 



PRIME TIMOTHY SEED. PER 100 LBS 


• 


Jan 


10.00 


10.70 


10.00 


10.60 


4.20 


3.75 


Feb 


10.60 


12.60 


10.50 


12.00 


4.20 


3.90 


Mardi. . 


12.00 


12.60 


11.25 


11.75 


4.60 


8.70 


April 

May.... 


11.75 


12.00 


11.75 


12.00 


4.60 


4.40 


12.00 


12.00 


12.00 


12.00 


4.40 


4.00 


June 


12.00 


12.00 


12.00 


12.00 


5.00 


4.35 


July 


12.00 


13.25 


12.00 


18.75 


6.00 


5.00 


Aug 


13.50 


15.00 


13.50 


14.50 


7.50 


5.90 


Sept 


14.50 


15.50 


14.60 


15.25 


10.00 


8.00 


Oct 


15.50 


16.00 


15.26 


16.00 


9.60 


8.50 


Nov 


16.00 


16.25 


16.00 


16.25 


9.85 


9.60 


Dec 


16.00 


16.25 


16.00 


16.00 


10.00 


9.85 



PRIME CLOVER SEED. PER 100 LBS. 



Jan 

Feb.... 

March 

April.. 

May.. 

June.. 

July.. 

Aug... 

S^t . 

Oct... 

Nov.. 

Deo... 



15 00 


15.00 


14.75 


14.75 


15.00 


14.75 


15.00 


14.75 


15.00 


14.05 


15.00 


15.50 


14.75 


15.40 


13.60 


14.75 


15.50 


14.75 


15.50 


12.50 


15.50 


16.00 


15.50 


16.00 


11.25 


15.75 


16.50 


15.75 


16.25 


11.50 


16.25 


18.00 


16.25 


18.00 


12.85 


18.00 


20 25 


18.00 


20.00 


15.50 


20.00 


20.50 


19.50 


20.50 


17.00 


20.50 


20.75 


20.50 


20.75 


15.50 


20.75 


20.75 


20.50 


20.75 


14.30 


20.50 


20.75 


20.50 


20.50 


15.00 



14.15 
13.35 
11.75 
11.25 
11.25 
11.26 
11.50 
12.85 
15.50 
14.25 
14.30 
14.30 





No. 1 FLAX SEED. PER BUSHEL. 




Jan 


2.384 


2.574 


2.37 


2.55 


2.16 


1.92 


Feb 


2.554 


2. 614 


2.54 


2.55 


2.12 


2.04 


March.. 


2.53 


2.56 


2.364 
2.394 


2.394 


2.25 


2.094 


April.... 
May.... 


2.394 


2.514 


2.42 


2.334 


2.20 


2.42 


2.42 


2.254 


2.254 


2.324 


^!i^ 


June.. . . 










2.08 
2.45 


1.75 


July. . . . 










1.974 


Aug 


2.35 


2.57 


2.35 


2 50 


2.38 


2.23 


Sept 


2.42 


2.564 


2.14 


2.14 


2.72 


2.21 


Oct 


2.17 


2.34 


2.00 


2.00 


2.57 


2.29 


Nov. . . . 


2.04 


2.04 


1.80 


1.80 


2.60 


2.37 


Dec 


1.81 


2.13 


1.91 


2.11 


2.44 


2.224 



No. 1 NORTHWESTERN FLAX SEED. PER BUSHEL. 



Jan 


2.514 


2.704 


2.50 


2.704 


2.26 


2.02 


Feb 


2.684 


2.744 


2.67 


2.68 


2.22 


2.14 


March . . 


2.66 


2.60 


2.474 


2.514 


2.35 


2.194 


April — 
May... 


2.514 


2.634 


2.514 


2.55 


2.434 


2.30 


2.55 


2.55 


2.55 


2.55 


2.424 


2.044 


June. . . 










2.18 
2.55 
2574 


1.85 


July. . . . 










2.074 


Aug 


2.50 


2.57 


2.45 


2.51 


2.41 


Sept ... 


2.55 


2.694 


2.27 


2.27 


2.84 


2.34 


Oct 


2.30 


2.47 


2.13 


2.13 


2.70 


2.42 


Nov. . . . 


2.17 


2.17 


1.93 


1.93 


2.73 


2.50 


Dec 


1.94 1 2.16 


1.94 1 2.14 1 


2.57 


2.364 



The following table shows the dates on which the 
highest and lowert prices were reached in 1911; 



ARTICLES. 

Reg. Wheat 

Contract Com... 

Contract Oats ... 

No. 2 Rye 

Timothy Seed . . . . 

No. 1 Flax 

No. 1 Northwest. 
Prime Clover 



Mess Pork. 

Laid 

S.R. Sides. 



HlOHKST. 



Oct. 20.. $1.17 
Nov. 21. .76 

Nov. 22. .474 
May 11. 1.13 
Nov.Dec.16.25 
Feb. 17.. 2. 614 
Feb. 17.. 2.744 
Oct.,Nov. 

Dec... 20.75 
Feb. 6... 21. 50 

Jan. 7... 10.674 
Jan. 6.. 10.75 



LOWWT. 



April 3... 

Jan.-Feb.- 

Mar.... 

Mar. 7 

Feb. 11... 
Jan. 3-11. 
Nov. 29. . 
Nov. 29. . 



$0,834 

.454 
.284 
.80 
10.00 

1.80 

1.93 



Jan.toApr. 14.75 
Oct 16... 14. 50 
April 10... 7.70 
May 16-24. 7.25 



97 
HIDES. 

MonMy rang9 of prices of ikes0 products in ike Chicago markd during 19 U, 

tuith comparisons of previous years* 
Compiled by BJward O. Ray, Western Manager Shoe and Leather Reporter. 



Ohigago 

HlDl 

I per lb. 
1911. 



January 

February 

Ifareh 

April 

May 

June 

July 

AURUSt 

September 

October 

Norember ....... 

ir 

for 1911 . 

for 1910. . 

for 1909 . 

for 11108 . 

for 1907 . 

for 1906 . 

for 1905 . 

for 1004 . 

for 1903 . 

for 1902 . 

for 1901 . 

for 1900 . 

for 1899 . 

for 1898. 
Average for 1897 . 
Averace for 1890 . 
Averace for 1895 . 




IS. 06 
12.97 
12.80 
12.97 
13.60 
15.15 
16.25 
15.75 
16.10 
16.25 
16.43 
16.38 



14.81 
15.29 
10.47 
13.36 
14.55 
15.43 
14.30 
11.66 
11.69 
13.38 
12.37 
11.94 
12.84 
11.50 
9.96 
8.14 
10.20 




11.50 
11.60 



11 
11 



,72 
72 



12.38 
13.98 
14.91 
14.60 
14.94 
15.00 
15.00 
14.87 



13.50 
13.71 
15.49 
12.28 
12.99 
13.99 
13.21 
10.89 
10.57 
12.33 
11.46 
11.04 
11.44 
10.06 
9.14 
7.25 
8.97 




12.75 
12.94 
13.00 
13.19 
13.63 
15.20 
15.56 
15.00 
15.22 
15.25 
15.07 
14.97 






14.82 
14.88 
16.41 
13.86 
13.96 
14.89 
14.44 
12.65 
12.64 
14.41 
12.88 
11.99 
12.07 
10.74 
9.83 
7.44 
9.48 




11.60 
11.94 
12.00 
12.19 
12.63 
14.18 
14.94 
14.18 
15.37 
14.50 
14.50 
14.41 



13.54 
13.77 
15.35 
12.46 
13.26 
14.84 
13.91 
11.67 
11.19 
12.42 
11.53 
11.00 
11.55 
10.43 
8.94 
6.94 
8.60 




11.38 
11.38 
11.50 
11.75 
12.14 
13.85 
14.78 
14.25 
17.03 
14.50 
14.60 
14.44 



13.47 

13.42 

15.29 

12.21 

12.70 

13.65 

13.06 

10.81 

10.54 

12.10 

11.21 

10.49 

10.70 

0.24 

8.28 

6.45 

8.39 



I- I 

r a o 



11.72 
11.94 
11.80 
11.69 
12.31 
14.28 
15.47 
15.25 
15.47 
15.50 
15.45 
15.55 



13.87 
13.79 
15.21 
11.43 
13.10 
14.96 
13.16 
10.60 
10.07 
11.12 
10.66 
10.62 
11.27 
10.84 
9.35 
7.51 
8.76 






11.09 
11.41 
11.52 
11.59 
12.36 
14.17 
15.13 
14.67 
14.92 
15 00 
15.05 
15.03 



13.50 

13.04 

14.83 

11.04 

11.71 

14.84 

13.10 

10.52 

9.64 

10.12 

10.07 

10.44 

10.40 

11.02 

9.74 

7.53 

8.52 



I 

a8 



10.60 
10.78 
11.03 
11.13 
11.47 
13.25 
13.69 
13.28 
13.69 
13.75 
13.85 
14.09 



12.56 

12.40 

14.11 

10.43 

11.96 

14.27 

12.74 

10.28 

9.19 

10.01 

9.87 

10.18 

10.90 

9.72 

8.74 

6.66 

8.00 



•r-g 

5-^ 



10.60 
10.81 
10.55 
10.50 
10.72 
12.33 
13.25 
13.25 
13.28 
18.34 
13.38 
13.22 



12.11 

11.96 

13.10 

10.08 

12.13 

12.21 

10.77 

9.10 

9.61 

10.50 

10.19 

9.93 

10.04 

9.56 

8.27 

6.63 

7.41 



1 

CI 

(£.0 



9.38 



9 
9. 
9. 
9. 



35 
32 
37 
57 



10.76 
11.22 
11.15 
11.88 
11.38 
11.50 
11.59 



10.50 

11.10 

12.04 

8.73 

10.06 

10.56 

9.76 

8.15 

7.69 

9.10 

8.54 

8.42 

8.50 

7.32 

6.86 

5.25 

6.42 



I 



«8 
ft, 



11.395 
11.512 
11.524 
11.610 
12.081 
13.710 
14.520 
14.138 
14.740 
14.447 
14.483 
14.455 



13.218 
11.931 
14.830 
11.583 
12.744 
13.964 
12.847 
10.683 
10.283 
11.549 
10.878 
10.614 
11.021 
10.045 
8.810 
6.980 
8.475 



OHi CAqo 

COUMTBT HiD] 

per lb. 
1011. 



January 

February 

Manrh 

April 

llay 

June 

July 

Auguat 

Septembei 

October 

NoTonber 

er 

for 1911 
for 1910 
for 1909 
Averase for 1908 
Averace for 1907 
Average for 1906 
Average for 1906 
Average for 1004 
Average for 1903 
Average for 1902 
Average for 1901 
Average for 1900 
for 1899 
for 1896 
for 1897 
for 1890 
Average for 1896 



> 
t 



10.98 
10.97 
11.08 
11.12 
11.22 
12.40 
12.88 
12.83 
13.03 
13.38 
13.60 
13.44 



12.24 

12.16 

14.17 

10.61 

12.06 

13.83 

12.47 

10.08 

9.71 

10.99 

10.50 

10.29 

10.79 

10.25 

9.00 

7.20 

8.79 



-8 

III 



9.25 

9.28 

9.50 

9.41 

9.66 

10.85 

11.25 

11.75 

11.75 

11.75 

11.90 

12.30 



10.73 

10.20 

12.55 

8.90 

10.60 

12.48 

11.86 

9.42 

8.82 

9.45 

8.84 

8.75 

9.69 

8.85 

7.77 

6.16 

8.07 



\ 

o S 



9.85 
10.06 
10.34 
10.41 
10.63 
12.15 
12.87 
12.72 
13.00 
13.19 
13.55 
13.12 



11.82 

11.26 

13.40 

0.35 

11.02 

13.49 

11.92 

9.47 

8.66 

9.41 

9.25 

9.30 

10.13 

9.90 

8.65 

6.86 

7.97 



c 



5 






8.44 

8.60 

8.75 

8.50 

8.88 

9.90 

10.25 

10.85 

10.94 

11.31 

11.60 

12.19 



10.02 
9.49 

11.44 
8.04 
9.66 

12.51 

10.03 
8.42 
7.85 
8.56 
8.56 
8.73 
9.56 
8.85 
7.88 
6.21 
7.26 



.0 



o 



9 94 
9.98 
10.35 
10.41 
10.56 
12.25 
12.88 
12.73 
12.81 
13.19 
13.57 
13.12 



11.82 

11.13 

13.24 

9.29 

10.79 

13.43 

11.88 

0.45 

8.59 

8.74 

8.73 

9.11 

10.08 

9.94 

8.86 

6.85 

7.86 



12.80 

11.51 

13.55 

0.75 

10.99 

13.43 

12.14 

9.75 

8.87 

8.83 

8.77 

9.62 

10.43 

10.49 

9.55 

7.43 

8.07 



JO 

o 

2 



9.00 

8.81 

9.29 

9.41 

9.56 

11.18 

11.75 

11.70 

11.91 

12.16 

12.54 

12.15 



0Q 



10.79 

10.02 

12.21 

8.21 

9.64 

12.47 

10.96 

8.49 

7.63 

7.78 

7.73 

8.26 

9.58 

9.43 

8.35 

6.36 

7.36 



8.82 

8.75 

8.90 

9.00 

0.13 

10.30 

11.00 

10.05 

10.75 

10.94 

11.00 

10.61 



10.01 
0.86 

11.13 
7.86 

10.02 

11.20 



9. 
7. 
7. 



.39 
.87 
.75 
8.73 
8.43 
8.05 
8.71 
8.46 
7.45 
5.83 
6.51 



a 



15.22 
15.25 
15.28 
15.41 
15.75 
16.85 
17.00 
16.72 
16.66 
16.75 
17.18 
18.06 



16.34 
16.02 
17.92 
14.17 
14.90 
15.54 
14.84 
13.37 
12.06 
11.89 
11.93 
11.91 
12.84 
12.49 
12.06 
9.10 
11.23 



t 



o 
2: 



12.06 
11.47 
11.50 
11.44 
11.63 
13.40 
13.84 
14.12 
14.31 
14.66 
15.18 
15.16 



13.23 

12.03 

14.11 

10.00 

11.60 

14.06 

12.58 

11.06 

10.16 

9.67 

9.36 

10.16 

10.05 

11.20 

10.50 

7.96 

8.93 



& 



b 

< a 



10.450 
11.424 
10.632 
10.655 
10.867 
12.213 
12.741 
12.812 
12.888 
13.149 
13.472 
13.437 



11.979 

11.373 

13.372 

9.627 

11.136 

13.252 

11.897 

9.734 

9.009 

9.404 

0.210 

9.409 

10.276 

9.986 

9.009 

6.996 

8.205 



98 
POTATOES AND HAY. 

BtceipU and shipments of these prvducta during 1911, by routes. 





POTATOBB. 


Hat. 




Received. 
Bu. 


Shipped. 
Bu. 


Received. 
Tons. 


Shipped. 
TonB. 


Lake 










Ctaloa^o, Indiana ft Southern Ey 


13.200 

7.731.300 

226.600 

70.600 
540.300 


44.300 
354.600 
715,800 
885,600 
194,100 


2,847 

54,804 

14,945 

12,443 

77,291 

7,560 

6.612 

45,930 

18.791 

8,155 

8.150 

9.015 


414 


Chicago & North- Western Railway 


1,754 

1.680 

173 


Illinois Central Railroad 


Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway 


Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 


380 


Chicago & Alton Railroad 




Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad 


181.800 
1.862.200 


955,900 
95,700 


i'.626* 

740 


Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway 


Wabash Railroad (west of Chicago) 




Chicago Great Western Railroad. 


79.500 

41.200 

2.223,200 






Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway 

Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway. . 
Blgln. Joliet & Eastern Railway 


661.500 
7.500 


73 

272 


Chicago, Inaianapolis & Louisville Railway 


46.800 
1.751.000 


312.600 
673.000 


4.664 
12.772 


1,027 


Eastern Lines 


11,099 


Totals 


14.767.700 


4.900.600 


283,979 


1&632 











POTATOES AND HAT. 

Beceipts and shipments of these products during 1911^ by months- 



January.... 
February.., 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November, 
December.. 

Totals 



P0TATOX8. 



Received. 
Bu. 



908.100 

980.200 

1,313.800 

1.123.300 

857.300 

777.300 

218,400 

547.400 

1,528.900 

2.479.900 

2,429.900 

1.603.200 



14,767,700 



Shipped. 
Bu. 



416.000 
882,000 
658,100 
704,700 
394,100 
274,100 
159,700 
170.600 
337.400 
556,000 
472,300 
375.600 



4,900,600 



Hat. 



Received 
Tons. 



19,673 
26,695 
25,654 
16.966 
20.937 
25.329 
11.955 
28.428 
21.578 
27.497 
26.218 
33.049 



283.979 



Shipped. 
Tons. 



1,498 
1,539 
2.265 
1,239 
2,147 
1,073 
925 
685 
1,619 
1,071 
1,477 
3,094 



18.632 



BALED HAY. 

Current prices, by carload lots^ for each monih during 1911. 



Tanimry. . . 
February , 
March . . . , 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . , 
September. 
October. . , 
November , 
December. 



Choice 

Timothy, 

per ton. 



$17 00^21 00 
17 50^19 00 

17 60@19 00 

18 00(^21 00 

20 00@25 50 
22 00@25 00 
24 00@27 00 

21 00@26 00 
21 50@24 00 

21 00(^24 00 

22 00@23 50 
21 00@23 50 



No. 1 

Timothy, 

per ton. 



16 00@20 00 
15 00@17 50 

15 00@17 50 

16 00@19 50 

18 50^23 50 
20 00(^23 50 
22 00^25 00 

19 00@24 00 

18 00@22 00 

19 00@22 00 

20 50@22 00 
20 00®22 00 



No. 2 

and No. 1 

Mixed, 

per ton. 



14 00(^17 50 
13 00@15 50 
13 OOC^IS 00 
13 00(ai7 50 

16 50Ca)21 00 

17 00@20 00 
19 00@22 00 
17 00@21 00 
17 00@20 00 

17 00@20 00 

18 00@20 50 

19 00@20 50 



No. 3 

and No. 2 

Mixed, 

per ton. 



10 00<ai6 00 

11 50^14 00 
10 00(^12 50 
10 00^16 00 
14 00(^19 00 
14 00<^17 50 

14 00^20 00 

15 00§19 00 

14 00(^17 00 

15 00@17 00 

16 00(^19 00 
15 50(^18 50 



Choice 
Prairie, 
per ton. 



13 00®15 50 
11 00^15 50 
11 00(^15 50 
11 00@16 00 
13 00^17 50 

13 00@17 00 

14 00^23 50 

15 50#23 00 

14 00^16 60 

16 50@17 00 

15 00@17 50 
14 50#17 00 



No. 1 
Prairie, 
per Um. 



11 00^14 50 
14 60 
18 00 
14 00 
16 50 
16 50 

00^22 60 
00^22 50 

12 00^16 00 

12 50gl6 00 

13 00@16 50 
12 00^16 00 




13 



LUMBER STATISTICS. 



The Stoekt on hand in lhi» City on the Itl of January in each of Ike year* named 
beUm vxre rtported at foUowi : 



Beeeipts and skipmmta of lumber and shingkt during 19J1. 





LmusiB. 


BHIMOLaB. 




■S^S" 


'SW- 


E^j,™,. 


™Br'- 




Maosa 

4.66H 

Si 

II 


'Is 

1I4,0S2 
a07S 

■*'*9:M3 

"iaHW 

412.M4 


£40 

if 

1 
■■■■■•a 




Ohiosgb. iDdlaoB A Southera Ra11wii7 


'Ji 














SSaWKSiftrpSrsi.-.,-.::-::::::;;- 


"■s 












LBIT 


Mloaeapolia. St. P>dI & Sault 9t». Marie Railway.. 








BIT.S« 






tlllMI 


803.923 


«■•■» 


3U.SBD 





100 



w 

Q 

OQ 

a 

OQ 

cq 



O) 



2 
o 



b 

5 



2L 

8 

a: 

>> 

"8 
1 

a 
5 






■-0. 



|a 



S c g ^ 






coeecQCQCQeoeoooeonoococQ^^^^«^coM«o«oco«oM 



CO 60 CO CO CO 00 CO CQ 00 CO CQ CO CQ CQ CO CO CO 00 00 CO 00 00 CO CO 00 CO 

ao8wQooowwWwOOw3QOQO0aooSoo55o9wwOOQB9 

C« C9 M C« M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M « 



C9C4C4 Co CO CO cococococo ^o9R A ^9 A AnRcoMnSra roco 



SSS:2iS^SS3^i3tSi588SSS8SS88888 
SgSSSSSSSSSS^SSSS$SS$S$$S88888 












8S88888SS8S8Si5^83S^^a9SSS9Sȣ9S9 






.Eft* 



SS^^S^^iS^S$S9S93S^88S888SS8SSS8 
S9S9£9£l?S^S9S^S3SiiS^S^S^S!3S8SSS88S8S888 
SS8SS CO •-4S8*MSn^S8*MS8^ 88*^4^09*^8 

■ •■ ••• •■ • •■■ ***X**«**3k**0* 

■ •• •••■••••• ^ _ • ■ ^~ • • ^ • • *U • ■ ^Q • 

• ••••••••••a ^A * *Q * *S{**S **fl * 

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^ -g.^. 4. ^ < eg o 525 O 

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101 



CHEESE AND BUTTEK. 

Reeeipta and ihipmenta 0/ thcM j/roduM during 1911, by routet. 





Cqbub. 


b™.. 




e™™,. Sljjjd. 


S«dved. 
Lb*. 


Shj^. 


.h. 










1S,1«,IIKI 

■as 


"1» 

1 i 

DO 

M 

1 » 

DO 






t,IM.100 
aB.700 

xa.m 






















iV.wo 

40,MT,»00 


is.MS.oao 














WttMO 






'■M 






1B.O0O 








11.B0O 






TWWO 


tl.SiT.fiOO 










101.07fi,«00 


7S.B32,000 


tU.03I.U0 






, , 



CHEESE AND BUTTER. 

Rte^pU and ahipmmU of these products dunng 1811, by months. 





c™. 






Rm^vmL 
Ll». 


nr"- 


RxHrMl. 


Sld^. 




00 
00 
CO 
00 

oo 

! i 

' 1 


11 

0, w 

} s 


It DO 

i i 
1 I 




^,-::::::::::::::::::::::::;:;:;:::::::::; 


siui-r 










































HM.07S,M0 


78,80.000 


3M.MJ.400 









CHEESE, BUTTER AND ES08. 

Rcrngt of priran for each wiegfc diiring 1911. 



PmlS" 



Pfrlb. 



Ftbruary., . 



liMt... 



Oolobir.... 
November. . . 
Deoember. . 



JT'S 



30 ail 

IT Sl« 



u a It 
13 eu 



M "ais 

IfiMdIt 



OJ^l 



if yai n wbw »■ toltowi 





HKCKii^f^r" 


3.1M,B7S 
2,7W,OM 
2,308,727 

nil 

2! 0301339 

i[msi! 




RrcMpm. 


Snii^iim. 




'is 

,S83,8T8 
.OM.100 




ins! 974 

:™:S! 

,«as.4i7 






B!S::::::::;::::: 




Kg 


l:JS^nS 

























































103 



s 



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CO 



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c«a» 



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108 
AVERAGE FREIGHT CHARGES PER BUSHEL 

Fw the transportation of wheat and com from Chicago to New York for aseries of years. 







OORN. 




Whbat. 






By I ake 
and canal. 


By lake 
and rail. 


By all 

rail. 


Bv lake 
ana canal. 


By lake 
and rail. 


By all 
rail. 


1872 


• .1072 

• .0816 

• .0382 

• .084 
t .0875 
+ .0959 
t .0883 
t .1049 
+ .1341 
t .0777 
t .0672 
t .0803 
+ .0655 
t .063 
t .1»845 
t .0850 
t .0671 
t 0632 
t .0593 
+ .0632 
t .0595 
+ .0718 
t .0498 
t .0450 
+ .0575 
+ .0453 

• .0381 
t .0508 

• .0407 
t .0461 
S .0483 
t .0485 
t .0363 
t .0476 
t .0551 
:; .0612 

; .0562 
I .0487 
t .0459 
t .0487 


.2660 

.2298 

.1888 

.1303 

.1079 

.1406 

.1058 

.1220 

.1443 

.0942 

.1028 

.11 

.065 

.0801 

.1120 

.1120 

.1026 

.0819 

.0738 

.0758 

.0721 

.0797 

.0650 

.0640 

.0615 

.0692 

.0441 

.0583 

.0472 

.0516 

.0551 

.0578 

.0482 

.0519 

.0572 

.0620 

.0579 

.0589 

.0577 

.0520 


3266 
.2803 
.2460 
.2240 
.1574 
.1890 
.1652 
.1456 
.1748 
.1340 
.1350 
.1612 
.1232 
.1232 
.14 
.1470 
.1354 
.126 
.1136 
.1400 
.1296 
.1365 
.1232 
.1020 
.1050 
.1143 
.0980 
.1008 
.0919 
.0921 
.0994 
.1054 
.1038 
.0940 
.0952 
.1017 
.0989 
.0930 
.0820 
.0896 


• .1110 

• .0917 

• .0400 

• .0878 
t .0982 
t .1109 
t .0996 
t .1187 
+ .1313 
t .0867 
t .0723 
t .0901 
+ .07 

t .0654 
t .0910 
t .0960 
t .0705 
t .0602 
t .0676 
t .0605 
t .0645 
t .0766 
t .0511 
t .0486 
t .0619 
t .0522 
t .0445 
t .0581 
t 0449 
t .0511 
± .0526 
t .0540 
t .0473 
t .0553 
t .0603 
1 .0666 
: .0605 
f .0524 
X .0492 
t .0525 


.2060 

.8461 

.1700 

.1380 

.1186 

.1546 

.1200 

.1818 

.1580 

.1040 

.1091 

.1163 

.10 

.0902 

.12 

.12 

.1114 

.0607 

.0858 

.0857 

.0760 

.0648 

.0700 

.0606 

.0661 

.0742 

.0401 

.0663 

.0510 

.0564 

.0589 

.0637 

.0550 

.0640 

.0635 

.0709 

.0660 

.0649 

.0657 

.0536 


.3490 


1873 


3108 


1874 


.8685 


1875 


.8400 


1876 


.1686 


1877 


.8060 


1878 


.1770 


1879 


.1774 


1880 


.1060 


1881 


.1440 


1892 


.1447 


1883 

1884 

1885 


.1680 
.1380 
.1320 


1888 


1600 


1887 


.1575 


1888 


.1450 




.1500 


1890 


.1430 




.1500 


1892 


.1380 




.1463 


1894 


.1880 




.1180 


1896 


.1800 




.1860 


1898 


.1800 


1900 


.1160 
.0006 




.0088 


1902 


.1068 


1908 


.1120 


1904 

1905 


.1118 
.0090 


1906 


.1080 


1907 


.1000 


1908 


.1060 




.0006 


1910 


.0880 


1911 


.0060 



* To Buffalo only. ^ Including Buffalo chargres and tolls, t Exclusive of Buffalo charges. 

FOREIGN FREIGHT RATES. 

Annual average through freight rates on grain, flour and provisions ( per 100 pounds), 
from Chicago to European ports, by all-rail to seaboard and thence by steamers. 







g 1011. 


1010. 


1000. i 


1908. 


Liverpool 


Grain 


.1970 
.2302 
.4588 

.20 

.85 

.4688 

.2092 

.2525 

.4762 

.8026 

.2700 

.4944 

.277 

.50 

.21 

.24 

.49 

.20 

.28 

.48 

.81 

.5697 

.36 

.5978 

.31 

.5566 

.576 

.5875 


.1816 
.1975 
.4538 
.1591 
.8160 
.4688 
.1775 
.2200 
.4768 
.1805 

• • ■ • • 

.4944 
• . • . . 
.5000 

..... 
.4800 

..... 
.4700 

• • • • • 

.6531 

..... 
.6678 

• ■ • * • 

.6301 
.675 


.1893 

.8078 

.4538 

.18 

.81 

.4688 

.1817 

.8150 

.4746 

• ■ • • • 

• • • • • 

.4042 

• ■ • ■ « 

4000 

• • • • • 

• * ■ * ■ 1 

.48 

« • • ■ ^ 

• • • • • 

.47 

• • ■ « ■ a 

.5531 

• • • • ■ 

.6672 

• « • « a ■ 

.5801 
.65 

• • ■ < • 


1901 


Liverpool 


Sacked flour 


8076 


Liverpool 


Provisions 


4857 


Glasgow 


Grain 


1868 


Glassrow 


Sacked flour 


2S 


Glasgow 


Provisions 


4688 


London 


Grain 


1046 


London 


Sacked flour 


2316 


London 


Provisions 

Grain 


.4626 


Antwerp 


• ■ • • • 


Antwerp *. .'. 


Sacked flour 


» • • • « 


Antwerp 


Provisions 


4050 


Hamburg 


Sacked flour 


■ • • • 9 


Hamburg 


Provisions 

Grain 


4040 


Amsterdam 


i ■ • • a 


Amsterdam 


Sacked flour 


k • • • • 


Amsterdam 


Provisions 


45 


Botterdam 


Grain 




Rotterd am 


Sacked flour 

Provisions 




Rotterdam 


.46 


CoDenhairen 


Sacked flour 

Provisions. 


k ft • • ■ 


Copenhagen 

Stockholm 


6S06 


Sacked flour 

Provisions 

Sacked flour 


1 ■ • » « 


Stockholm 

Stettin 


5466 

• « • • 


Stettin 


Pre visions 


6186 


Bordeaux 


Provisions 


66 


Havre 


Provisions 


• ft • • • 



i These are combined rates— Ohicago to seaboard, and thence to destination. 



109 



ALL RAIL EASTWARD BOUND FREIGHT RATES. 

The foUowir^ were iht publisked tariff rates for freight^ in carloads, on the commodUies 
enumeroXed to ike several points herein named, and points common 

iherevsUh, dwring 1911, 



VROM CHICAGO 

AND CHXOAOO JUMCTXONB 

TO 

BA8TBBN AND BBABOABD CITZX8. 

RATES IN CBNT8 PXB 100 IAS. 



o2«2|S| 




<s 






M-e 



S 



:S 



GQK 






111 



g fl ^: 

53cdH 






If- 

fl-§2 

III 



OP 

1 

o 



Grain for domestio use a 

Grain for export a 

Grain products for domestio \ a 

use ( b 

Grain products for export .... a 



10 



lOH 
9.2 



13 

IIH 
13.7 
13.7 
12 



13 



14H 



13.7 
13.7 



14.7 
14.7 



14 

12 

14.7 

14.7 

13 



16H 



16.2 
16.2 



16 
13 

16.7 
16.7 
tl5 



18 
13 
18.7 
18.7 
tl6 



18 

12 

18.7 

18.7 

13 



a—January 1st to September 15th. — Reshipping rates from Chicago Switching District applying 
on shipments from points from which there are no through rates in effect; also on grain receivea by 
boat. 

a — September 15th to December 31st, inclusive — Reshipping rates applicable when no through 
Joint rates are in effect via Chicaij^o and Chicago jxinctions, or when transit privileges under through 
Joint rate have expired. The reshipping rates on grain apply also on shipments received by boat. 

These reshipping rates were the only rates published, except that for a short period in February and 
March local rates were in effect on the following basis. 



To New York Crrr. 





DOMBSTIC. 


Export. 


Grain 


20.5 
21.2 


17.5 


Grain Prodvct^T - r 


tl9.5 







b — ^Proportional rates from Chicago and Chicago Junctions applying on products of min milled 
in transit at Chicago District points or on shipments billed "free account transit" to such points. 



t — Flour, 1 cent 1< 



STOCigOF "CONTRACT" PORK IN CHICAGO 

Ihe foliotiiing table akova the stock of ■'contract" mess pork in Chicago on Ou firtt 
dag of each, month for the past ten years: 





Brla! 


ffi 


'i^,: 


iffi 


SS: 


19M. 

BrLi. 


Bri^ 


ISH. 
Brb. 


Brit 


ISC3. 

Brll 


Juiury 

S1S,T»::;::: 


.374 
1 471 


s 

1D.B92 

i 

1MB 


16.»22 


as 

Si. n 

B.OOI 
2. 01 


18,737 
£0,M7 

II 

til 
11 


s 

:s9i 


Ifl.STB 
2B.84I 

41.»8E 

JB>28 
32i71fl 

as 


1M37 

II 
as 


II 
JiSS 


fj 










!• 




Sep torn b^! '.'.'.'. 

S&::;: 


i 



STOCK OF "CONTRACT" LARD IN CHICAGO. 

Thtfollmoing table shows the sbxA of "contract" lard in Chicago on the first <Jay 
of each month for the past ten y&ira: 





Ittlt. 


1910. 

Tfli. 


S; 


leos. 


C; 


19M. 


To>.' 


T«..' 


S; 


s- 


SS':::::; 


17,7OT 
0.251 

lis 

»!780 
113,813 

70.730 


e,257 

11 

37,822 

17; 113 
30.10* 


15.ME 

TO?" 
3a.'344 

»:S91 
4,912 


!7!9ie 

iii 

Hi 

11 


D',4B4 
28372 

1:!!8 
!iiS! 


UBTO 
4«|SM 

s 


lis 

101.940 

ill 

92^407 
i3.404 


10, 3W 
78,137 

11 

19,109 


ill 

slsoa 

ill 

7e!em 

■si 

19;92D 


J 
\ 

\ 

1 


33S 


















l^-b^::::: 

Ootober 

g=&::;:: 


G29 



STOCK OF SHORT RIB SIDES IN CHICAGO. 

The foUoKing table shotos the stock of short rib eides in Chicago on the first day of 
each motith for the past eight years: 





































^ 








U-. 








X 24 


Wim^ 






































}, S 


u la 


^Bw 








^ 












S-M 


i a 


! !f 


Ji^^ 


S !S 






























































































































'*^'°'"' 








'^*' 















Ill 



CLEARING HOUSE. 

The following table shows the amount of clearings by the associated banks of Chicago 

for each month during the past six years. 







Clearings 1906. 








Clearings. 


Balances. 




Clearings. 


Balances. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


$983,844,841 17 
825,693,382 68 
987,753,448 74 
870.623,641 06 
914,741,308 36 
907,411.986 26 
908,474.563 U 


$79,242,991 75 
58,000,666 47 
56,208,682 87 

53.781.218 40 
64,519.904 25 

60.254.219 16 
60.652.923 37 


August 

September . . . 

October 

November .... 
December .... 

Totals 


$ 886,828,954 24 
841,651,768 51 

1,000,451,400 26 
976,378,958 42 

1,007,457,646 69 


$64,414,704 04 
60,530.874 94 
61,182.512 66 
68,204,879 23 


May 


58,251,122 27 


July 


$11,047,311,894 50 


$735,289,099 40 







dealings 1907. 





Clearings. 


Balances. 




Clearings. 


Balances. 


January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 


$1,040,404,771 88 
927.943,981 89 
1,065,975.562 22 
1.026.743.176 42 
1,120.510,142 41 
l,aiO.270.^94 13 
1,086,805,176 72 


$66,452,585 SO 
.'>8,758,771 37 
62.282,574 62 
64.264,535 39 
87,280,521 62 
60.912.796 97 
70.845,714 10 


August 

September 

October 

November ... 
December 

Totals 


$ 990.647.987 11 
993.333,609 34 

1.168.667.947 86 
821,543,468 75 
814.801.051 35 


$57,654,218 05 
55,825,346 40 
56.927,785 08 
41,824,040 88 
44,379.975 69 


$12,087,647,870 08 


$727,406,863 87 



(^leavings 1908, 



January.. 
February. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 



Clearings. 



$ 947.986,646 82 
866,915,600 24 
1,090,034,016 61 
992,160,346 89 
964,085.644 92 
952,873,903 91 
l,002,$i5,004 15 



Balances. 



$63,689,805 84 
62,106,221 62 
84,328,121 61 
87,624,001 85 
82,608.416 67 
83,481,754 66 
84,706,418 89 





Clearings. 


Balances. 


August 

September — 

October 

November.... 
December 

Total 


$ 902.556,260 11 

971,356,066 08 

1,079,780,730 43 

1,020,216.068 32 

1,183,575.807 08 


$63,303,716 69 
71,790.064 28 
74.141,583 49 
60,524,628 66 
77,371,986 16 


$11,853,814,943 56 


$804,671,514 21 







Clearings 1909. 








Clearings. 


Balances. 




Clearings. 


Balances. 


January 

February 

March 

Anril 


1,122.688.697 43 
1.004.089.852 25 
1,202.801.756 64 
1.116,755.409 18 
1,145.918.456 01 
1.186,719.828 47 
1,175.966.152 98 


$94.75rt.424 82 
82.014,028 44 
73.501,089 64 
70,531,124 50 
02,698.603 98 
92,973,005 14 
99,313,061 09 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 


$1,095,319,510 06 
1,130,347,328 39 
1,218.651,405 51 
1,162,800,081 76 
1.224,941,639 24 


$ 87.649,801 72 

104,084.824 02 

65.495,587 79 

70,508,364 96 


May.!'.! 


60 073,951 89 


June 

July 


$13,781,843,612 86 


$993,499,307 49 







(lenrings 1910. 








Clearings. 


Balances. 




Clearings. 


Balances. 


January 

February 

March 

April 

May 


$1,160,916,011 01 
1,060.330,675 81 
1,341,212,040 94 
1,229,975,961 04 
1,166,717.190 18 
1.182.174.124 88 
1,141,660,827 61 


$61,918,647 60 
64,271,701 82 
80,803,961 85 
70.990,016 50 
72,951,033 91 
66.218,070 42 
72,781,846 47 


August 

September.... 

October 

November. .. 
December 

Totals 


$1,077,147,384 73 
1,080,841,543 29 
1,163.264,467 61 
1,145,087.608 41 
1,201,472,159 02 


$69,840,985 73 
66.801.398 51 
76,318,881 24 
64,456,162 20 
67,262.696 31 


June 

July 




$13,939,689,964 48 


$833,614,902 06 







Clearings 1911. 








Clearings. 


Balances. 




Clearings. 


Balances. 


January 

February 

March 

Anril 


$1,146,387,681 00 
971,708,774 42 
1,287,760,102 42 
1,122,395,339 41 
1,194,672,572 06 
1.169,821.161 12 
1.165,486,110 15 


$69,253,602 47 
58,962,418 82 
78.901,168 98 
75,628,788 87 
82,784.736 97 
79.613,397 29 
97,544.659 28 


August 

September .. . . 

October 

November 

December 

Totals 


$1,113,115,464 25 
1.140,266,067 38 
1,202,760,061 60 
1,170.616,706 45 
1,240,769,762 45 


$72,839,312 87 
78,768,946 14 
77.671,848 13 
65.132,197 24 


May 


78.987,943 24 


tt^fj 




June 

July 


$13,925,709,802 70 


$916,087,020 SO 


W %i*J .......... 





112 
CLEARING HOUSE. 

Wfie follovnng ^lows ihe anumnt of clearings by the Clearing House of the Board of 
Trade of the City of Chicago for each month during the past six years. 







Clearings 1906. 








Clearings. 


Balances. 




Clearings. 


Balances. 


January 

February 

March 

ADrll 


$2,557,233 75 
2,912,U03 75 
4,894.167 50 
8,397,185 00 
4,058.137 25 
5.020,630 25 
4,911,485 25 


S 835,076 06 
1,187,843 63 
2,107,262 95 
1.214,280 70 
1,514.863 18 
2.054.152 21 

67 06-i.681.7 


August 

September 

October 

November.... 
December .... 

Totals 


15,785.371 60 
3,532,073 00 
1,043.388 75 
1.428,988 75 
2,138.7«) 75 


$2,544,504 18 
1,433,864 10 

706.424 48 
546 064 11 


Biay 


862,136 05 


June 

July 


$13,480,450 50 


116.784,093 18 



CkaHnqs 1907. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

January 

February .... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 



Clearings. 



$2,876,915 75 
8,305.812 00 
3.055,302 00 
5,583,188 00 
19,171,386 25 
11,042,438 25 
8,572.703 50 



Balances. 



$1,105,521 43 
1.221,879 53 
1.412.822 85 
1,590.284 85 
6,811,526 76 
3,102,305 75 
2,553.511 12 



August 

September 

October 

November . 
December . 

Totals . 



Clearings. 



$13,286,019 25 

10,667,112 26 

13,238,542 60 

8.9:i&,570 26 

5.951,179 75 



$106,586,118 76 



Balances. 



$4,478,114 67 
8,316,172 44 
4,443,812 28 
2,8i27.923 66 
2,081,402 69 



$34,895,227 97 



Clearings 1908. 



Clearings. 



$5,203,401 75 
8.105,432 50 
6,T75,0T0 00 
5,606.505 25 
8,050.524 25 
6,339.888 75 
8.186.284 75 



Balances. 



$1,909,168 13 
8.108,484 88 
2,102.331 50 
1.836.502 11 
3,101,136 59 
1.948.541 IH 
2.580.101 20 



August . . . 
September 
October... 
November 
December 

Totals . . 



Clearings. 



$7,595,672 00 
8.029,859 50 
4.842.984 50 
8,957.847 50 
5,847,851 25 



$78,!)39.952 00 



Balances. 



$2,851,220 31 
2,756,961 28 
1.474,438 65 
1,443.449 70 
1,966,301 SO 

«28.667.T24 78 



Clearings 1909. 



Clearings. 



t8.046.568 25 
4,377.087 60 
6,493,800 75 

12,100,397 50 

10,091.674 26 
7,373.540 25 

10.001,074 00 



Balances. 



$ 962,230 68 
1,604.485 38 
2,206.849 81 
4,589.858 60 
3,914,733 17 
2,504,423 60 
3,143.777 62 



August.... 
September 
October . . . 
November 
December. 



Totals 



Clearings. 



$10,158,990 75 
7,165,080 26 
5,650.835 25 
5.978,323 00 
8,785.018 75 



91,282,308 50 



Balances. 



$3,121,069 66 
2.417,054 86 
1.919,336 98 
1,721.727 98 
3.069,982 26 



81J266,530 55 



Clearings 1910. 



Clearings. 



$7,530,401 50 
4,664J266 75 
0,000,238 75 

11.434,896 25 
9,257.114 76 

11,075,975 75 
9,646.760 00 



Balances. 



$2,654,345 53 
1,419.697 48 
2,896,213 98 
4.159,692 44 
3,174,363 06 
3,680.932 33 
3.03i.:«2 40 



August ... 
September 
October . . . 
November 
December 

Totals... 



Clearings. 



«6,503,913 75 
7,812,454 75 
6,988,808 66 
6,217,700 07 
4.035,241 04 



$94,167,772 02 



Balances. 



$1,944,913 11 
2,510.904 10 
2,615.297 04 
2,324,822 69 
1,346.315 35 



$31,660,960 51 



CleaHngs 1911. 



Clearings. 



$4,562,073 47 
4.516.852 80 
4.823,491 04 
5,258,886 76 
5,966,664 94 
9,374,785 56 
0,419,476 85 



Balances. 



$1,678,715 10 
1,787,087 94 
1,644,525 46 
1,676,269 46 
2,182,965 02 
2.954.806 97 
3,001.377 50 



August . . . 
September 
October. . . 
November 
December 

Totals . . 



Clearings. 



$5,326,719 55 
4,061,686 91 
3,385,032 26 
4,428.836 63 
3,746,277 87 



$66,770,784 68 



Balances. 



$1,606,960 63 
1,642,132 08 
1,215,683 41 
1,487.083 00 
1,299,859 56 



$22,177,475 63 



z 




116 



THE CHICAGO POSTOFFICE. 

Fottdl and Money Order business transoxsUd during the year 191 1 



DAJfUEL A. Campbell, Postmaster, 



40 Carrier Stations. 4 Other Stations. 277 Numbered Stations. 



CASHIER'S DIVISION. 
Postal receipts for year ended December 31, 1911, as oomi>ared with like receipts for 1910. 



Stamps 

Postal cards 

Envelopes 

2d class postage 

3d and 4th class postage. . 

Postage due 

Box rent, waste paper, etc. 

Totals 



1910. 



$15,414,097 38 

820,918 01 

1,232.647 37 

860,687 17 

685.449 66 

97,754 00 

21.816 85 



$19,023,320 44 



1911. 



116,518.322 86 

820.980 00 

1.202.578 56 

902,042 55 

763.690 86 

99,322 00 

20.437 74 



$20,317,374 57 



Increase in 1911 over 1910 was $1,294,054.13, or 6.8 per cent. 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EMPLOYES. 
December 31, 1910 and 1911. 



Clerks 

Letter carriers 

Substitute clerks (including women) 

Substitute carriers 

Special delivery messengers 

Cleaners 

Letter box mechanics 

Substation clerks 

Substitute laborers 

Substitute printers 

Rural carriers 

Substitute rural carriers 



Totals. 




1911. 



3.418 

1,931 

134 

236 

175 

7 



278 
3 



2 
1 



6,184 



Increase in 1911 over 1910, 43, or .007 per cent. 
CITY DELIVERY DIVISION. 



STATISTICS. 1910-191 1. 



Area of postal district 

Area of free delivery district 

Number of carrier stations 

Number of other stations 

Number of numbered stations 

Number of carriers 

Number of clerks 

Total number deliveries made per day. . 
Total number collections made per day. 

Number letter boxes 

Number package boxes 



1910. 



191.36 sq. mi. 

188.24 sq. mi. 

46 

4 

2n 

1,904 
1,267 
6,070 
2.662 
4,828 
1,006 



1911. 



192.28 sq. mi. 

188.92 sq. mi. 

46 

4 

2n 

1,931 
1,266 
5,086 
2,649 
4,910 
1,111 



Comparative statement of mail handled by Delivery Division during calendar years 1910 and 1911. 



FiBST-cLASs Mail Handlsd. 



Number of mail letters received at Post Office for delivery 

Number of local letters received at Post Office for delivery 

Number of mail letters received at stations other than Postoffice 

Ml for delivery 

Number of local letters received at stations other than Postoffioe 
for delivery 



Total number of letters r ceived for delivery. 



1910. 



266,496,464 
218,042,662 

114,212,770 

93,446,813 



602,198,609 



1911. 



270.048,208 
221.673,911 

110,786.946 

90,014,411 



692,418.471 



116 
THE CHICAGO POSTOFFICE.— Continued. 

CITY DELIVERY DIVIBION— ConUnued. 



2d, 3d and 4th CiiABB Mattbr Handlbd. 



Number of pieces newspapers, drculars, etc.. received at Postoffioe 
for delivery 

Number of pieces, newspapers, circulars, etc., received at stations 
other than Postoffice for delivery 

Total number of newspapers^ circulars, etc., received for delivery. 
Total number of letters received for delivery 

Grand total number of pieces of all classes recdved for delivery. . 



GSMBBAL DbUVBRT. 

Letters and other articles handled 

Letters and other arUdes delivered 

Letters and other articles advertised, stations included 

Letters and other articles advertised and delivered, stations 

included 

Notices sent to publishers 

Other notices, sent to senders or addressees of 2d, 3d or 4th class 

matter , 



Box Dbpartmbnt. 

Lock boxes and drawers rented 

Letters and other articles handled 

Letters and other articles delivered 

Letters and other articles forwarded 

Letters and other articles marked out 



DlBBCTORT BbCTION. 

Letters given directory service, stations included 

Newspapers, etc., given directory service, including stations. 

Addresses supplieafrom directory 

Letters sent to other offices 



Spbcial Dblivbrt Bbctxon. 

Number of messengers in the service 

Letters and packa^s received for delivery 

Local specials received for delivery 



MlBCELLANBOUS. 

*Pouches sent to stations , 

*Pouches rec ived from stations 

*8ack8 received from stations 

*8acks sent to stations 

Changes of address recorded , 

» ♦Decrease in 1911 duo to clowng of stations on Sunday. 



1910 



114.106.688 
15,669,866 



129,666.648 
692,198,609 



821,861167 



1,815.070 
826.680 
851,192 

10.902 
6n.971 

154382 



808 

24.199,288 

28.841,783 

20.600 

848,500 



9.176,612 
840,661 

4.353.922 
126,270 



149 

1.141.981 

840.997 



480.071 
887,777 
736,263 
1,408,389 
8n.063 



1911 



120.757,213 
16.466303 



137324.106 
693.418.471 



829.642377 



1,966.700 
926360 
337.019 

9,561 
595.020 

16S.436 



761 

35.731,110 

26.401,000 

16.606 

323,605 



8337304 
400,177 

3,450,086 
114.906 



176 

1353,680 

279,576 



399,996 
375,178 
701361 
1,360340 
389,122 



AUDITOR'S OFFICE 

Comparative statement of business transacted at named and numbered stations of the Chicago Post- 
office during the calander years 1910 and 1911. 



Year. 


No. of 
Money Orders 


Amount and 
Fees. 


Sale of 
Stamps. 


Recistry 
busmess. 


1911 


1317.331 
1.293.191 


$14,539,818 95 
15.398,771 67 


$7,619,488 73 
7.516,713 10 


1.083.608 


1910 


1,048.458 






Increase 


24.140 




$ 108.n5 63 


36.151 


Decrease 


$ 858.957 72 
5.58% 
(dec.) 






1.86% 
(inc.) 


1.88% 
(inc.) 


3.35% 




(inc.) 



MAILING DIVISION. 
Number of Pouches and Sacks received and 



Despatched. 



Year. 



1911. 
1910. 



Increase... 
Decrease. . 
Percentage. 



Pouches 
Received. 



836.153 
839.829 



3,176 
3,78% 
(dec.) 



Pouches 
Despatched. 



949.062 
899.831 



49,221 



5.47% 
(inc.) 



Sacks 
Received. 



2.673.047 
2,843,615 



170,568 
5.91% 
(dec.) 



Sacks 
Despatched. 



4308,976 
4,716.400 



813,424 
4.53% 
(dec.) 



117 



THE CHICAGO POSTOFFICE— CoNTmuED. 

MAILING DIVISION— Continued. 
Comparative statement showing the amount of mail handled during the calendar years 1910 and 1911. 



Speoial delivery letters and packages j xqiq 

Increase, 1911 

First class y X910 

Increase. 1911 

Second class 1 1910 

Increase, 1911 

Third and Fourth Class { 1910 

Increase, 1911 



Total for all di 
Increase, 1911 



fl911 
11910 



Pieces 
Worked. 



6n.636 
620.613 



67,122 
or 0.21% 



071,136,800 
06^208,240 



14.028.660 
or 1.66% 



461,020,060 
426.317,616 



26.712.446 
or 6.06% 



431.602.300 
306.688.000 



35.014.300 
or 0.08% 



1,864,446.606 
1,777,834,268 



76,612.427 
or 4.31% 



Pounds 
Worked. 



27.106 
24.820 



2,285 
or 0.21% 



20,662.485 
20.344.856 



317.620 
or 1.66% 



0a205.002 
85.063.503 



5.142.480 
or 6.06% 



86.320,460 
70,137.600 



7,182.860 
or 0.08% 



107,216.042 
184.570,770 



12,645,263 
or 6.85% 



MONEY ORDER BUSINESS 



No. of M. O.'s 
issued and paid 



Main Office 1911. 
Main Office 1910. 



Increase... 
Percentage. 



Named and numbered stations 1911. 
Named and numbered stations 1910. 



Increase... 
Decrease... 
Percentage. 



Total Money Order business for 1911. 
Total Money Order business for 1910. 



Increase... 
Percentage. 



16,058,003 
15.850.551 



1,008.542 
6.02% 



1,317,331 
1.203.101 



24,140 



1.86% 
(inc.) 



18,275,424 
17.162,742 



1,122,682 
6.55% 



Amount and 
Fees. 



$100,200,206 60 
07.020.682 25 



$ 3,260.524 35 
3.37% 



$14,530,813 05 
15,308.ni 67 



$ 858,057 72 
5.68% 
(dec.) 



$114,830,020 55 
112.410.453 02 



$ 2,410,566 63 
2.14% 



REGISTRY BUSINESS 
Comparative statement showing operations of the Registry System of the Chicago Postoffice during 

the years 1910 and 1911. 





1910 


1911 


Letters resistered with fee prepaid. 


1,270,433 
814.147 

2.363,646 

465,111 

4,322 

103.616 


1,280.713 


Parcels remstered with fee prepaid 

Rif^gtStereo lAttAra monivAd for dAlivary. ..,...,,,,.,,.,, ^ ...,,, , 


804.420 
2.300.855 


Renstered parcels received for delivery 


503,122 


Reffistered PAAkAMfl rAAAived in trRnsit , , ^ , r t 


56,470 


Offi<nal l^ttATO And pATOAlfl VAgiatArad fv^, , ^ ^ ..,,,,...,,...,,.. . 


148,101 






Tfftal number registered articles handled 


6,030,275 
72,406 


5.102.681 


Increase in 1911 


or 1.44% 



118 



THE CHICAGO POSTOFFICE— Continued. 



INQUIRY DIVISION 



Tracers filed 

Tracer cases dosed '^received*' 

Tracer cases closed "no trace" 

Correspondence cases 

Verbal and telephone inquiries 

Artides found loose in mails 

Articles found loose, sent to Dead Letter Office 

Artides found loose, delivered 

Pieces mailed without postage 

Postage furnished and pieces forwarded 

Boxes rented 

Amount received from box rentals 

Stamps found loose in mails to value of 

Moneys found loose in mails 

Moneys found loose, delivered 

Pieces returned to sender for better direction 

Pieces returned to sender for postage 

Pieces returned without address 

Pieces, address corrected and mail forwarded 

Pieces sent to Dead Letter Office because misdirected, insuffi- 
ciently addressed, refused, insufficiently prepaid or undeliver- 
able for other reason 



1910 



2,170,700 



1911 



64,622 


51,086 


33,936 


32,228 


20,625 


18,858 


10,434 


10.050 


150,572 


72,773 


22,124 


21,769 


7,604 


8.539 


13,063 


13.304 


170,962 


167,316 


110,256 


108,261 


2,736 


3,043 


$12,160.99 


$12,605.12 


2,271.00 


2,249.60 


2,035.35 


1,593.41 


955.28 


658.38 


3,991,212 


5.768.160 


1,598,147 


1,792,932 


289,512 


278.975 


3.271,575 


2,506,605 



2,257.337 



TABLE SHOWING NATIONALITIES OF EMPLOYES OF THE CHICAGO P08TOFFICE 

DECEMBER 31, 1911. 



• 

Natzonautt. 


Clerks. 


Carriers. 


Sub- 
clerks. 


Sub- 
carrier 


Sub- 
laborers. 


Spedal 
delivery 
messen- 
gers. 


Totals. 


Americans 

Irish 


2,860 

116 

152 

40 

45 

42 

26 

32 

31 

10 

18 

12 

4 

4 

3 

5 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1,469 
136 
92 
42 
38 
41 
30 
14 

4 
24 
11 
11 

9 


122 
2 
2 


197 

6 

10 

5 

1 


3 


167 


4.818 
259 


Germans 




1 


267 


Swedes 




87 


Canadianfl. 






1 
1 


85 


English 






84 


Norwegians 








57 


Austriana 


2 
3 
8 
3 






50 


Russians 




3 
1 


42 


Danes 




38 


Bohemians 






33 


Scotch 






23 


Hollanders 




2 
2 

1 






15 


Polish 








7 


Italians 


2 

1 
1 






7 


Luxemburirerff 






6 


French 










4 


Finns 










3 


Roumanians 




1 








3 


Npvii Scotians. . . . 










2 


Belgians. 












2 


Spanish 












1 


Moravians 












1 


Welsh 












1 


Bermuda (Ens.)... 






1 






1 


Lithuanians 












1 


Ise of Malta 










• . . . 


1 


South African 


1 
1 
1 
1 










I 


Gibralter 










............ 


1 


East Indian 












I 


Newf oundlanderp. . 












I 


Hindu 






1 






1 


Filipino 










1 


1 


Swiss 




2 








2 
















Totals 


3.418 


1,931 


134 


235 


3 


175 


5,806 



Increase in Americans over 1910, 56 or 1.2 per cent. 



119 



IRON AND STEEL. 

Average monthly prices in the Chicago market during the past three years. 

(FurnlBhed by The Iron Age.) 



Pio Ibon. 


Northern coke. 

No. 2. 
Per gross ton. 


Superior charcoal 
Per gross ton. 


Southern coke 

No. 2. 
Per gross ton. 




19U. 


1910. 


1909. 


1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


January 

February 


815 50 
15 50 
15 60 

15 25 

16 00 
16 00 
14 88 
14 60 
14 60 
14 44 
14 20 
14 16 


819 00 
19 00 
18 88 
17 60 
17 06 
16 75 
16 66 
16 60 
16 38 
16 06 
16 00 
16 00 


817 26 
16 75 
16 60 
16 50 
16 50 
16 60 

16 90 

17 13 

18 70 

19 00 
19 00 
19 00 


817 88 
17 50 
17 60 
17 60 
17 26 
16 88 
16 60 
16 50 
16 60 
16 50 
16 50 
16 60 


819 60 
19 50 
19 38 
19 00 
18 63 
18 50 
18 60 
18 50 
18 38 
18 12 
18 00 
18 00 


919 fiO 
I9 60 
19 60 
19 50 
19 60 
19 60 
19 60 
19 50 
19 50 
19 60 
19 50 
19 50 


815 a5 

15 35 

16 3.5 
15 35 
15 29 
14 68 
14 35 
14 55 
14 41 
14 3o 
14 85 
14 25 


118 36 
18 36 
17 60 
16 60 
16 23 
15 H5 
15 85 
15 35 
15 35 
15 35 
15 35 
15 35 


817 85 
17 10 


March 


16 28 


April 


15 65 


May 


15 85 


June 


15 85 


July 


16 98 


AuKust 


17 47 


September 


18 25 


October 


19 85 


November 


19 22 


December 


18 35 






Average for year 


814 87 


817 10 


817 50 


816 96 


818 67 


819 60 


814 80 


816 30 


817 80 


Old Matbi 


UAL. 




Old iron rails. 
Per gross ton. 


No.l 

railroad wrought. 

Per net ton. 




1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


January . - t ,, r 


815 00 
16 25 
15 35 
14 69 
14 69 
14 38 
14 25 
14 25 
14 »i 

13 88 

14 75 

15 00 


820 00 
19 25 
19 00 
18 60 
17 62 
17 00 
16 76 
16 25 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 70 


818 81 
18 26 
16 94 
16 10 

16 63 

17 00 

17 00 

18 38 

19 20 

20 75 
20 62 
20 00 


811 75 
12 00 
12 30 
11 69 
11 38 
11 25 
1100 
11 10 
10 94 
10 44 
10 20 
10 75 


814 88 
14 69 
14 46 
14 19 
12 87 
12 75 
12 44 
1194 
1194 
11 75 
11 94 
1166 


813 81 


February 


12 88 


March 


11 43 


April 


11 90 


May 


12 81 


June 


13 38 


July 


18 16 


August 


14 44 


Sentember 


15 35 


October 






15 94 




15 81 


December ^ 


14 75 










Averase for year 


814 67 


817 34 


818 31 


811 23 


812 99 


818 76 






Old Matbbial — ( 


[Continue 


xl. 


Heav; 

P€ 


f cast s 
)T net tc 


icrap. 
>n. 


Heavy melting steel 

scrap. 

Per gross ton. 


• 


1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


January 

February 


812 19 
12 13 
12 25 
11 81 
11 00 
10 75 
10 50 
10 66 
10 10 
10 25 
10 86 
1100 


814 88 
14 88 
14 50 
13 60 
18 13 
13 00 
18 00 
12 75 
12 75 
12 50 
12 60 
12 80 


818 06 
12 75 
12 19 

12 60 

13 31 
13 81 

13 44 

14 06 

14 75 

15 63 

16 12 
14 75 


81175 
12 06 
12 15 
11 75 
10 50 
10 38 
10 69 
1105 
10 70 
10 00 
9 75 
10 25 


816 00 

15 50 

16 00 
14 44 
13 56 
13 15 
12 88 
12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
12 25 
12 10 


813 94 
18 66 




12 13 


Anrll 


12 36 




13 44 


June 


14 50 




14 06 


AqgUB*-, 


15 00 




16 00 


October 


16 43 


November 


16 00 


December ,. - - 


16 00 










Average for year 


81108 


818 32 


813 79 


$10 92 


818 43 


814 45 







120 



IRON AND STEEL— CoKTnnriD. 

Average monOUy prices in the Chicago maribet during the pott three yeart. 

(Furnished by The Iron Aire.) 



Nails and Wirb 


Wire nails. 

Per keg. 

Oarload price. 


Steel cut nails. 

Per keg. 
Carload price. 


Galvanized barb wire. 

Per 100 lbs. 

Carload price. 




1911. 


1910. 


1900. 


1911. 


1910. 


1900. 


1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


January 

F(^b^ua^y. 


tl 89 
1 93 

1 97 
1 98 
1 98 
1 93 
1 88 
1 87 
1 83 
1 82 

ira 

173 


IS 03 
203 
203 
203 
200 
1 98 
1 93 
1 88 
1 88 
1 88 
1 88 
188 


12 18 
2 13 
2 13 
205 
1 83 
1 88 
1 90 
1 98 
1 98 
1 98 
1 98 
203 


11 78 
1 78 
1 83 
1 88 
1 78 
178 
1 78 
1 78 
1 73 
1 68 
163 
1 68 


12 03 
198 
203 
208 
200 
103 
1 88 
183 
183 
1 83 
178 
1 78 


11 93 
103 
1 98 
1 93 
182 
1 83 
1 89 
103 
1 93 
1 98 
198 
1 98 


12 19 
223 
227 
228 
228 
223 
2 18 
2 17 
2 13 
2 12 
S03 
203 


12 33 
283 
283 
233 
233 
232 
224 
2 18 
2 18 
2 18 
2 18 
2 18 


12 58 
2 58 


March 

April 


258 
2 58 


May 

June 


213 
2 18 


July 

Aumist 


220 
2 28 


September 

October 


228 
2 28 


November 


2 38 


December 


240 


Average for year 


SI 88 


1195^ 


12 00 


I175H 


11 91 


1198 


12 18 


12 26 


$2 37 


FiNMBBD Iron and Stbbl 


Soft steel bars. 
Per 100 lbs. 


Structural SI 
per 100 lb 


lapes, 

8. 


Common bar Iron. 

Per 100 lbs. 

Carload price. 




1911. 


1910. 


1900. 


1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


January 


8166 
158 
1 58 
168 
1 58 
1 43 
143 
1 43 
138 
1 25 
115 
120 


H 68 
168 
166 
1 63 
103 
1 63 
1 63 
1 59 
158 
168 
1 58 
1 58 


1158 
153 
188 
184 
I 37 
1 38 
1 45 
151 
157 
1 58 
1 6» 
168 


1158 
1 58 
1 58 
158 
158 
1 55 
1 63 
1 53 
150 
188 
1 38 
138 


11 78 
1 78 
1 75 
173 
I 68 
1 68 
160 
1 58 
1 58 
158 
1 58 
158 


1178 
1 71 
1 48 
1 46 
186 
148 
161 
158 
1 62 
1 68 
1 78 
178 


1130 
180 
128 
125 
123 
1 20 
120 
1 20 
121 
1 17 
115 
1 14 


noo 

160 
1 55 
153 
149 
1 46 
1 40 
189 
1 37 
135 
135 
185 


H 50 


February 


148 


March 


1 38 


April 


128 


May 


1 28 


June 


1 33 


July 


1 35 


August 


1 39 


September 

October 


1 46 
1 53 


November 

December .* 


156 
1 60 






Average for year 


fl 47 


11 62 


H 50 


1150 


11 66 


1169 


1122 


n 45 


1148 



LAKE COMMERCE OF CHICAGO 



FOR THE YEAR 1911 



(Ck>mplled by John C. Ambs, Oollector of Oustoms.) 



Rbcbifts and Shxfhbnts. 

TOKNAGB OF VESSELS ARBIVBD. 

Tonnage of Vessels Cleared. 

Tonnage of the DISTRICT of Chicago, 1911. 

Tonnage of Chicago, 1911. 

Grain Shipments, 1911.— Coastwise, in Transit and Export. 

Exports by Lake, from the Port of Chicago, during 1911. 

In Transit Shipments, 1911. 

Vessels Built in the District of Chicago during 1911. 

Vessels Reported Lost during 1911. 

List of Vessels Owned in the District of Chicago during 1911. 



The following statement shows the dates of the opening of navigation at the Straits of 
Mackinac for a namber of years. The last clearance for Buffalo in 1911 was on November 30. 



1B56 May 1 

1856 May 2 

1857 May 1 

1868 April 6 

1860 April 4 

1800 April 13 

1861 April 26 

1882 April 18 

1863 April 17 

186i April 28 

1866 AprU 21 

1866 April 29 

1867 April 23 

1888 April 19 

869 April 23 

1870 April 18 

1871 April 8 

1872 April 28 

1873 May 1 



1874 April 29 

1876 April 28 

1876 April 28 

1877 AprU 20 

1878 Mar. 14 

1879 April 28 

1880 April 6 

1881 May 4 

1882 April 5 

1883 April 28 

1884 April 28 

1885 May 6 

1886 April 21 

1887 AprU 23 

1888 May 4 

1889 April 6 

1890 Aprtl 8 

1891 April 20 

1892 April 7 



1893 April 16 

1894 Mar. 13 

1896 April 9 

1896 AprU 17 

1897 April 9 

1898 Mar. 28 

1899 April 28 

1900 April 18 

1901 April 15 

1908 Id&T. 27 

1903 Mar. 54 

1904 April 29 

1906 April 18 

1906 April 10 

1907 April 4 

1908 April 24 

1909 April 14 

1910 April 12 

1911 April 18 



122 



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ARRIVALS OF VESSELS IN THE *CHICAGO DISTRICT. 
Shouting the number and tonnage by vumtAs during 1911. 





VeeseU tn the 


lorel^ trade. 


Totals. 


* 


No. 


Tm„,. 


No. 


Tonnage. 


NO. 


TonnM.. 




131 
197 

1 


K! 

MtME 

wi.ioi 

.110,181 

■s?s 

NI7.SO0 






131 

i 

BOO 

,.S! 
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^E^EEEEEE: 


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gssss;:;;;;;;;;:;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;:: 


K 


Totals 


••'■' 


B.fi75.S5G 


-138 


213.231 


i»t 


fi.TST,m 



CLEARANCES OF VESSELS IN THE •CHICAGO DISTRICT— 1911 





TcBseli la tbe 
coasting trade- 


Vessels Id the 
forelsn trsde. 


TotalB. 




No. 


ToDDa«e. 


No. 


Tonnage. 


No. 


Tonnsge. 




i 
1 


10a.t6S 

t£i43 

<»:oBi 

l.iT«,10T 

1,171.0TS 

iSS 






134 

1 
1 

IDS 






















3* 

i 

IB 


11.2H 
73)313 

i 


































TWH 


Totals. 


S.B77 




IDT 




_4»_ 


»»»»., 



ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES IN THE •CHICAGO DISTRICT 
FOR 41 YEARS. 





ArrlvaU. 




Cleu-ances. 




,Sis:. 


Vessel 
ouDnge. 


vM. 






i23ai 

1 

'S 

11 
lii 

1 

IS 

S,1BS 
9.438 

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1911 




leGO.ooi' 



*"ChlCHO District" comprises Chicago, Ulohlgan Oltj, Waukegaa aivl Qary. 



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126 



EXPORTS BY LAKE 

From the port of Chicago during 1911. 



CoKMODrnM. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Plmip 


Bairels 

Bushels..... 

Bushels 

Barrels 

Tons 

Barrels 

Barrels 

Tons 

Tons 

Tons 


21.998 

879,700 

6.124.466 

2.310 

190 

671 

34.007 

1,244 

96,373 

11.008 


$ 04380 


Wheat 


861346 


Com 


WASM. 


Corn and Omt MmI 


8370 


Mill B*fl*f 


2.068 


Pork 


8.70O 


Oil 


76386 


OllOiktt T.-, 


37383 


1tf«.nnf AAtnnMl Iron 


2.161368 


Mdno. nnoliuMifiiKl 


686.478 






ToXmX vaIima. 1911 


S7.763.183 


■ ■ 1910 


i.111,447 


■ ■ 1909 


6,682,941 


• - 1908 


8,771.409 


« « 1907 


6,176,370 


« ■ 1900 


2,300,138 


- ■ 1906 


8,142,030 


« " 1904 


2.011,389 


■ 1003 


3.864,440 


« 1902 


3,347.130 


• • 1901 


7,063.713 


• " 1900 


8,382.466 


■ " 1899 


5.319,197 




9,926.069 



IN TRANSIT SHIPMENTS— 1911. 



CoKMODmS. 



Quantity. 



Flour 

Wheat 

Com , 

Oats 

Mill Stuff 

Manufaotured Iron 



Barrels. 
Bushels. 
Bushels. 
Bushels. 
Tons... 
Tons. . . 



18,:iS3 

305397 

0.163.169 

3,904.746 

18,130 

169 



Statement sho 



howing the number of arrivals and clearances, net tcmnace of VESSELS and tonnace of 
CARQOES received and shipped at the port of Chicago for a series of years. 



Ybab. 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 



Total 
Entrances 

and 
Clearances 



18,512 
16.174 
16.966 
18.274 
15.764 
14.823 
12.922 
13,981 
18.594 
12,836 
11.196 
12.012 
12.202 
11.878 



ToUl Net 
Tonnage of 

VESSELS 

Entered and 

Cleared. 



16,116,426 
12.699,239 
13,990,894 
13.634.904 
14,239,398 
15.032,109 
12.752,691 
14.607.270 
16.406,200 
16.649.036 
14.291.640 
15.300.647 
16.747.479 
15,957.006 



Total 

Tonnage of 

CARGOES 

Received and 

Shipped. 



11.608,980 

9.419.239 

9.656.744 

10,179.619 

9.639,220 

10.847.778 

8.174.331 

9.919.380 

10,302.112 

11.410,470 

19.967,823 

10.379.759 

11.527.621 

10,623,473 



127 



VESSELS BUILT 

In the district of Chicago during 1911, 



ClaBB. 



Gasoline Launch 
Gasoline Launch 
Screw Steam. . . . 
Gasoline Launch 
Gaa. Catamaran. 
Gasoline Yacht.. 
Sorew Steam.... 



Built of 



Wood 

Wood 

Steel 

Wood 

Steel and Wood 

Wood 

Wood 



Name. 



Comet 

Katharina 

Pere Marquette 18, 

Pointer 

Reliance 

Stranger 

Walter CahiU 



Net 
Ton- 
nage. 





14 

1.660 

12 

8 
14 



Cost. 



; 2.000 

6,000 
300,000 
8,000 
2,000 
2,000 
10.000 



VESSELS LAID UP 

In Chicago at the dose of navigation^ 1911. 





Number. 




Number. 


Schooners and barges at Chicago and 

Rmii.li r!Viinmm 


26 
54 
34 


Tugs at Chicago and South Chicago. . 
Total 


18 


Steamers at Cucago 


131 


Steamers at SoutlTChicago 







VESSELS LOST. 

Owned at Chicago, 1911, 



Class 


Name. 


Net 
Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Insur- 
ance. 


Lives 
Lost. 


Remarks. 


Screw Steamer. . . . 


J. D. Marshall. 


428 


110,000 


none 


4 


Foundered June 11, 1011. near 

Gary. Ind., Lake Michigan, 

Founoered February 21. 1911. 


Steam Paddle 


Lola 


10 


1,600 


none 


none 






near Port Arthur, Texas, 














Gulf of Mexico.' 


Steam Paddle 


Tourist 


45 


2,600 


12,000 


none 


Burned August 18, 1011, Calu- 
met River, near Riverdale. 

Stranded and burned July 21. 
1910. near Portage Bay, Lake 


Screw Steamer. . . . 


Trude R. Wiehe 


440 


80,000 


20.000 


none 


























Michigan. 
Stranded July 23. 1911. near 


Sloop Yacht 


Venoedor 


15 


3,000 


none 


none 














Charlevoix, Lake Michigan. 


Screw Steamer. . . . 


Warrington. . . . 


164 


7.000 


none 


none 


Stranded August 21, 1911. near 
Charlevoix, Lake Michigan. 



128 



LAKE COMMERCE OF CHICAGO, 1911 



RECEIPTS 



Coal, Hard 

CoaUSoftl 

Salt 

*Iron Ore. 

Iron, Manufactured 

Cement 

Plaster 

Lumber 

Shingles 

Lath 

Poets 

Railroad Ties 

Telepaph Poles 

Wooid 

Copper 

Hides and Leather.. 

Wool and Hair 

Sugar 

Green Fruit 

Wheat 

Com 

Barley 

Mdse., unclassified.. 



Ton 

Ton 

Ton 

Ton 

Ton 

Ton 

Ton 

Mft. 

M 

M 

Pieces 

Pieces 

Pieces 

Cord 

Ton 

Bales 

Sacks 

Ton 

Ton 

Bush. 

Bush. 

Bush. 

Ton 



Chicago 
RiTer 



622,268 

82.786 

200,184 

48 

64.404 

4.586 

406 

278,427 

4,816 

6,875 

168,264 

726.060 

2.146 

2.526 

0.664 

610 



81.806 
66,480 

148.000 
80.000 
58.000 

710.217 



Calumet 
River 



846,078 
477.807 



4.086,288 
10.266 



20 
1.782 



100 
400 



20 



408,888 
"70,080' 



Total 



060J81 

600,008 

200.184 

4,066.276 

64,660 

4.586 

426 

280.160 

4,816 

6,876 

168,264 

726.060 

2.146 

2.526 

0,764 

1.010 

280 

81.888 

66.480 

641.888 

80,000 

68,000 

781.206 



*Thia is exclusive of 1,306,387 tons Iron Ore received at Gary. 



SHIPMENTS 




Chicago 
River 


Calumet 
River 


Total 


Flour 


Bbls. 
Bush. 
Bush. 
Bush. 
Bush. 

Ton 

Ton 

Ton 
Bales 
BbU. 
Tierces 
BbU. 
Sacks 
Bales 
BbU. 

Ton 

Ton 


2.304.087 

5,538,081 

15.470.842 

5.506.078 

530 

164 

182.287 

8.010 

8 

4,010 

60 

1,850 

8.060 

1,300 

000 

6.348 

446.187 


448.688 

0.060.002 

82,484,606 

6,168,870 


2,837,725 


Wheat 


14,506.078 


Com 


47,064,687 


Oats 


10,760,862 


Flax Seed 


630 


Grass Seed 


20 

26,061 

1,002 


184 


Mill Stuff 


207,288 


OU Cake 


10,002 


Broom Com 


8 


Com and Oat Meal 




4.010 


Lard 




50 


Pork 


101 
2,226 


1.641 


Wool and Hair 


10,846 


Hides and Leather 


1,800 


Oil 


642,180 
64.672 
16.708 


643,170 


^Manufactured Iron 


60,016 


Mdse., unclassified 


461,845 







*This is ezcluuve of 52,120 tons of Manufactured Iron shipped from Gary. 

NUMBER OF VESSELS ENTERED AND CLEARED AT THE PORT OF CHICAGO IN 1011 

AND THEIR REGISTERED TONNAGE. 



ENTERED 


CLEARED 




Number. 


Registered 
Tonnage. 




Number 


Registered 
Tonnage 


Chicago River 

Calumet River. . . . 


4,087 
037 


4,720,402 
3,216,667 


Chicago River... . 
Calumet River. . . . 

Total 


4,783 
1,171 


4,840,010 
3,681.017 


Total 


6,024 


7.036,969 


6.964 


8,021,036 









129 
LIST OF VESSELS 

Owned in the district of CJiicago, December SO^ 1911, 
(Furnished hj John C. Ames, C!olleotor.) 



Steam Vessbla. 
Built of Wood. 

Birmingham 

Black Rock 

C. F. Curtia 

C. W. Endreas 

Carrie A. Ryerson. . . . 
Carter H. Harriaon . . . 

City of London 

Citv of Traverse 

D'Artagnan 

Dixie 

Effie B 

ElU 

Elsie Nell 

F. W. Fletcher 

Fire Queen 

George Burnham 

Helena 

Hugh Stocker 

Imperial 

J. L. Wyland 

James H. Prentice. . . . 

Jesse EnoB 

John Oades 

Junior 

Kalkaska 

L. L. Barth 

L. Edward Hines 

Leslie 

Louis Pahlon 

M. T. Greene 

Manistee 

Marion 

Marshall F. Butters.. . 

Mary M 

Mueller 

N. J. Nessen 

Niko 

Normandie 

O. E. Parks 

Die 

Oscoda 

Owen Rice 

Orion 

P. J. Ralph 

Pere Marquette 3 

Pere Marquette 4 

Pere Marquette 5 

Pere Marquette 6 

Pere Marquette 7 

Peter Coates 

Peters 

Philetus Sawyer 

R. A. Seymour, Jr 

R. P. Eaaton 

Rembha 

Sanilac 

Sapho 

Search Light 

Sea Wing 

Sidney O. Neff 

Silrer Spray 

T. S. Christie 

Thomas A. Benton . . . 

Valiant 

W. G. Harron 

W. H. Sawyer 

Walter Vail 

WiUUmH 

Wisconsin 

William P. Rend 

York State 

72 steam vessels 
(built of wood) 



Net 
tonnage 



16 

1.536 

522 

49 

44 

20 

1.675 

925 

18 

85 

21 

24 

22 

19 

314 

9 

219 

1,578 

21 

43 

18 

398 

16 

1.225 

310 

555 

491 

790 

19 

290 

421 

485 

672 

229 

34 

455 

368 

658 

430 

289 

6 

345 

14 

1,590 

658 

678 

680 

1.296 

303 

112 

20 

561 

308 

103 

13 

22 

209 

13 

80 

27 

338 

64 

471 

84 

22 

42 

581 

536 

26 

625 

1.697 

71 



26.908 



Steam Vessels 
Built of Iron and Steel 

Aeolius 

Alert 

Andrew H. Green 

Arthur H. Hawgood. 

Bonita 

Baltimore 

C. H. Conover 

Chattanooga 

Chili 

Christopher 

Cincinnati 

City of Benton Harbor 

City of Chicago 

Commerce 

Courtney L 

H. Dahlke 

Harvester 

Holland 

Hollis M 

Indiana 

James A. Pugh 

Jesse Spalding 

Keystone 

LowBville 

M. G. Hausler 

Minnesota 

Minnetonka 

Minnekahta 

Nashville 

New York 

Parks Foster 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Puritan 

Price McKinney 

Racine 

Reliance 

Rochester 

Stadacona 

Theodore Roosevelt.. 

United States 

William H. Wolf 

W. R. Woodford 

43 steam vessels. 



Net 
tonnage 



Too Boats 

Alert 

Andy 

C. M. Chamley! . 
C. W. Elphicke . . 
Charles Halliday . 

Chicago 

Dimcan City 

Erie 

F. O. Eamshaw. . 
Frank R. Crane . . 

Fred Drews 

Graham 

H. C. Wild 

Harry C. Lydon. 
Harvey Watson . , 

J. C. Evans 

J. H. Hackley. . . . 
J. W. Callister. . . 

Lorain T 

Louise B 



7 

29 

55 

4,939 

39 

31 

138 

32 

1,845 

3.137 

32 

811 

1.012 

190 

33 

409 

105 

871 

33 

36 

404 

856 

54 

32 

445 

2.109 

2.000 

2.202 

32 

31 

1,475 

31 

31 

1,267 

3,927 

740 

5 

867 

4.654 

1.330 

811 

4,767 

5.245 



47.099 



11 
36 
41 
26 
24 
20 
89 
29 
16 
8 
10 
11 
31 
19 
15 
24 
22 
24 
9 
8 



Luther Loomis 

M. G. Hausler 

Mohawk 

Mosher 

Niagara 

Pandora 

Perfection 

Protection 

Relief 

Richard B 

Rita McDonald 

Roger C. Sullivan . . . . 

S. B. Barker 

T. C. Luta 

T. T. Morf ord 

Tacoma 

Walter Cahill 

William Dickinson . . . . 
Wm. McCarthy 

39 Tugs 



Net 
tonnage 



Canal Boats 
(Steam) 

B. and C 

Brier 

E. H. Heath 

Excelsior 

Fearless 

I. A M. C 

Joliet 

M. Talcott 

Montauk 

Nashotah 

Niagara 

Peerless 

Victor 

13 steam canal boats 



Crrr Fire Boats 
(Steam) 

Chicago 

D. J. Swenie 

Michael W. Conway . . 
Graeme Stewart (steel) 

Illinois (steel) 

Joseph Medill (steel). 

6 city steam fire boats 



14 
36 

6 
34 
16 

6 
42 
30 
20 
33 
47 
36 
131 
70 
67 
39 
14 
49 
64 



1.206 



71 
69 
76 
64 
77 
67 
53 
68 
73 
72 
71 
73 
73 



896 



12 
71 
99 
30 
84 
30 



276 



130 
LIST OF VESSELS— CoKTnojBD. 



Gabolzkb Launches 



Alfred H 

American Eagle . . 

Arthur 

B. B. Dutton 

Belle W. Culbert. 

Bi< Star 

Bowier 

Calumet 

Cheater 

Chicago 

Columbia 

Comet 

CruBo 



le, 



£agl( 

Ecfipse 

Evening Star . . 

Florence 

Four Brothers. , 

Hulda 

Illinois 

Illinois 

Illinois Central , 

Katharina 

Kid 

Leona Heron. . , 

Lucille 

Lucy H 

Mabel T 

Magnolia 

Major Wilcox. . 

Mary 

Mayflower 

Mildred 

Minnie H 

Norma 

Ora et Labora. 

Padfio 

Pioneer 

Pointer 

Robert R 

Sea Gull 

Sunflower 

Teddy 

Uncle Sam 

Welcome 



Net 
tonnage 



45 gasoline launches 



6 

7 

9 

11 

30 

11 

8 

6 

6 

8 

10 

9 

162 

13 

10 

26 

6 

11 

9 

14 

12 

8 

14 

5 

12 

17 

7 

12 

9 

13 

9 

19 

9 

6 

11 

7 

6 

10 

12 

33 

13 

18 

6 

12 

6 



658 



Schoonbb-Babgss 

A. C. Tuxbury 

Alice B. Noms 

Annie M. Peterson.. . . 

Ashland 

Barge No. 1 

C. E. Redfern 

City of Chicago 

Connelly Bros 

D. L. Filer 

Delta 

Emma C. Hutchinson 

Halsted 

Harold 

Helvetia 

Interlaken 

J. I. Case 

Robert L. Fryer 

S. J. Tilden 

Selden E. Marvin 

19 schooner barges. 



Net 
tonnage 



SCHOONEBS 

A. W. Luckey 

Arendal 

Butcher Boy 

Belle Brown 

Carrier 

Cora A 

C. H. Hackley. .. 

Fearless 

George A. Marsh. 
Grace M. Filer. . . 

J. H. Mead 

J. V.Taylor 

John Mee 

Libbie Nau 

LillieE 

Mary A. Gregory. 

Minerva 

Minnie Mueller. . 

Quickstep 

Nellie Johnson . . . 
Sea Gem 



21 schooners 4.226 



645 
589 
590 
956 
1,463 
646 
310 
694 
339 
266 
699 
471 
682 
753 
538 
786 
501 
582 
587 



12.106 



296 
198 
308 
207 
177 
327 
197 
156 
192 
216 
388 
189 
189 
198 
182 
83 
211 
189 
268 
39 
16 



Documented Yachts 
(Steam) 

Cornelia 

Juliet 

Mansanita (steel) 

Pathfinder (steel) 

Rosalia 

Sea Fox 



6 steam yachts. 

(Gasolxke) 

Alice 

Amorita (steel) . . . 

Arapahoe 

Arcadia (steel) . . . 

Avis 

C^thiana 

Diana 

Florence Maul . . . 

Frolic 

Good News 

(Gospel boat) 

Heloise 

Hussar II 

Igloo 

Juanita 

LiUianll 

Marguerita 

Mistral 

Monaloa 

Nais 

Oonas 

Sayona 

Stranger 

Swastika 

Thor Bjom 

Tringa 

Vanadis 

Wanderer 



Net 
tonnage 



27 gasoline yachts . 



(Sail) 

Alice 

Charlotte R 

(jiem 

Hawthorne 

Naiad 

Neva 

Polaris 

Prairie 

SalUe 

Truth (Gospel boat) 

Valmore 

Wilah 

12 sail yachts. . . . 



40 
44 

46 
111 
240 

87 



518 



13 
62 
17 
14 
14 
17 
20 
15 
11 


6 
44 

82 

32 

88 

25 

81 

60 

14 

61 

29 

8 

6 

8 

28 

11 

7 



632 



36 
17 
15 
28 

9 
16 
24 

7 
20 
23 
34 
32 



261 







RECAPITULATION. 




• 


Class 


Number 


Net tons 


Class 


Number 


Net tons 


Steamers, built of wood. . . 


72 
43 
39 
13 
45 
6 
19 


26.908 

47,099 

1.206 

896 

658 

278 

12.106 


Schooners 


21 
45 


4.226 


do built of metal . . 
Tugs 


SU^am yachts 6 518 1 
GasoUne " 27 632 
Sail " 12 261 

Total 


1,411 


Steam canal boats 

Gasoline launches 

Steam city fire boats 

Schooner oarges 




303 


94.788 







131 



CO 
Q 

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O 

Ph 

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t« So to o oc Ok en OD OD QO O 



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s 

O 





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s 


• 

o 


isiii 






§ 


wH 


1891, 
761, 

1.009, 
690, 


959. 
1,078, 
1.259, 


III 


9 04 


3 

1-1 

•• 



ODto t<> t> t> 0% O l> 00 00 C«0 



la 



s 

O 



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^©<5»ft^*BQO^0O"*2j;>2 



I 




132 



CUSTOM HOUSE INSPECTIONS. 

The following shows the business transacted in the InspecU)r''s Division of the 

Chicago Cvstom House during 1911, 



WSIOBBD 

Salt 

Tobaooo 

MiaceUaaeous 

Total 

OAUOBD 

Wine. 

Whiskey 

Brandy 

Gin 

Rum 

Arrao 

Beer 

Olive OU 

OUves 

Soap 

Varnieh 

Carbolacen 

Coal Tar Preparations 

Cider 

Vinegar 

Honey 

Kummel 

Rape Seed OU 

Cherry Juice 

Maple Syrup 

Cod Liver Oil 

Medicinal Preparations 

Fruit Byrup 

Prune Juioe 

Terpinol 

Total Gallons. 

Fox Berries Quarts 

Number of Packages liquor 
Stamped 

CtOABS AMD CIOABXTTBS 

No. Cases 

No. Boxes Stamped 

MSASDRBn 

Plate Glass, square feet 

Tiles, square ft 

Marble, cubic feet 

Lumber, feet 

Lath, pieces 

Ties, Posts and poles, pieces 



POfUMDB 

8,267,808 

2.080,068 

112,222,834 



122.670.265 



GALLONS 
117,080 

40.880 

14.658 

1.751 

1,554 

143 

110.224 

206.266 

280.061 

504 

1,542 

513 

11,424 

164 

6,195 

53 

133 

43 

479 

130 

60 

25 

95 

27 

50 



704.033 



184,068 



0,543 



684 
66.725 



114.740 

10.S38 

2.603 

19.845.467 

8,262.250 

940 



ADMBABURED 

Steam vessels 

GasoUne vessels 

TotaL 

No. ears transferred 

No. cars inspeoted for exi>ort. . 

No. cars discharged 

No. of vessels discharged 



No. of consignments transported 
in bond 



No. consignments rec'd by rail . . . . 
No. consignments rec'd by vessel . . 
No. consignments rec'd by express 
No. consignments rec'd by P. O . . . 



Total consignments . 



RAIL AND 

No. packages transferred 

No. packages inspected for export. 
No. packages transported in bond. 

Total 

No. packages received by rail 

No. packages received by vessel . . . 
No. packages received by express. . 
No. packages received by P. O 

TotaL 



No. pkgs. delivered to consignee. . . 
No. pkgs. delivered to appraiser. . . 
No. pkgs. delivered to warehouse. . 



Total. 



7 
8 



15 



670 

018 

10.391 

876 



1.883 



16.262 

1.390 

8,577 

169 



21.388 



428,711 
848.599 
846.134 



1.118.444 



1,759.330 

242.062 

4.560 

805 



Z006.757 



1,354,518 

88.053 

509.186 



2.006,757 



133 



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134 



IMPORTED MERCHANDISE. 

Statement skowing the valiie of imported merchandise erUered for conswmptiont and 
withdrawals from warehouse, with the amoimt of dviies coUected thereon, 

at the port of Chicago, in 1911. 



DescrlptioD of MerchaDdlse. 



MxBCHANDMi: Frbb ow Dutt: 

Amerioan whiskey returned 

Art works over 20 years old 

Artistic antiquities over 100 years old. . 

Tea 

All other articles, free of duty 

IfBBCHAMDISB SUBJBCT TO DUTT: 

Ale, beer and porter 

Art works 

Automobiles and parts of 

Books, music, printed matter 

Breadstuffs 

Brushes 

Cheese 

Chemicali, drugs, etc 

China and glassware 

Cigars and cigarettes 

Clocks, watches and parts of 

Cocoa and chocolate 

Cutlery 

Diamonds and precious stones 

Dry goods 

Fish, all kinds 

Fruit and nuts, all kinds 

Furs and manufactures of 

Gold and silver, manufactures of 

Guns and firearms 

Hops 

Iron and Steel, manufactures of 

Jewd^ 

Lead Ore 

Leather, manufactures of, gloves 

Leather, manufactures of, all other 

Maple sugar 

Matches 

Matting of straw, etc 

Metals and manufactures of 

Milliners^ goods 

Musical instruments, and parts of 

Oilcloth and linoleum 

Oils 

Paints and varnish 

Paper, manufactures of 

Pickles, sauces and vegetables prepared 

Plate and window glass 

Salt. 

Seeds, plants and bulbs 

Soap 

Smokers' articles, pipes, etc 

Spirits, distilled 

Tobacco, leaf 

Toys and doUs 

mnes. Champagne 

Wines, still 

Wood, lumber 

Wood, manufactures of, all other 

Miscelianeous articles 

Totals 



Value. 



2flb706 00 

7a406 00 

148,333 00 

1,751.742 00 

4,066,317 00 

120,805 00 

87,939 00 

23,543 00 

79,786 00 

372.159 00 

71,326 00 

440.302 00 

998,284 00 

1,267.867 00 

158.319 00 

313.622 00 

8a445 00 

46.263 00 

468,560 00 

6,727,227 00 

923.189 00 

915.651 00 

91,693 00 

99.819 00 

2a22100| 

61,096 00 

541.132 00 

104.091 00 

30,192 00 

854,619 00 

100,584 00 

39,015 00 

61.203 00 

39.884 00 

252,760 00 

558,318 00 

296,154 00 

1&7.702 00 

357.314 00 

58.375 00 

428.618 00 

165.581 00 

80,296 00 

42.479 00 

342,373 00 

67.727 00 

44.128 00 

480,209 00 

1,137.655 00 

600,839 00 

258,993 00 

202.385 00 

529.534 00 

114.842 00 

690.325 00 



Duty. 



128.089,068 00 



24372 12 



63,577 09 

18.190185 

10,594 85 

19,946 50 

115,222 47 

28.530 40 

151,780 85 

202,805 49 

785.477 39 

132.017 67 

07,478 16 

131231 43 

27,509 83 

48.407 89 

8L861,826 14 

198,455 40 

272,987 61 

28,622 02 

56.903 79 

7.955 83 

84,062 77 

190.949 44 

75,746 21 

38.834 24 

391381 09 

28,881 61 

18,321 23 

17,845 02 

22,845 11 

113.151 55 

287.878 13 

133,269 30 

78300 71 

120.960 97 

19.214 06 

109,427 97 

52.650 08 

47.300 88 

9347 84 

60i256 14 

27,784 22 

26.382 06 

616.070 90 

729,262 56 

210393 65 

149,698 94 

107,848 63 

4t998 91 

41,294 08 

248,490 59 



$101181,150 12 



135 



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136 



CANAL STATISTICS (OFFICIAL). 



The following stcttemevU shows the expenses of repairs^ renewals, etc.; aiso the toUs col- 
lected, wUh the dates of the opening and closing of the lUinois and Michigan 
Canal, from 1860 to 1911, inclusive: 



I860. 
1851. 

ia"»5. 

1850. 
1857. 

ia>s. 

1W)9. 
l«(]0. 

is«;i. 
iwa. 

Va'A 

l^(^^). 

18WJ. 

1W57. 

18.58. 

li^«'.) 

IHTO; 

1871. 

1^^73. 

1k;;j. 

1S71. 

1S75. 

Ib70 

1877. 

1878. 

1879. 

1880. 

1881. 

1882. 

1883. 

1884. 

1885. 

1886. 

1887. 

1888. 

1889. 

1890. 

1891. 

1898. 

1893. 

1894. 

189S. 

1896. 

1897. 

1896. 

1899. 

1900 

1901. 

1902. 

1903. 

1904. 

1905 

190d. 

1907. 

1908. 

1909. 

1910. 

1911. 



Ordinary 
repairs. 



Sa8.418 
39,447 
42,816 
40.38:) 
36,587 
38,216 
33,101 
37,256 
86,115 
34,0B96 
34,306 
89,238 
40,024 
49,294 
47.535 
39»255 
48,n6 
46,152 
62.084 
49,614 
43,098 
64,555 
42,785 
63.525 
49,109 
46.241 
42,418 
64,965 
43.826 
44,076 
47,604 
68,597 
67,309 
56,515 
55,731 
47,650 
44,101 
48,509 
43,605 
42,907 
40,258 
43,601 
43.476 
30,063 
36.985 
33,760 
31,541 
31,524 
30.859 
31,768 
31,205 
36.928 
^,403 
21,781 
20. i:^ 
13,334 
10.989 
21,570 
16,825 
13,440 
22,360 
17,304 



Extrard'y 




repairs, 

renewals, 

and hyd. 


Gross 
expenses. 


t^orks. 




$10,906 


858,415 


19,037 


.')8.475 


10,692 


53,508 


4,486 


44,870 


16,654 


63,242 


32,657 


70,873 


58,857 


91,458 


65,825 


108,082 


21,9?i 


68,088 


40,406 


74.432 


48,275 


82,583 


15,823 


66,061 


15,337 


55,362 


13,021 


62,715 


18,572 


66,107 


86,614 


124,869 


72.647 


116.368 


116,504 


162.666 


60.067 


122,062 


42.251 


91,765 


65.607 


108,695 


42,667 


97,222 


46.091 


88,876 


27,578 


81,098 


24.650 


73,798 


28.270 


74,511 


49,167 


91,585 


65.053 


110,018 


89.013 


82,839 


63,625 


97.701 


77,997 


125,601 


64,626 


108,223 


48,103 


105,412 


60,241 


116,756 


43..540 


99,280 


38,734 


8«,3J« 


28,:i29 


72,430 


27,876 


71,385 


83,240 


76,845 


42,571 


85,478 


34,867 


75,125 


29.091 


72,592 


23.661 


67,137 


20.459 


69.522 


17.273 


54.258 


87,392 


71,152 


46,446 


77.987 


86,783 


68,307 


45,103 


75,962 


22,368 


91,196 


36,806 


88.317 


o4.i743 


111,002 


81,599 


127.150 


14.254 


52,401 


6,730 


42,761 


87.558 


50,890 


37,320 


48,523 


13,595 


50.050 


32,923 


60,.H45 




48.294 


12,304 


57,938 


12,571 


39.877 



Tolls. 



$126,504 

173,300 

168.5n 

173.372 

198.326 

180.519 

184,310 

197.830 

197,171 

182.140 

188,664 

218.040 

264,667 

210,386 

156,607 

300.810 

802,958 

252,231 

215,720 

288,750 

149,635 

160,050 

165,874 

166.641 

144,831 

107.081 

113.293 

06.913 

84,330 

89,064 

92,296 

85,130 

85,947 

77,975 

77.102 

66,800 

62.516 

58,024 

66,028 

65,305 

66.112 

49.457 

64.987 

38,702 

44,028 

89,106 

32.100 



41,021 
13,867 
8,120 
2,879 
6,938 
6.743 
4,950 
5,358 
2.126 
2,985 
2,170.41 
3.754 
2.816 



Canal 


Canal 


No. of 


opened. 


closed. 


dajTB 
open. 


Mar. 22 


Deo. 


6 


260 


- 16 


M 


8 


200 


- 29 


m 


8 


266 


- 14 


m 


12 


274 


- 16 


m 


2 


263 


April 3 


m 


12 
4 


258 

241 


May, 1 


Nov. 


20 


204 


April 1 
Mar. 16 


Dee. 


1 


244 


m 


8 


263 


8 


Not. 


26 


264 


■ 4 


« 


28 


270 


April 1 


Deo. 




247 


Mar. 4 


m 


1 


273 


« 10 


m 


1 


265 


April 10 


Nov. 
Oct. 


15 
31 


280 
203 


- 10 


Nov. 


15 


200 


4 


Oct. 


81 


210 


7 


Nov. 


16 


288 


7 


Oct. 


8 


184 


6 


Nov. 


25 


284 


1 


Dec 


1 


246 


« 10 


Nov. 


20 


286 


Mar. 30 


if 


20 


286 


AprU 15 


m 


28 


288 


Mar. 25 


m 


18 


280 


April 16 


Dec 


1 


280 


Mar. 20 


m 


1 


267 


- 29 


Nov. 


20 


287 


• 22 


m 


18 


242 


April 25 


M 


26 


218 


Mar. 13 


m 


30 


8S8 


April 2 


m 


25 


238 


7 


Dec 


1 


280 


* 15 


Nov. 


25 


285 


1 


m 


26 


238 


1 


m 


10 


233 


- 10 1 - 


15 


280 


Mar. 25 
April 1 




22 


238 


1 




16 


289 


1 




15 


889 


1 




16 


289 


1 




15 


229 


1 




15 


289 


1 




15 


289 


1 




15 


229 


1 




15 


220 


• 1 








- 25 




• • 


• • • • 


Mar. 15 


Nov. 


16 


276 


« 15 


Dec 


15 


• • • « 


April 15 
' 16 


« 
Nov. 


1 
16 


2» 

214 


- 16 


if 


15 


814 


1 


« 


16 


289 


1 


ti 


16 


829 


1 


■ 


16 


280 


1 


f< 


16 


220 



137 



ILLINOIS AND MICHIGAN CANAL. 

Number of candlrboats running^ of miles run^ of clearances issued and of tons 
transported on the lUinois and Michigan Canal^ from 1860 to 1911, inclusive: 



I860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1866 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1860 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1876 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1880 
1800 
1801 
1802 
1803 
1804 
1805 
1806 
1807 
1806 
1800 
1000 
1001 
1002 
1008 
1004 
1006 
1006 
1007 
1006 
1000 
1010 
1011 



Clesnnces 
ivued. 



3.926 

6.339 

7,044 

5,810 

4.527 

3,907 

5.488 

4.183 

4.128 

4.524 

2,903 

3.523 

•5,018 

•4,743 

•4,296 

•3,554 

♦4,049 

♦4,008 

•4.299 

•4.458 

•4.536 

•4,459 

•4,055 

•3.789 

•4,204 

•3,990 

•3,783 

•3,824 

•3,326 

•4,299 

•2,920 

•3,203 

•3,014 

•2.452 

•2.907 

•2,904 

•2.660 

•4.151 

•3.523 

•4,705 

•2.820 

•2,366 

♦691 

•1.406 

•1,603 

•1,354 

1,766 

•522 

•1,276 

•1,026 

•1,696 

•1.063 



Boats 
numing. 



201 
194 
211 
240 
228 
228 
230 
209 
218 
219 
179 
186 
173 
172 
152 
142 
145 
145 
140 
136 
133 
133 
132 
132 
134 
135 
130 
132 
127 
114 
104 
97 
95 
82 
81 
8 
t67 
64 
64 
70 
60 
41 
41 
78 
107 
124 
177 
121 
227 
298 
357 
292 



I? 



MUee 
nm. 



235.684 

415,599 

474,976 

418,713 

300,340 

360.614 

406,784 

357.623 

345.109 

285.060 

242.650 

278,948 

334.820 

328.164 

288,075 

259,878 

302.024 

272.788 

293.335 

304,191 

320,000 

316.435 

335.710 

306.618 

325.431 

304,664 

303.575 

290,338 

267,771 

334.107 

260.713 

243,214 

260,149 

187,905 

206,875 

196,132 

167.289 

179,954 

152,960 

173.312 

09,409 

74.923 

25,290 

82.060 

58,839 

40,617 

40,896 

29,994 

40,504 

32,426 

43,234 

20,510 



Tods 
tmnported. 



867,437 
547.296 
673,590 
619,599 
610.286 
616,140 
746.815 
746,954 
737,827 
871,788 
585,870 
629.975 
783.641 
849,533 
712,020 
676,025 
691,943 
605,912 
598.792 
669,659 
751.360 
826.183 
1,011,287 
925.575 
056.721 
827.355 
808.019 
742.074 
751.055 
917.047 
742.392 
641.156 
783,288 
529,816 
617,811 
591,407 
446.762 
484,575 
895,017 
469.352 
121,750 
81.456 
35.824 
62,894 
47,616 
38.820 
35,480 
80.616 
312,500 
352.600 
374,500 
362.662 



♦Includes clearances at Henry and Copperas Creek. 



138 



ILLINOIS AND MICHIGAN CANAL. 

Statement of principal articles transported upon the Illinois and Michigan Canal and 

[t/ie Illinois River, cleared at Collector's Office on the Illinois and Michigan 

Canal and Locks at Henry and Copperas Creek, for 

the year ending November SO, 1911. 





f ARTICLES 


Measure 


Alleles not enumarated 


Lbs. 

Bushels 

Tons 

Miles 

Feet 

Lbs. 

Bushels 

Number 

Bushels 

Bushels 


Corn «««..*.i. 


. 


Coal 


Boats 


Lufnber. , . t . . . , . , 


Merchandise. ...... t 


Oats 


Passengers 


Wheat 


Rye 







(^nal 



20,510 



Henry 



197.000 

99,000 

476 



258,000 

67,000 

1,605 

71.400 

1,000 



Copperas 



244,602 

45,500 

1,152 

8,764 

6.000 



3,394 
113,000 



Total 



441,502 
144,500 

1427 
20,274 

6,000 

258,000 

57.000 

4,900 
184,400 

1.000 



General Statistical Statements 



OF THE 



UNITED STATES AND THE STATE OF ILUNOIS 



INCLUDING THE 



Population, Public Debt, Valuation of Property, Etc 



STATEMENTS OF EXPORTS AND IMPORTS 



GRAIN CROPS. ETC 



140 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES, INCLUDING 
ALASKA, PORTO RICO AND HAWAII. 

G&asuA BeturM, 



1790 3,829.214 

1800 5,908.483 

1810 7,239,881 

1820 9,838,453 

1830 U8,888,020 

1840 17,069,453 

1850 28.191,876 

1860 31.448,321 

1870 38,568,371 

1880 50,155.783 

1890 62,622,2i50 

1900, Jane 1 77,256,630 



1901 (estimated), July 1 79,087,868 

1902 (estimated), Jolj 1 80,662,867 

1903 (estimated), July 1 82,207,846 

1904 (estimated), Jalyl 88,932,836 

1905 (estimated), July 1 85,567,824 

1906 (esUmated), July 1 87,202,813 

1907 (estimated), July 1 88,837,808 

1908 (estimated), July 1 90,472,793 

1909 (estimated),. July 1 92,l(r7,7d8 

1910,Appin6 93,402,161 

19tl (estimated). July 1 95,877,762 



Population of the United States, inclusive of Alaska, the Insular Possessions, Philippine 
Islands, Guam, Samoa and the Canal Zone, in 1910 was about 101.100,000. 

POPULATION OP ILLINOIS. 

United StaJtea Census Betums. 



1810 12.282 

1820 55,162 

1830 157.445 

1840 476,183 

1850 851,470 

1860 1,711,961 

1870 2,539,891 

1880 3,077,871 

1890 3,826,352 



1900 4,821,560 

1904 (estimated), July 1. . /. 5.159,896 

1905 (estimated), July 1 5,242,134 

1906 (estimated), July 1. . . 6,324,872 

1907 (estimated), July 1 6,407.611 

1906 (estimated), July 1 6,490.350 

1910, April 15 6,638,591 

19U (estimated), July 1 6,738,666 



POPULATION OP CHICAGO. 



1836 70 

1840 4,853 

1846 12,088 

1860 29,963 

1856 60,627 

1860 112,172 

1866 178,900 

1870 298.977 

1871 (June) 334,270 

1872 (October) 364,377 

1880 503,185 

1890 1,208,669 



1892 1,438,010 

1894 1,568,727 

1896 1.616,685 

1898 1,861,588 

1900 United States census 1,608,675 

1901 U. S. Census Bureau (estimated) 1,751,968 

1902 U. S. Census Bureau (estimated) 1,801,256 

1903 U. S. Census Bureau (estimated) 1,860,642 

1901 U. S. Census Bureau (estimated) 1,890,829 
1905 U. S. Census Bureau (estimated) 1,949,116 

1910 U. S. Census Bureau 2,185.288 

1911 U. S. Census Bureau (estimated) 2,249,221 



AMEN PASSENGERS AND IMMIGRANTS. 

dumber of aiien paaamgtra arrived in the, United Stales from 1810 to 18BS, and 

the number of immigranla arriixd from 1866 to 191/. 

(Offlcl&l.) 



Tmf 


gdlng September 80- 








BE::^ee;ee. 






























»r 


£r endlne Deuembci SI, 18BE. . 

«.'«■!«-'".■'- 













10, IW 
10J37 
1S.BTS 
£1.393 



TtU43 

Te,S40 
38.BM 



Year endlnR Dec:. 31— Coniloued. 

1833 

1840 

IMl 

IS4i 

January 1 to Seiiteinber 30, 1343.. 
Year ending SepCembet 80- 

1844 

liia/^V/^'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 
Kd 

1843. 

1849 

18S0 

?uarter eodlDg DecemborSl, ISS 
ear ending December 31- 



tBjcm 
80,i)<9 



114,371 
154.416 

334.908 
2f8.5n 

ssn.fst 

siu.a>t 

Ge,STS 
En9,4M 

jai.aa 



ien:::::::;::.:: 






jMO 












J.n.U<,Ju^e«^ 


Yeareodlug Juae 










iiS.-.:-.:..;:;;: 















IBB-BST 
246.e4« 
U9.901 



IflajSE 
247.4S3 
814.S17 
SID.IMS 

138,840 



aOD.43S 

asi,3ot 

1Z3.1SH 



383.074 
We.KO 
342.809 



197.9!>4 

ogs.iB3 



914.407 
279.M8 
343.Z87 



044. BSS 

643.687 
347,407 



1K4,8« 
941,230 
I.lll8,as7 
1.030,300 



le year 



the y ear 1«20 ■ 
[Xjriirwas keiii 



u) 250.000. 



Ing In tbe Unl 



eupaseeaeers were kept, 
d Stales from tbe toun- 



I la distinction from tl 



It Is estimated, howe 
datlnn of the gOTsra 

Op to the year 13 
allea poitseDgen 

Of tbe number of Immlgrante arrived daring tbeyear ended JuneSO, IBll, there oame from 

Dn'dKlngdom 102.488 Norway 13,980 Aua.Hungary lBfl,0S7 

Germany 32,001 China l,4ao Sweden 20.780 

Italy (Including Slolly and 9ardlDlal..lB2.e8t RosalaD Empire 188,721 

The total number of European ImmlgrantH for the lust flacal year was 784.787. 

Of tbe total number of Immigrants for Che year. 670.057 were males aodBOB.saO were fomalee. 

Theyearended Juneao, 1B07, haa boon tbe year of the greatest Immigration. 

Owing to the absence of law for the collection of statistics In relation to Immigrants by 
rallroads.tboee from tbaBrltlsh North American pOBBeaaloD«and(romUeilco were not Included 
from July 1, 1888, to June 90, 18»6. 

a Data not collected. 



142 



♦PUBLIC DEBT OF THE UNITED STATES. 



7he foUowing atatemeni exhibits the amount of the debt of the United States Qovem' 

ment in each year since 1790: 



1791 

1782 

1793 

1794 

1795 

1796 

1797 

1798 

1799 

1800 

1801 

1802 

1806 

1804 

1805 

1806 

1807 

1808 

1809 

1810 

1811 

1812 

1813 

1814 

1816 

1816 

1817 

1818 

1819 

1820 

1821 

1822 

1833 

1824 

1825 

1826 

1827 

1828 

1829 

1830 

1831 

1832 

1838 

1834 

1835 

1836 

1887 

1838 

1889 

1840 

1841 

1842 

1843 

1844 

1845 

1846 

1847 

1848 

1849 

1850 

1851 



January 1 



July 1. 



December 1 . . 

1.. 

November 30. 



; 75,463.476 52 
77,^7,924 66 
80,352,634 04 
78,427,404 77 
80,747,587 38 
83,762,172 07 
82,064,479 33 
79,228,529 12 
78.408,669 77 
82,976.294 35 
83.038,050 80 
80,712,632 25 
77,064,686 30 
66,427,120 88 
82.312,150 50 
75,723,270 66 
69,218.398 64 
65,196,317 97 
57,023,192 09 
53.173,217 52 
48,005.587 76 
46,209,737 90 
55.962,827 57 
81.487,846 24 
99,8a3,6(K) 15 
127,334,933 74 
123.491,965 16 
103,466,633 83 
95,529,648 28 
91,015,566 15 
89,987,427 66 
93.546,676 98 
90,875,877 27 
90,269,777 77 
83,788,432 71 
81,064.059 99 
73,987.357 20 
67,475,043 87 
58.421,413 67 
48,565,406 50 
39,123,191 68 
24,322,235 18 
7,001,082 88 
4.760,081 08 
351,289 05 
291,089 05 
1,878,223 56 
4,857,660 46 
11,983,737 53 
5,125.077 63 
6,737,.398 00 
15,028,486 37 
27,203,450 69 
24,748.188 23 
17.093,794 80 
16,750,926 33 
38,956,623 88 
48,526,379 37 
64,704,693 71 
64,228,22i8 37 
e:2.5(50,3S«5 26 



1852 
1863 
1864 

1856 

1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1866 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1886 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

IWO 

1901 

1902 

1908 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 



December 20. 
July 1 



November 17. 

15. 

Julyl 



January 1 



I 65.131.692 13 

67.340.628 78 

47.242.906 06 

39.969.731 06 

30.963.909 64 

29.060.386 90 

44.910.777 66 

58.764,699 33 

64.769,703 06 

90.867,828 68 

514,211.371 92 

1.008.793.181 37 

1.740.690.489 49 

2,682,593,026 63 

2,783.425.879 21 

2,692.199.216 12 

2.636.320.964 67 

2.489.002,480 58 

2,386,368.599 74 

2,332.067,793 75 

2.243.838.411 14 

2.162,252.338 12 

2,159.315.326 17 

2.142.598,302 02 

2419.832.195 27 

2.092.921.241 81 

2.045,956,442 70 

S.028.648,U1 09 

2.011,798,504 87 

1.899,181.ri{6 99 

1,7(5,491,717 09 

1.607.543,676 84 

1.496,041.723 80 

1.418.548.371 40 

1.378,831,314 72 

1.277,360.963 97 

1.160.954.889 99 

1,0:^6.934.261 67 

930.231.765 29 

862,430.541 67 

795.824,773 29 

794.210.786 67 

830,308.640 10 

871,621.090 08 

906.770.687 78 

948,595,982 48 

960,161,899 82 

1,046,967,413 66 

1,056.868.821 45 

1,012.039.473 56 

926.067.931 29 

857.066.928 26 

823.232.662 23 

892,823.469 16 

891,603.723 88 

817.080,888 04 

767,771.026 70 

874.riJ7.277 10 

834.566.128 89 

929.082.490 51 

936,761.727 86 



* NoTH — Since 1869 the cash in the treasury is deducted from the aggregate debt. Bonds 
issued in aid of the Pacific railroads are not included. 



143 



PUBLIC DEBT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

December SO. 1911. 



INTBBB8T-BKABINO DBBT. 



Title of loan. 


Rate. 


When 
issued 


Amount 
issued. 


Outstanding 
Dec. 31, 1011 


Consols of 1930 


4% 

8% 
2H% 


1900 

1898 

1896-1896 

1906 
1908 
1911 

1911 


1 646,260,150 00 
198.792,660 00 
162,315.400 00 

54,631.080 00 
30.000,000 00 
50,000,000 00 

41.900 00 


1 646,260.150 00 


Lotn of 190&-1018 


63,945.460 00 


LoAii of 1925 


118,489,900 00 


Panama Canal Loan — 

Series 1906 


54,631,980 00 


Series 1908 


30.000,000 00 


Series 1911 


50.000,000 00 


Postal Savings Bonds — 

1911-1913 


41.900 00 


Total 






$1,142,032,090 00 


1 963,359.390 00 



Aggregate of interest-bearing debt. 

Debt past due upon which interest has ceased since maturity. 



DBBT BBABINO NO INTBBBST. 

United States notes 

Old demand notes 

National bank notes — Redemption account 

Fractional Currency 



.1 346,681,016 00 

53,282 50 

26,203.861 60 

6,856,630 90 



Aggregate of debt bearing no interest 

Certificates and notes issued on deposit of coin and silver bullio 



Gold certificates. 

Silver certificates 

Treasury notes of 1890. 

Total debt 



$1,010,966,369 00 

489,166.000 00 

3.093.000 00 



CASH IN THB TBBA8UBY. 

Reserve Fund — 

Gold coin and bullion 

Trust Funds — 

Gold coin and bullion $1,010,966,369 00 

Silver dollars 489,166,000 00 

SUver dolUrs of 1890 3,093,000 00 

Total trust funds 

General Fund — 

Certified checks on banks 609,341 84 

Gold coin 22,017,640 68 

Gold certificates 104,012,002 00 



Silver certificates. 

Silver Dollars 

Silver bullion 

United States notes 

Treasury notes of 1890 

National bank notes 

Subsidiary silver coin 

Fractional currency 

Minor coin ;•.•••• 

Bonds and interest paid awaiting reimbursement , 

Total general funds 

In National bank depositories — 

To credit of Treasurer of United States 

To credit of United States disbursing officers 

Total in National bank depositories 

In Treasury of Philippine Islands — 

To credit of Treasurer of United States 

To credit of United States disbursing officers 

Total in Philippine Islands 

Total cash in Treasury 



11,138,716 00 

1,481,776 00 

1,669,137 70 

8,730.716 00 

14.386 00 

36,366,944 50 

18,016,293 92 

143 83 

1,434,616 06 

10,280 46 



36,151,904 37 
11.616,699 65 



2.075.821 40 
3,777,972 10 



Total debt 2,848,191,389 16 

Total cash in Treasury 1,911,429,661 30 

Total debt, less cash in Treasury 



Total. 



$ 963,359,390 00 
1,821,830 26 



379,794.799 90 



1.503,216,369 00 
$2,848,191,389 16 



$ 160,000,000 00 



1.503,216,360 00 



204.691,894 88 



47,768.603 02 



5,858,793 60 
1,911,429,661 80 



$ 936,761,727 86 



MEMORANDUM. 

Showing the amounts due the United States from Pacific railroads on account of 
bonds issued in aid of their construction. 



Name of road. 


Prinoipal. 


Interest. 


Total. 


Central Branch Union Paciflo 


$1.60a000 00 


$2,043,975 71 


18.643.976 71 







2 

CO 
> 

O 

o 



^ 
g 



8 






1 
I- 






11 






8 

I 



3 

o 

.a 

.1 



S 

p 

•& 



Eh '§ 



•O-J • 



lis 



ooH 



•3^ 

^i 






I 



144 



>C4 














e4< 




g§iiip^^illlliiiSi^S|iiSJi^£.S8ipiJ§Jip|H?giS 
^►.•o*..«3^3ggs-Sg=||s|sSssass8sSsasas5SS62Sfe§g§5855i 







00 COM 

ao5o 



^^ w^^i^C4e««-«c«e«C4e«c<«c«c*e«eQ 




lii§§&g§?g§&ig§s§iiil§ili§§iSiigii§S§§i§§iS§§i 



iS 



VESSEL TONNAGE MOVEMENT IN THE FOREIGN TRADE 
AT THE PRINCIPAL PORTS Of THE WORLD. 

(Compikd ia Iha Bniw nl SUtigtio, Dcpaitment of CoDuant ud Ubot, WMhiivton. D. C.) 



Porta. 


v„. 


Tom.' 


Claared. 
Traa. 


Porta. 


yaa,. 


^^S-- 


'^■ 


EUROPE. 


I>10 

mo 
mo 

IBIO-Il 

leio 

mo 
isw 

s 

mo 

IDOt 

lem 

1W> 

im 

IK»-IO 

1910- 1 


' i 

te 

11,117,773 
1.M8.M7 

S,OM,000 

2.733.1M 
1!,CM.31S 

10,M>,B43 

3;»71.332 

i.«M.ooa 

Ififfl 

'as 

2,U1,033 
2,038.789 

1«.2IB 

^72:883 


8.Wl,7a4 

ii 

3.202[SB7 
4,3S9.301 
6,4i7,»6g 

11,IM3.31I 

lirnw 

I.fi7i,7t8 
3,171.000 
l.l)70.«7 

sas 

7,g77.38E 

1.M1.838 

12.»2S,IM 

10,190,01* 

4,092.118 
3.737,803 

1,871000 

Bffl 

'as 

i;ju;43fl 

ua 

13,3M,a83 


"ffi-ii"'"" 


1010.11 

1110.11 

1009-1(1 

1908 

1909 
19O0-1D 

1909.10 

1910 
1909.10 

S 

1910 
1910 
IBIO 

1910 


830.272 
!,01B,007 

i.ios.seg 

087,371 

l! 809^449 
1,322,800 

i,«73,g4g 

1,2M.848 
S,981.4n 
2.Siaj7« 

3i870,79B 

1,««2,$28 
2,0«0.B3» 

7,107.113 
8.937,381 
3.187,479 

9.198,490 

3,4M.147 

s!«asis37 

4,131,787 

3,319.818 

1,740,148 
8.»4:089 

891.280 


rii 

U3B,0O» 


"SSa"""' 


Js^^::;:: 








1,809.337 

i;7S9:881 

1,768,840 
1,288.031 


ssjr--- 






SSi-""'::: 


"trc'J, 








Bu«™Air.a. 

^^Si. 




8.070,883 
2.810,198 


■Jrs--'- 


CoiMhaiOL 

^"S^ 


RiodaJaiiein)..... 

"•£;™. 




'=i'^"' 








!:S 








BarnBB Coumu^ 
Viclonal 

'c&V-.-;::::: 


BiLaiUM: 


3;2oo;i«8 


EattaduL 




■^hYaVh-MO. 

X°.^:::::::: 






''i-au™. 


l|| 










AFftlCA. 

Eanr: 

CapaTowD* 

PonNataL 

OCEANIA. 




3,344,M0 


m 


iSiS 


BiatonACliulstim 


iSM 








1 FkcarsIortlM 

2 TiSr»>o.«»» 
olaanuxa not tnila 


tMtlvani 


^SlS' 


Mini. 31. 


«a.ll oo»(ii« T<«ri. 


Bapaf. 


« data [on 


^^ 



7 Eieloding wairiupa, Dunorta, yaehla, nabTe oran and atom and aailint Tiaaela niida 
iiK TSaab aotitad in iDlat-MtlkmaDi trada. 

8 EialndiBg tha (OBDua af tanbIb tlut called tvr (ha puryoaa cd ooabnc and for ordoa on 
■ IiuhMbig natin tatt. 

10 TamiataefvJaaitjadaiiddaafadatUitmaritinit esatona- 

tl Ficima of dinMantnaaia and deannoca from audio plana oulaidc tha ConuDoanaltti. 

LONDON AND LIVERPOOL TONNAGE 



80 iDna. but inelnd- 



OTBriUahudtonianvewI. 


untored and oleami lith osraoe 


a in Iha fOTwin 


tT»<to. 




LONPOH. 


L.™.«,.. 




EDMnd. 


QauKl. 


Entarsd. 


ClMr«d. 




0.179.023 
1,221.813 

m 

12,184.182 


a|iai,'s90 

iffiS 

8.184M0 


7317,080 

III 


ffljg 






































e.897.812^ 



WEEKLY EXPORTS OF WHEAT FROM VARIOUS 
COUNTRIES. 

Am r*pitrt«d by Oio. J. S. BsooHiiikLi., lAvotfool, Ensland. 

I\)r the year I9II. 



147 



WEEKLY EXPORTS OF CORN FROM VARI0C8 
COUNTRIES. 

Ai npartBd by Oto. 1. S. Broombalu Livarpool. England. 

For the year 1911. 





Bu. 


*T,"» 


Bo. 


DUDb*. 

Bd. 


BiL 




u 
w 

IB 

» 

1 
16 

1 

! 

2 

J 

! 
1 

i 

i 

3 
5 


870,000 
TKOOO 

S:!!8 
11 

ssoiooo 

!T(l.000 

sx'floa 

M*:000 

'■^■2SS 
s«3,ooa 

tlM,000 

arsiooo 

81,000 
80.000 

asslooo 

,affi 


2,378,000 

■as 

102,000 

'S 


ss 


8(0.000 

ua.ooD 

ffiffi 

ktIooo 

ffiffl 

884,000 
fll 2,000 














































i«.666 










i»:oao 






































it;666 






























































































60,000 
































































































46.050.000 


i,m.<xa 


1S.8»,000 


TO.378,000 









149 



DOMESTIC EXPORTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Thi following table exhibits the value of the exports of domestic products, except gold 
and silver, during the years {ended June SO) 1911, 1910 and 1909, 



Agricultural implements and parta of 

Aluminum and manufactures of 

Animals — ^livin^ 

Art works — paintings and statuary 

Bran and manufactures of 

BreadBtufFs, including bran, middling8« mill feed, etc . . 

CtUBt carriages, other vehicles and parts of — 

Automobiles $15,509,230 

AU other Tehioles 15,026,707 

Cement 

Chemicals, drugs, dyes and medidnes 

Clocks ana watches and parts of 

Coal and coke 

Coffee, green and roasted 

Coppex^-the ore $ 1,095,296 

In pigs, ingots, bars, etc 98,706,308 

Other manufactures of 5.107.802 

Cotton— unmanufactured 685,318,869 

manufactures of 40,851,918 

ESarthen stove and china ware 

Explosives— all kinds 

Fertilisers 

Fibers, vegetables and textile grasses — manufactures of. 

Fish— dried, smoked, cured, canned — includes shellfish. 

Fruits and nuts 

Furs and fur skins 

Glass and glassware 

Glucose and grape sugar — glucose $2,596,220 

grape sugar 799,163 

Grease, grease scraps and ful soap stock 

Hides and skins other than fur skins 

Household and personal effects* 

India rubber, manufactures of 

Instruments and apparatus for scientific purposes 

Iron and steel and manufactures of — 

The ore $ 2,496,291 

Manufactures of 230,725,351 

Leather and manufactures 

Meat and dairy products — ^includes lard and substitutes 

Musical instruments 

Naval stores — includes spirits of turpentine 

Nickel, nickel oxide and matte 

Oil cake and oil cake meal 

Oi]»— Mineral $98,115,516 

Animal 788,880 

Ve^table 19,805;J32 

Paints, pigments and colors 

Paper and manufactures of — includes books and all 
printed matter 

Paraffin and paraffin wax 

Photographic goods 

Seeds 

Soai^ 

Spirits, wines and malt liquors 

Starch 

8 



molasses and confectionery 



Tobacco and manufactures of-~- 

Unmanufaotured $89,255,320 

Manufactures of 4,383,584 

Vegetables 

Wood and manufactures of 

Wool and manufactures of 

All other articles 



Total. 



1911 



$ 35,973,398 

1,330,018 

19,048,653 

680.506 

6,230.092 

124.913,537 



30,584,036 
4,349,290 

23.007.414 
3.126,771 

48,314.400 
5.380,481 



104.908,406 

626,170.787 

8.138.188 

4.763,242 

10,721,132 

8,565.900 

7,698.321 

24.498.465 

10.473.517 

3,246,391 

3,395,383 
5.177.581 
4.802,637 
7.094,366 
12,452,562 
12,421,512 



233,221,642 

53,673.057 

149389.737 

3.471.401 

25.022,720 

6.004.414 

19.631,127 



118,709.608 
6,294,746 

19,215,499 
7,378,736 
7,142,603 
2,475,066 
4.046,981 
3.479.686 
3,137.652 
5.340.730 



43,638.904 
6,545,091 

92,255,951 
2,293.473 

49,762,425 



12.013.549,025 



1910 



$ 28.124.033 

666.937 

17.447.785 

1.065.696 

4.355.561 

133.592,611 



20.680,850 
2,202.376 

21.415,035 
2,588,031 

43,580.018 
5.000.134 



80.300,284 

483.844.340 
2,242,810 
6,852.663 
8,700.640 
6.840,250 
0,652,088 
18,885.654 
14.601.635 
2,805,401 

8.415,220 
4,612,426 
1,738.216 



10.175,634 
10,154,471 



180,770.205 

52,646,755 

130.632.783 

3.182.348 

18.681.062 

4.582,807 

10,251.012 



116,472,514 
5,702,803 

16,083,271 
7,886.350 
4.765.155 
3,485.418 
8.620,546 
3,154,100 
1,274,773 
8,655,614 



43,018,487 
4,207,310 

78,813.803 
2.360,283 

47,066,130 



$1,710,083,008 



1000 



$ 25,004,184 

841,680 

22,645,438 

404,500 

3,510,276 

160,161,624 



15,302317 
1,143,657 

10.131311 
2317,332 

40,060.070 
3,885,616 



86,707,077 

440,260,331 
1,500,634 
3,478,714 
0,283,416 
7384318 
6,113,062 
16368,080 
0307,770 
2,178,103 

2346,080 
4314,001 
1371,100 



7,432,832 
8,027,204 



146,215,405 

42374,705 

166,521,040 

2,610,773 

15,101,147 

8305,174 

25.836.134 



120.687300 
4,780.107 

14,014384 
6,445317 
4,184,716 
5356.623 
3.472,431 
3.006.172 
780.156 
6,183.487 



35.604317 
3.760.466 

67.867.432 
1.971.939 

37.119.717 



$1,638.355398 



*Included in all other articles prior to July 1, 1010. 



Non. — Carried in cars and other land vehicles. 
Carried in American vessel*— steam. . . , 
Carried in American vessels— -sailing.. . , 
Carried in foreign vessels— steam. 
Carried in foreign v( 



.1 125.536,989 

5,920,875 

. 1398.378351 

22.167,691 



$261,644319 

181,467364 

1,620346342 



$2.018349336 



150 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE INTO THE UNITED 

STATES. 



Tke foUoboing table exhVnts the value of imports of merchandise during 1911^ 1910 and 

1909— the years ended June SO. 



Animals, living 

Articles, the itrowth, produce and manufactured of 
the United States, returned 

Art works 

Automobiles and parts of 

Breadstuffs 

Bristles 

Brushes 

Chemicals, drugs and dyes 

Clays or earths 

Clocks and watches and parts of 

Coal and coke 

Cocoa or cacao, crude, and shells of 

Coffee 

Copper, the ore, matte and regains 

Cork wood, or cork bark, and manufactures of 

Cotton — ^unmanufactured $24,776,320 

cloths 8,801,004 

manufactures of 58,195,547 

Diamonds and other precious stones 

Earthen, stone and cfadna ware 

Feathers, etc.. natural and artificial 

Fertilisers 

Fibers, vegetable and textile grasses — 

unmanufactured $80,752,250 

manufactures of 54,705,909 

Fish, fresh and cured 

Fruits and nuts 

Furs — furs and fur skins, undressed $15,351,001 

furs, dressed, and maniifactures of 8,207,047 

Glass and glassware 

Hair — unmanufactured $4,755,131 

manufactures of 642,306 

Hats, bonnets and hoods and materials for same 

Hides and skins, other than fur. 



1911. 



Hops. 

Household and personal effects 

India rubber, gutta-percha and substi- 
tutes for — unmanufactured $02,910,513 

manufactures of 030,408 

Iron and steel— -chromate of iron 437,281 

The ore 6,691,711 

old iron and all manu- 
factures of iron 34,205.968 

Ivory, animal and vegetable 

Jewelry 

Lead, and manufactures of 

Leather and tan skins, and manufactures of 

Marble and stone, and manufactures of 

Matting and mats 

Meats and dairy products 

Metals and metafcompositions and manufactures of. 

Musical instruments, and parts of 

Nickel ore and nickel matte 

Oil cloths and linoleum 

Oils of all kinds 

Paints, ligments and colors 

Paper stock, crude 

Paper, and manufactures of, including books 

Plants, trees, shrubs and vines 

Platinum 

Plumbago 



$ 6,850,964 

20.917,296 

22.495,842 

2,250,750 

13.452,732 

2.970.481 

2.241.066 

95.101,006 

1.946,712 

3,162.961 

5,534.113 

14.552,879 

90,567,788 

39,673.104 

6,609,813 



91.772,871 
40.633,137 
11,411,665 
9,845.344 
10,150.142 



85,518,249 
14.939.314 
41,515,067 

23.618.948 
6,881,891 

5.397,437 
7,518,231 
70.504,980 
2.706,600 
4.975,366 



93,846,921 



41,334,960 
2,115.620 
1.874,309 
4.205,917 

14.636,720 
1,827,423 
1,947,091 

13,890,535 
9,007,015 
1,623,100 
3,946,293 
2,102,612 

83.023,687 
2.045.548 
5,481,680 

18,626,880 
2,729.440 
3.768.203 
1,678,625 



1910. 



$ 7.839,670 

19.211,606 

21.088,720 

3.837.064 

12.861.816 

3.111.872 

1.732.200 

89.119.485 

1.919,668 

2,571.254 

4,982,282 

11,376,061 

69.194.353 

40,210.910 

4.ni.391 



83,868,869 
47,760.265 
11.021 126 
11.992.053 
8,371,883 



00,023.064 
13,835,968 
37,423.827 

26,597.644 
6.553,764 

7,019,010 
7.950.530 
112,247,836 
1,499,354 
5,090,294 



108,096.410 



45,752,674 
2,702,192 
1,576,023 
8,922.334 

16,865,937 
1,926.714 
2,423,301 

11,043.454 

10,099,079 
1.847.862 
3,618.746 
1,834.640 

24.299.589 
1,914.985 
5,206.877 

17,536.755 
2,348,079 
2.809.260 
1,894.206 



1909. 



$ 5,037.671 

12.586.277 

3.797.163 

3.679,134 

14.152,447 

2.583.482 

1.490.321 

79.460.660 

1,715,078 

2,556,631 

4.275.881 

14.850.328 

79,112,129 

38,076.386 

8,042.190 



76.854.770 
29,191.349 

9,800,028 
11,660.064 

5.995.599 



79,060.745 
12.333.506 
81.110.683 

21.086.579 
5.262.190 

8.760.524 
5.403.044 
78,487.824 
1.337,099 
4.542,667 



66.173,989 



25.495.062 

2,686.562 

810.001 

4.670.612 

13,933.134 
1.580.815 
8.290.557 
8,968.806 
0.807.857 
1.243.856 
2,544.222 
1,894.910 

18,287.706 
1.680.034 
3.638.034 

17.259.196 
1.942.906 
1.766.168 
1.463.717 



151 



IMPORTS OP MERCHANDISE— CoNTiNinsD, 



Seeds of all kinds 

BhellSy uniDanuf aetured 

Silk — ^unmanufactured $74,924,004 

manufactures of 31,900,054 

Spices, unground 

Spirits, wines, malt liquors and other beverages 

Sugar and molasses— sugar $96,601,096 

molasses 995.006 

Sulphur ore 

Tanning materials, crude 

Tea 



Tin 

Tobacco— unmanufactured $27,855,996 

manufactures of 5.416,466 

Toys 

Vegetables 

Wood, and manufactures of 

Wool, hair of the camel, goat,alpaca,etc. — 

unmanufactured $23,228,005 

manufactures of 18,569,791 

All other articles 



Totals. 



1911. 



$ 29,759.955 
1,884.714 

106,824,068 

4.946.200 

19,528,323 

97.686.102 

3.108,089 

1.683,514 

17.613.569 

37,935,978 

83,272.462 
7,964.835 
9.293.855 

62,931,803 



41,797,796 
45.564,915 



$1,527,226,105 



1910. 



$ 14.693,776 
1,827,199 

99.751.004 

3.483.459 

24,595.636 

107;716.367 

2,626.705 

1,058,647 

13.671.946 

30.869.532 

88.499.621 
6.585,781 
8,273.371 

54,422,504 



74.753.019 
46.815.797 



$1,556,947,430 



1900. 



$ 5,968,019 
1,889,765 

110,382.565 

5,348,606 

24.508.925 

97.492,789 

2.462.218 

731.795 

18.562.676 

26,007.216 

29.066.099 

4,869.097 

12.999.797 

43.690,427 



63.274.455 
36.308,116 



$1,311,920,224 



NoTS. — Total value of dutiable merchandise 

Total value of merchandise free of duty. 



Total value of imports of merchandise . 

Brought in cars and other land vehicles 

Brought in American vessels — steam 

Brought in American vessels— sailing 

Brought in foreign vessels— steam 

Brought in foreign vessels— sailing 



$750,253,646 
776.972.459 



90.229,004 

141,079.153 

6.407,610 

1,281,374,177 

8,136.161 



$1,527,226,105 



Totals. 



$1,527,226,106 



RECAPITULATION OF EXPORTS AND IMPORTS. 





1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


1908. 


Exports of domestic merchandise r . - . . 


$2,013,549,025 
35,771,174 


$1,710,083,998 
34.900.722 


$1,638,355,593 
24.655,511 


$1,834,786,357 


ETPOts of foreisp merchandise. ...,.,.,... 


25.986.989 






Total ezTK>rts of merchandise , , - , - , r , r 


2.049,320.199 
1,527,226.105 


1.744.984,720 
1,557.819,988 


1.663,011.104 
1.311.920.224 


1.860.773.346 


Imoorts of merchandise. ........ x .-...- 1 ^ - - - . - 


1.194,841.792 






Excess of exports over imports of merchandise . 


522,094.094 


187,164.732 


351,090,880 


666.431,554 


Coin and Bullion Movxmsnt. 
ExDorts of domestic coin and bullion 


81.180,661 
5.290.030 


166,297,832 
6.180.573 


142,997.865 
3.504.718 


122.046.414 


Exnorts of f oreiirn coin and bullion - . ^ - - . ^ 


7.678.579 






Total PTDorta f.n\n itnA htilKnn 


86.470.691 
78.019.947 


172,478.405 
45.912,063 


146.502.583 
47.185.683 


129.724.993 


Tmnortfl of coin and bullion r 


151.263.384 






Excess of imports over exports of coin and 

bullion. . . . - . T . t . . . . . r . . . r . r . X - - r - - 








21.538.891 


Excess of exports over imports of coin and 
bullion- ^ , , , ^ ,-.,,. , , . ^ 


8,450,744 
522,094,094 


126.566,342 
187.164,732 


99.316.900 
351,090.880 




Excess of exports over imports of merchandise. 


666,431.554 


Balance in favor of the Uzuted States 


530,544,838 


313,731,074 


450.407.780 


644,893,163 



EXPORTS OF SPECIFIED DOMESTIC BKEADSTUFFS 
TO EUROPE. 

2he folhrnng staUmeTtt ejhibUs the total exports of fowr. whtM, ewn and rye from 
the United St'itfs to Murope, annually, since IS56 IcalcuUitiong being made for the 
years ended Afig'ist Si to IS69, onU .nnix that dalefor tlie yeurif ended June SO): 









Bu 




Bu. 




Bd. 




Gt.BrltalD 


To 
Europe 


Qt.BrllalD 
Ireland. 


To 
Europe. 


[)t.BrilalD 

and 
Ireland. 


To 
other 

Euroi». 


Gt. Br'n 


eSSS, 




z.m'.m 

!:MI.«14 

1 

ii| 

lll 
iSi 

7,833.071 

«.2«i:7S» 
T,*ai.BSK 

W:S 

10.257.038 

Itl.Mf.flTi 

vsm.isa 

S.flT3.IH3 
2,4.W.M7 

lii 

3,79n.998 


49^343 
118.129 

I00.5U 

7a.flT5 
HS.1173 

■II 
1 

ii 

M£.RMt 

ii 

4l!0.«<l7 

61W.51B 
l.»U.T17 

\S& 

1.308,0(13 

p| 

!.: 63 

'■i 1 

1 i 

1.1 M 


iiiS 

35.7&4.70B 
18.403:^23 

Jiiil 
IP 

10.017,411 

3I,7I»,KTB 

lis 

31,3)Z.»« 
7O.08tt.075 

as 

fls.3afl.Kn3 
44,701. eoa 
5fl.Kano3 

3t.H».2ll 

41. Sa^..^!) 
3S.210,533 

--■-"■■'iflo 

a 

»» 

(6 
04 

1 70 
SE 

1 

30 

i 


£.010,0:11 

KH.iSl 

III 

113.S15 
7M,"417 

2.UBB,;i3B 

10,333.730 
4.1)C.3»« 
7,i54.Mrt 

sii 

5B.li0i,79» 
IS 

ISi 

«:4ii.aai 

lg.334.M3H 
ll.S£i.«G« 

Hi 
ISi 

S4.£3D,H»I 

13.70B.40B 
42.I37.M0 
45.107,1 OS 
i«,170.683 


ujfAm 

14.064.108 
ia3»4.35a 

■.K 

ISf 

u.gis.8ai 

3a.»3fl.771 

IS 

14.»<.4N7 
MisOliwi 

ii 
III 

8i.ais'.727 

33,3M.0«3 
3 1.371 .706 
33.13H.7W 

M.aii»i,a50 

Z8,u:S,034 

lii 


lis 

10.3U 

11.48S 

41.803 

Ii 

1,BG9.497 

SiS 

5,170.841 
0.041.174 

ia:43i:oii 

33.S8i.697 

B,no»,77* 

0,036,000 

iiBiilwe 
i7.Bea,B7i 

10.101.300 
4,873,7^2 

S:S 

0.538.603 

III 

iil 

Kj.aTl.331 

'S:S 

10,471,077 
33.4M.3SS 

lis 

i3.78e!a3z 
22.flei.2ia 


13.^700 
297.789 
1113,589 
63.981 
W.SoS 
81.301 

907 

■|i 

8.330 
207,550 
895.30] 

i.ar.:,280 

1.120.255 
■fl79,R«B 

"ai.sai 
4oe;8« 
■» 

838:4»0 

lesisofl 








s 


13,100 












l,«U,<ei 








B;;;:: ::: 


K! 


























































;S::::.::::: 


SS» 










g:::.:::::: 










078.888 












iffi 








g:::::::::: 


1:^-^ 
















iS-SS 




jffi::::::::: 


'■^■S 







sports to all foreign countries, of Jtour, wheal, < 



Flour, brls... 
Wheat, bu... 

CoTQ. ba 

Oats.bii 

Uye.ba 

B arley, bn... 



4JH.40S 

8e.807.3S 
5.iTf3M 



163 
EXPORTS OF FLOUR, WHEAT AND CORN 

Frorn iKt principal Atlantic (including Citnadian) and Oulf portti wilh their 
principal destinationa, at reported vxeklg dunng the year 1911. 



reported vxekly during the year 1911. 
(Oonplled bf Wm. H. TnttoD.) 



164 
EXPORTS OF FLOUR, GRAIN AND PROVISIONS 

From the principal Atlantic (including Canadian) and Qutf ports, at reported 

vteekly during 191 1- 

(Oomplled bj Wm, H. Trmtum.) 



155 
EXPORTS OF FLOUR 

from tht principal AtUmtie (incEudimj Canadian) and Gulf porta, 
weekly daring 1911. 
(Compiled br Wm. H. Tratton.) 



•Iiudiulfa Norfolk, PmhsoIi, Q^nMoa, HoUls. CluirlHtaa aod Port Ailhur. 



156 
EXPORTS OF WHEAT. 

prom priiunpal Atlantic (inclwUng Cnnadian) and Otdf port*, at nported weMtf 

dvring 1911. 

(OompiteJ bj Wm. H. Tntton.l 



157 
EXPORTS OF CORN. 

From the principal Atlantic (including CaTVidian) and Outf ports, at reporttd 

wetldy dwHTig 1911. 

lOomplled b; Wm. H. Tratton.) 



•Inolude* ChkrlNtoa, PraiMola, UoUls ud Port Aiihur. 



168 
EXPORTS OF HOG PRODUCTS. 

m the principal Atlantic {inebiding Canadian) 
a reported weekly during 1911 
(OompUed by Wm. H. Trafton.) 







Frou N<w Yo«k. 


FllO¥ BonOH, POBTUMD, 
MONTIIAL, St. Johh, 




Pork. 
Brill. 


Baooii 
Lbi. 


K 


ffi; 


kDd bmm). 
Lb,. 


Lard. 




7 
SB 

i 

1 

20 

IT 
8 

I 
1 

30 

1 
1 

IS 


1.DU 

i.ieo 

■« 
1 

1 

i,M» 

1:670 
!.SOT 

E 
S 

ilzis 

2.73! 

J.OTfl 
1,K2 

'i 

3,1M 


100 
100 

100 
■00 

100 


00 

oo 

00 

oo 

00 

i 

8.823,000 

8!lB7!c00 
8,107,000 
4.966,000 

tiflSlloOO 
B,Mtl,000 

6!sS!!oOQ 

Imiooo 

i;43i;ooo 

ii 

7!075!0OO 

6:229:000 

6.073.000 

4,eoa:ooo 
6.M6.000 

3>(ll!000 


'i 
,1 

s 

681 

303 

7M 
1.J79 

,1 

487 
204 

1 
■| 

473 
1,2S3 




6,t3ftJX» 














































April 


7,148,000 








tSKS 

4,265,000 








i 


S?:ffi 
IS 

U3.00D 
2BS,00a 
4M,DO0 

r«:ooQ 

70li0O0 

eaiiooQ 

imIdoo 

i5i!ooo 

issiooo 
)S3,ooo 












































































OstobB. 


i«SK 












4.tIU.D0a 
a.391,000 
















SS2.000 

tu.ooo 
:m,ooo 

imIooo 




Dwrnb^ 


4,907.000 


















1 

s 

E 

in,G03 


1 i 

i i 

i i 

23 00 


i i 

i s 

1 £S 

X no 

32 100 


ai.toe 
lejoo 

s 
i 
li 


17 

i 

1 


00 
00 
00 

s 

00 
00 

00 


2«IS07 00a 



























































IS 

i 

s 
I 

Q 



it 



03 






11 
II 



Pi 
O 

o 

H 

a 



|i 



160 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF LAKE COMMERCE 

ThroiAgh CancUs at SauU Sie, Marie, Michigan and OrUario, 
for the seasons of 1910 and 1911. 



Items. 



Veosels: 

Steamers. . . . 

Sailing , 

Um'egistered. 



Total 

Lookages 

Tomiage: 

Registered 

Freight 

Passengers 

Coal: 

Hard 

Soft 

Flour 

Wheat 

Grain 

Manufactm'ed and pig iron . 

Salt 

Copper 

Iron ore 

Lumber 

Silver ore 

Building stone 

GeneraT merchandise , 



Number. 
Number. 
Number. 



Number. 
Number. 

Net 

Short. . . 
Number. 



Short tons.. 
Short tons.. 

Barrels 

Bushels. . . . 
Bushels. . . . 
Short toes.. 

Barrels 

Short tons.. 
Short tons. . 
M. ft. B.M. 
Short tons. . 
Short tons. . 
Short tons. . 



TuTAIi TBAITIO 



Season 1911 



15.160 
1.681 
1.832 



18.673 
13,292 

41.653.488 

53.477.216 

79.951 

2.060.209 

13.272.667 

7.246.495 

97.141,911 

40.782.609 

412,269 

661.308 

132,481 

30.731.235 

558,513 



5.342 
1,385.918 



Season 1910 



17.674 
1.890 
1,835 



20.890 
14.569 

49.866,123 

62.863,218 

66,933 

1.658,844 

11.854,883 

7.576.789 

86.259.974 

39.245.485 

444.669 

528,610 

148,070 

41.603.634 

603,101 



9.635 
1,411.549 



Chanob 



Amount 



2,514 

209 
497 



2.226 
1.277 

8,202.635 

8.886,002 

13.018 

401,365 

1,417,784 

830.294 

ia881.937 

1,537,124 

32,400 

132.698 

15.589 

10.872.399 

44,588 



4.293 
25.631 



Per cent 



—14 

—11 

37 



—11 

— 9 

—10 

—14 

19 

24 

12 

— 4 

13 
4 

— 7 
25 

—11 
—26 

— 7 



—15 

— 2 



— Decrease. 

Short tons are tons of 2,000 pounds. 

The United States Canal was opened April 24, and closed December 16. 1911; season, 237 dagrf- 

The Canadian Canal was opened April 22, and dosed December 13, 1911; season, 236 days. 



Compiled at St. Mary's Falls Canal, Michigan, under direction of Colonel C. McD. Townsen d 
Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army. 

L. C. Sabin, 

General Saperintendeni. 



162 
STATE VALUATIONS OF PROPERTY FOR TAXATION 





'.{Kil EbUU 


Propeny. 








































ffi::::::::::: ::;:::■::::::::: 
























ss 

i 
i 

IS 
82 

64 

IS 

1 

i 
1 

S2 

i 

ST 
BS 

19 

S 








1 M 

1 
1 

M 

i 
i 

i 

i 

IS 

i 
i 

il3 

i 
i 

31 

i 

to 

1 

gas 

SSffi 

4ST,MT,I04 
















S:::::::::.:; :;::::;:::::::::: 
















































MM 
















































!!!::::::::;::;;:::::.;;::::::;:.: 












^ 












1B88 

ffi!:;::::::;::;;:;;.:.:::::::::::: 




























ilSS:::::.:-:::--::::::::::; 

























































the Gtate oSoera, Hnd from IBSS cc 



NOTB.— Dp W 

._e state ofBoore. . , .„ ._ . _. 

benoethe details or real estate &nd perEonBl property valuattoDS ore not comclote lur Ibote 
years. Id INBT and 1M8 tbe details of valuallOD are not eotirely correct, owing to cbaniies bytbe 
oporatlOD of ibe equalization law, BInce 1868 the yaluatlons are bb eqaallied. Tbe toUI valnk- 
tfoua in eucb ol tbe e«veral years are correct and ofiioial. 

Tbe THluallons for 13T3aa equalized are largely Id ezcesB of any prevloaB year. In 1ST4 
BomecliaDses were made in tbe manner or equallztos tbe oSBessments, resulting in reducing all 
tbe TaluatlouB, especiallr tbose of railroad properly 

Tbe valUBtlons for 1899 to 1908 Inclutilre are tbe one-flftb of tbe full fair casb valuatloni 
of property as determined by tbe Assesnlnti offlcem, undertbe require men In of tbe AaBesament 
Act of less. The vBluallon for 1909 and subsequent years is tbe oue-tblrd of tbe full fair cash 
valuatlonB of prDperty as determined by the ApseiBlQg officers, under the requirements ot tbe 

The Sta1« debt, as DOUd, represents it as it stood on the Ist ot January in each of the 
..™™i .. i.un..- •.<«> — d 1870, as it stooif " '— '■ '- '"" ~ "■ --—-■»' • — — - 






w ISIS, as It stood December I. 



1871, aa it stood I>eoemb«r U: 



163 



2 



555 



<ees< 



;§i§§il§3|g§§§§§§§! 



ig'S'SSC3f!^3Ctfl^44:^^^'&'&&'^^^^!^^Srtf2f!f^ 





la 
Oh 



(4 2. 






CO 43 



S2 



o 

CO 

d 
o 

a 
o 







I : 



s 

lo^ i«ic>.t. «0 40toieietAaoeoioteu»tA -■^^-^'^eomcQeoeecoee 

__^ . ^ ^1 









lO'^ 




O M CO H ^ 9» QD ^14 ^^ 
t; ^ «D M 00 vH ^ ^ 






Siiii'^ 



s ^ 






r*^ »• 



WaStO 



mi 



«P -^ €» rr Ok CO M tr S2 CO A 

» V * •» •* •■ • 












§1 



■<«■ 00 9 lA W « <^) So M OD «0 S '« » >i to OS SS o 91 o t>- SS 



oof 












a 

^I'SaS 

g « o ©"^ 



tSSSSScSoow 



Ok A QbOs 65 < 
oooQaoaoaot 



-t-t 






O 

3 

»^ 

o 



«i 



'3 

I 
I 



I 



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► 

I 



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s 

o 

o 
g 

3 

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e 

OS 



§ 



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3 



164 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD. 

Ihe following official table shows the amount of gross receipts of the lUinois CentraX 
EaUroad since its completion to October SI, 1911, and ihe amcwvt of tax paid 
into the State Treasury in accordance with the provisions of its charter: 



From Maroh 24, 1866, to October 81. 1855. 

For the year ended October 31, 1866 

1857 



1858. 

1859. 

1860. 

1861. 

1862. 

1803. 

1864. 

1865. 

1866. 

1867. 

1868. 

1869. 

1870. 

1871. 

1872. 

1878. 

1874. 

1875, 

1876. 

1877 , 

1878., 

1879. 

1880. 

1881. 

18Ai. 

l»tci. . 

18S4. 

1885. 

1886. 

18S7 

1K88. 

1889. 

1890. 

1891. 

1892. 

189B. 

1894. 

1895. 

1896. 

1897. 

1898. 

1899. 

1900. 

1901. 

1902. 

1903. 

1904. 

1905. 

1906. 

1907. 

1908. 

1909. 



OroBS 
receipts. 



I n95,633 86 
1.562,683 82 
2,160,372 69 

1.855.793 34 

1.887.206 77 
2.536,531 67 
2,532,264 47 

8.081.065 79 
4,291,851 00 
5.793,067 71 
7.092,711 04 
6,101,062 18 
6,342.967 66 
6.119,964 06 
6,641,904 47 
6,636,921 66 
6.621,613 05 
6,326,522 11 
6,122,485 76 
5.633,806 56 

5.368.066 02 

5.065.794 14 
4,519,813 42 
4,577,505 80 
4,649,676 96 
5,262,123 73 
6.494,085 96 
5.657,658 77 
5.553,474 18 
5,095.423 28 
5.254,127 50 

5.410.207 16 
5,919.636 72 
6,070,796 53 
6,574,923 58 
6,946,878 25 
7,685,796 37 
8,421,228 80 

10,758,103 43 

7,913.021 23 

8.804,593 01 

8,926.519 84 

8.921,896 40 

9,386,183 02 

9.943.533 66 

11.201.328 87 

12.050.049 58 

13,4.58,017 14 

15.411.298 15 

15,179.606 00 

15.503,331 09 

17.034.643 00 

17,603.373 06 

15,615.949 17 

16.466,704 96 

17.398.960 16 

17.706.017 70 



Percent 
of tax. 



5)6 

6" 

5 and 7 

756 
7- 
7* 
7* 
7* 
7- 
7" 
7- 
7" 
7" 
7" 
7" 
7" 
7* 
7* 
7- 
7- 
7" 
7- 
7- 
7- 
7- 
7- 
7* 
7" 
7" 
7- 
7- 
7- 
7- 
7 - 
7- 
7* 
7" 
7- 
7- 
7- 
7- 
7- 
7* 
7- 
7- 
7* 
7* 
7- 
7 - 
7- 
7* 
7* 
7- 
7- 
7" 
7- 



Amount paid 

Into the 
State Treasarj 



Total paid to the State. 



I 20,751 59 
77,63166 
146,645 84 
132,005 53 
132.104 46 
177,557 22 
177,257 81 
212,174 60 
800,304 66 
406,514 04 
406,480 84 
427,075 75 
444.007 74 
428,307 48 
464.988 81 
464,584 52 
468,512 01 
442,656 54 
428,574 00 
894>366 46 
875,766 02 
356,005 58 
316,351 04 
820,431 71 
825,477 88 
368,348 66 
884,5a3 58 
306,036 11 
888,743 10 
856,670 62 
867,7¥>8 02 
378,714 50 
414,374 57 
424,056 80 
460,244 65 
486,281 13 
.'>38,005 67 
580,486 02 
753,067 24 
553,011 40 
616.321 50 
6'M,8.56 30 
624,532 74 
657.032 81 
606.047 35 
784.003 01 
844,133 47 
942,061 10 
1,078,700 52 
1.062.571 86 
1,085,233 17 
1,192,425 01 
1.238.536 12 
1,003.116 44 
1.162,669 34 
1,217.927 84 
1.230.484 24 



|:)0.940,021 60 



166 



STATEMENT OF RAILWAY LINES COMMUNICATING 

DIRECTLY WITH CHICAGO. 



BOAD6. 



Atchison, Topeka & Santa Pe (Santa Fe Route) 

Baltimore & Ohio. 

Ohloago, Burlington ft Qulncy (Burlington Boute). . 

Ohicago, Oindnnati ft Louisville 

Chicago Great Western 

Chicago, Indianapolis ft Louisville (Monon Boute). . 

Chicago, Illinois ft Indiana .... 

Chicago, Indiana ft Southern 

Chicago Junction 

Chicago, Lake Shore ft Eastern 

Chicago, Milwaukee ft St. Paul 

Chicago, Bock Island ft Pacific (Book Island Boute). 

Chicago Short Line 

Chicago ft Alton 

Chicago ft Calumet Blver 

Chicago ft Eastern Illinois 

Chicago ft Illinois Western 

Chicago ft North-Western (Northwestern Line) 

Chioago ft Western Indiana 

Chicago Union Transfer 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago ft St. Louis (Big 4) . . 
Erie. 



Frisco Lines 

Grand Trunk Western (Grand Trunk System). 

Illinois Central 

Indiana Harhor Belt 

I/ake Shore ft Michigan Southern 

Michigan Central 

Minneapolis/St. Paul ft Sault Ste. Marie 

New York, Chicago ft St. Louis (Nickel Plate) 

Pennsylvania System 

Pere Marquette 

Wabash 



Total. 



xniBAaB 



10,099 

4,618 

9,040 

885 

1,487 

616 

8 

389 

803 

248 

9,056 

8,004 

SO 

006 

18 

966 

17 

9,690 

60 

100 

2,687 

8,611 

4,738 

4.757 

4,709 

106 

1,663 

1,808 

8,765 

583 

11,236 

8,388 

8,515 

100,140 



166 



NUMBER OF MILES OF RAILROADS IN OPERATION 

And the mtZes oonstrw^ted each year in the TJ. 8. since 18S0» 



Tear. 



1830 

1881 

188S 

1883 

1834 

1835 

1838 

1837 

1838 

1839 

1840 

1841 

1843 

1848 

\844 

1846 

1846 

1847 

1848 

1849 

1850 

1851 

1858 

10dO« • • • s • 

1864 

1856 

1856 



MUesin 
operation 
at end of 
each year. 



83 

96 

889 

380 



1.096 
1.873 
1,497 
1,913 
8,308 
8,818 
3,585 
4,088 
4.185 
4,377 
4,633 
4,030 

v,9iRi 

5,996 
7,365 
9,081 
10.988 
12,906 
15,360 
16,780 
18,374 
88,016 



MUes 
con- 
structed 
each year. 



78 
134 
151 
853 
465 
175 

416 

389 

516 

717 

491 

159 

198 

856 

897 

668 

398 

1,369 

1,656 

1,961 

1,986 

8,458 

1.360 

1,654 

3.648 



Year. 



1867.. 
1858.. 
1850.. 
I860.. 
1861.. 
1868.. 
1863.. 
1864.. 
1865.. 
1866.. 
1867.. 
1868.. 
1869.. 
1870 . 
1871.. 
1878.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1878.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1880.. 
1881.. 
1888.. 
1883.. 



MUes In 

operation 

at end of 

each year. 



84,508 
86,968 
88,789 
30,686 
31,886 
32,180 
33,170 
33,908 
35,086 
36,801 
39,250 
42,889 
46,844 
52,988 
60.293 
66,171 
70,868 
78,385 
74.096 
76,806 
79,088 
81,747 
86,666 
934958 
108,108 
114,677 
121,428 



MUes 
con- 
structed 
each year. 



8,487 
8,465 
1,881 
1,837 
660 
884 
1,060 
788 
1.177 
1,716 
8,848 
8,979 
4,616 
6,078 
7,879 
6,878 
4,007 
2,117 
1,711 
8,712 
8,874 
8,665 
4,800 
6,706 
9,846 
11,668 
6,746 



Year. 



884 

886 

oBD ... 

887 



889 

1890 

801 

898 

1888 

894 

806 

896 

807 

898 

899 

900 

902 

903 

904 

906 

906 

907 

908 

909 

910 



Miles in 
operation 
at end of 
each year. 



186345 
128,880 
180338 
148314 
166,114 
161376 
166,703 
170.789 
175.170 
177,616 
179.415 
181,116 
188,769 
184.591 
186.810 
190,818 
194.882 
196,743 
808,988 
807.336 
218,394 
817,341 
882,766 
828,188 
:a3,046 
838,856 
848,107 



Miles 
con- 
structed 
each year 



8,988 
8.975 
8.018 
18,876 
6,900 
6468 
5,487 
4.086 
4,441 
8346 
1,899 
1,700 
1,664 
1388 
8,819 
4.006 
3,444 
4.481 
4.186 
4.897 
6,069 
4,947 
6,486 
6.368 
8318 
6.310 
8,751 



167 



MILES 



In Ihe United States at varioua periods since 1860. 

(Obtained from Poor's Manual.) 



Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts. . 
Bhode Island.... 
Connecticut 



New England 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylrania 

Delaware 

Maryland ( 

District of Oolumhia. . \ 

Middle Atlantic. 



Ohio 

Michigan 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisconsin 

Central Northern . . . . 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina. 

Georgia 

Florida 

South Atlantic 



Alabama 

Ifississippl 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Oulf & Miss. Valley. . 

Missouri 

Arkansas 

Texas. 

Kansas. 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Indian Territory \ 

Oklahoma Territory... | 

Southwestern 

Iowa 

Minnesota 

Nebraska 

North Dakota ) 

South Dakota ) 

"Wyoming 

Montana. 

Northwestern 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

Nerada 

Idaho' 

Arizona 

Utah 

Pacific 



Bboafitttlation— 
New England Group... 

Middle Group 

Central Nortnem Gr*p 
South Atlantic Group. 
Gulf & Miss. Val. GrHp. 
Southwestern Group. . . 
Northwestern Group.. 
Pacific Group 

United States 



1860. 



245 
467 
S90 
1,085 
08 
408 



2.607 

1,861 

206 

1.240 

80 

260 



3,106 

976 
842 
228 
lU 
20 



1,270 
384 

or 

288 

289 

048 

21 



1.717 

188 
75 



78 
80 



416 



2,607 
8,106 
1,276 
1,717 
416 



9.021 



1860. 



472 
661 
664 
1,264 
108 
001 



3,660 

2,682 
660 

2,598 
127 

386 



6.858 

2,946 

779 

2,168 

2,790 

906 



9,588 

1,879 
852 
837 
973 

1,420 
402 



6,463 

743 
862 
1,258 
634 
385 



3,727 

817 

38 

807 



1,162 
665 



655 



23 



28 

3,660 

6,863 

9,688 

5,468 

: 8,727 

1.162 

656 

23 



80,626 



1870. 



786 
786 
614 
1,480 
136 
742 



4,494 

8,928 

1,126 

4,666 

197 

671 



10,6n 

8,688 
1,688 
3,177 
4,823 
],525 



14,701 

1,486 
887 
1.178 
1,139 
1,845 
446 



6,481 

1,157 

990 

1.492 

1,017 

450 



5406 

2,000 
266 
711 

1,501 
167 



4,625 

2,683 

1,092 

706 

66 

459 



5,004 

"iso 

925 
503 



257 



1,934 

4.494 
10.577 
14,701 
6.481 
5,106 
4.626 
5.004 
1.934 



52.922 



1880. 



1,005 

1,015 

914 

1,915 

210 

923 



5,982 

5,967 

1,684 

6.191 

275 

1,040 



15.147 

5,792 
3.988 
4,373 
7,851 
8.155 



25,109 

1,808 
691 
1,486 
1,427 
2,459 
518 



8.474 

1.843 
1,127 
1,843 
1,530 
662 



6,995 

3,965 
850 
8,244 
3.400 
1,570 
758 

289 



14,085 

5,400 
8,151 
1.053 

1,225 

512 
106 



12,847 

289 
506 
2.195 
739 
206 
349 
842 



5,128 

5,982 
15,147 
25,109 

8.474 

6,995 
14.065 
12.847 

5.128 



93.267 



1890. 



1,877.47 
1.142.26 

991.42 
2.006.68 

217.43 
1,006.64 



6,881.90 

7.684.41 
2.109.06 
8,688.99 
814.96 
1.270.04 
20.66 



20.088.11 

7.980.49 
7.106.48 
6.100^9 
10,166.67 
5.612.62 



86.976.45 

8.360.65 
1,438.80 
8.128.17 
2,289.15 
4,600.80 
2,480.52 



17,800.60 

8,422.20 
2.470.85 
2,767.38 
2.942.88 
1,789.86 



18,342.66 

6.142.02 
2.203.44 
8,709.86 
8.802. U 
4,291.11 
1,888.77 

1J900.65 



{ 



82,887.95 

8,416.18 
6,645.86 
5.407.47 
2,116.49 
2.610.41 
1.002.98 
2.195.57 



27.294.36 

2,012.06 
1,439.97 
4,849.73 
928. 18 
946.11 
1,094.81 
1.265.49 



12,031.34 

6.881.90 
20,068.11 
36,976.45 
17300.59 
18.842.66 
82,887.95 
27,294.86 
12,081.34 



166.703.36 



1900. 



1.916.94 
1.193.15 
1.046.28 
2.111.42 
209.29 
1.026.40 



7,601.48 

8.096.00 

2,242.93 

10.334.06 

848.62 

1.389.84 

24.88 



22.884.86 

8,886.46 
8.092.46 
e.ff78.19 
11,048.40 
6.588.87 



41,188.88 

8,789.68 
2,473.34 
8,737.68 
2,919.81 
5,729.91 
8,265.71 



21.905.38 

4,197.22 
2,934.27 
8,184.91 
8,098.75 
2,801.27 



16,211.42 

6.887.44 
3.108.66 
9.991.62 
8.714.06 
4,649.68 
1,770.77 
( 1.487.60 
! 919.87 



37.529.60 

9370.85 
6,996.89 
5,695.26 
2,810.62 
2.961.86 
1.241.88 
3,029.22 



32,105.68 

2.888.44 
1,670.90 
5,588.66 
920.37 
1,319.41 
1,515.94 
1,581.92 



15,485.54 

7.501.48 
22.384.85 
41,138.38 
21,905.88 
16,211.42 
87,629.60 
32.105.58 
15.485.54 



194,262.23 



1906. 



8,091.12 
U91.77 
1,063.80 
2,104.87 
209.84 
1.020.12 



7,680.92 

8.218.12 

8,869.61 

11,161.45 

838.60 

1.406.81 

84.70 



83.408.29 

9348.26 
8,521.46 
7,046.90 
11,969.09 
7.188.18 



43,968.89 

8.862.11 
8.966.05 
4.015.58 
3.184.19 
6.516.61 
3,635.38 



84.179.92 

4,758.67 
3,541.04 
3.606.88 
8,856.07 
8.764.17 



19,086.73 

7,860.57 
4,165.72 
11,949.02 
8,874.58 
5.083.20 
8.506.64 
2.686.47 
8,886.19 



46,061.89 

9,858.10 
7,947.10 
5,831.85 
3.784.69 
8,188.04 
1.280.63 
3,328.48 



35,157.88 

3.801.05 
1,881.67 
6,271.60 
1,282.22 
1,493.20 
1,830.97 
1,807.84 



17,868.55 



7,680. 
28,406. 
48,968. 
24,179 
19.025. 
46,061. 
35.U7. 
17,868 



217,341 



92 
29 
89 
92 
73 
89 
83 
56 

OS 



1910. 



2,319.51 
1351.28 
1,094.89 
1.188.19 
811.87 
1,016.96 



7,016.78 

8,518.80 

8,809.71 

11.687.86 

888.17 

1,488.01 

28.22 



24.207.86 

9,396.10 
9,075.12 
7,462.92 
18,110.73 
7,658.78 



45.706.59 

4,377.19 
3,568.09 
4360.11 
3.440.19 
7,860.10 
4,360.99 



27,940.07 

5,256.17 
4,371.19 
3,875.10 
3«688.75 
5,g79.11 



22,770.88 

8,191.17 
5,150.U 
14,629.78 
9.068.17 
5,669.26 
3,067.06 

|6»088.79 



51,772.84 

9.952.88 
8,764.10 
6,173.19 
4,487.29 
4,149.06 
1,662.17 
4348.78 



39,437.36 

4,767.83 
2,878.11 
7,372.87 
2,178.U 
8.397.64 
8,167.99 
1.993.73 



23.256.28 

7,016.72 
24.207.86 
45,705.50 
27,940.67 
22,770.88 
51.772.84 
39,437.86 
88.866.28 



242,107.14 



168 



EXPORTS OF FLOUR, WHEAT AND CORN FROM 

THE UNITED STATES, 

During the year ended December SI, 1911, and the principal countries to which 

the same were exported. 



United Eingdom. 

Germany 

Belffiiim 

NetnerlandB 

France 

Italy. 



Ruena in Europe. 

Denmarlc 

Other Europe.. .. 

Canada 

Mezioo 

South America. . . 
Cuba. 



Central American Statee and British Honduras. 

Other Weet Indies and Bermuda 

Chinese {Empire 

Honckonc 

Jai^an. 

Philippine Islands 

Africa 

Other Countries 



Flour. 
Brls. 



2.828.761 
200.071 



874,007 

*"m6* 



870,648 
81,205 



1.1&6,776 
840,232 
500,168 
086,427 
548,088 

1,876.141 
660.117 
243,018 



Wheat. 
Bu. 



16,081,174 

1,7214)66 

4,050,551 

8,480,254 

086.870 

548.267 



1,870.676 
771,842 
466.038 
500,004 



Com. 
Bu. 



10,700,710 
8,684,271 
2,400,004 
7,688,506 



2,978,188 



12,574,507 
8,061,906 



2481.0«8 



Totals, 1011. 

" 1910. 

' 1909. 

' 1906. 

• 1907. 

' 1906. 

■ 1906, 



235,742 



1,887,300 



11,258.030 
8.370.201 
0.687.993 
13.013.025 
15.276.506 
14.324.100 
11,344.432 



82.668.615 
24,257.802 
48.480,674 
02,779.509 
01.388,648 
62.850.084 
20.738,635 



2,400.600 



61.572,068 
42,602.961 
36,206,660 
87,577.717 
88i200.872 
IQS.518,817 
11U66.931 



Q 

i 

CM 



170 



RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN 



At New OrUanSt monthly^ for 1911. 



Janoary 

Febraary 

March 

April 

May 

Jane 

Jaly 

Aagast 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 

Total 1910 
Total 1909 
Total 1906 



♦ Flour. 


Wheat. 


Oorn. 


Oats. 


Brl8. 


Ba. 


Bo. 


Ba. 


146^7 


8,000 


1.898.000 


230.000 


103.070 


6.000 


1,782,000 


110,000 


110.644 


7.000 


609.000 


139.000 


113.265 


26,000 


356.100 


124.000 


135.783 


65.000 


443333 


179.000 


121.739 


23.000 


335,000 


186.756 


104.287 


189.000 


177.020 


207.240 


101.106 


183.000 


173.000 


128.000 


166,410 


95.000 


124,500 


122.600 


108.096 


4.000 


206,000 


166,000 


87.209 


20,000 


184.600 


167,000 


87.886 


16.000 


876,000 


180.000 


1.385.352 


636.000 


lA^^ 


1.884.505 


934,543 


176.000 


9.947.000 


1,885,000 


1.061.117 


1.606.000 


8.8n,000 


1,699,000 


1.123.297 


3,070.500 


5,876.000 


8,735,765 



^Through consignments of flour not Included In receipts. 



EXPORTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN 



From New Orleans^ morUfUy^ for 1911. 



January 

Febraary , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. 

September 

October , 

November. ... 
December 

Total 

Total 1910 
Total 1909 
Total 1908 



Flour. 


Wheat. 


Com. 


Oats. 


Brls. 


Bu. 


Bu. 


Ba. 


73,429 




1,147,528 


11.662 


55,665 


1.965 


1,366,648 


5,998 


58.638 


3.661 


1.040,652 


15,084 


73,187 


24.535 


557,212 


5314 


69,109 


24.674 


220,612 


25,984 


61.639 


16.000 


882,622 


18.892 


51,287 


60.590 


74344 


8,529 


69.659 


280,000 


104.809 


18.433 


86.410 


32,013 


220367 


1313 


67,200 


123,169 


144.114 


1359 


62,186 


2,011 


84303 


2.568 


40.991 


83.799 


491,072 


10.773 


769.890 


602,417 


5,793,673 


121.804 


708.018 


213,654 


7305301 


67321 


625.637 


1,810.888 


6.192.641 


172377 


860,087 


3,508.309 


4,606.796 


124.780 



171 



RECEIPTS OF FLOUR, GRAIN, ETC. 

At New TorJCf monthly ^ for 1911. 



(Famished by the N. Y. Prodace Exchange.) 



Flour. 
Bife. 



Januftry. . . 
February- . , 

March 

April 

May 

June , 

July 

AUffUBt. . . . , 

September. 
October . . . , 
November. , 
December. , 

Totals. 1911 
1910 
1909 
1908 
1907 



657,837 
641,179 
696.682 
580,600 
743,001 
684334 
604,114 
690,020 
704,508 
772,634 
743,910 
785.012 



Wheat. 
Bu. 



8,304.331 
8.098,007 
7,069,142 
7393.843 
6.509.359 



730300 
764,400 
1,113.600 
709300 
2.470,800 
1,195,000 
2319,400 
4361,500 
2342300 
4314,100 
4386,200 
2,899300 



Oom. 
Bu. 



28,406,400 
16.413,300 
23,304,300 
27,797,800 
33,573,621 



3301325 

2,156,625 

1317375 

782375 

1376,725 

1,165,195 

870,100 

490.688 

1,674,800 

385,900 

363.725 

1.976,625 



Oata. 
Bu. 



16,061358 

12,285,500 

7,428,005 

8,057,305 

22386,425 



2345335 
1,753,750 
1.235.250 
1.628,700 
2311350 
2398.400 
2364.925 
3.279.175 
1334325 
2.608300 
1.934.525 
1.456375 



Rye. 
Bu. 



24,650310 
23,115325 
22,717.562 
23,853.600 
26.754300 



13,800 

2,300 

17350 

24,182 

20,550 

62325 

3.420 

2300 

57.500 

56.120 

22,170 

19.550 



301,997 
287.788 
300,100 
876,850 
1.493375 



Bariey. 
Bu. 



449312 
352,936 
878338 
867,470 
344.276 
185,760 
8,925 
71.435 

375311 
426.905 
548391 
379.958 



3.888.717 
2,047,743 
8.409.825 
4.157.765 
3.027.382 



Also in 1911<-Malt. 5.338300 bushels; buckwheat. 152.400 bushels. 



Peas. 
Bu. 



17.300 

14,850 

16300 

6,600 

7,000 

8,500 

57323 

67.003 

54.596 

24.792 

10.835 

10.534 



296.153 
258.775 
275.095 
277.540 
172.058 



CMeaL 
Bife. 



EXPORTS OF FLOUR, GRAIN, ETC. 

Prom New York, monthly, for 1911, 



67.387 
54,996 
69.742 
74,836 
70367 
82.489 
79.975 
54.659 
57.708 
39.899 
27.497 
57311 



726,765 
682326 
494372 
489386 
454337 





Flour. 
Bris. 


Wheat. 
Bu. 


Com. 
Bu. 


Oats. 
Bu. 


¥^- 


Barley. 
Bu. 


Peas. 
Bu. 


C. Meal. 
Bris. 


January 


244.461 
216.911 
387320 
243.961 
351,182 
327.638 
235,304 
321.478 
266,879 
319,149 
287,089 
306,056 


848.741 
1,035.581 
1.111.188 

877,702 
2351,074 

652.628 
1.299,564 
3.067.164 
1.603,068 
2317.735 
3.834315 
1.772,605 


2319387 

2.045,917 

1,710391 

616,788 

1,116.821 

840,585 

507,600 

387,709 

1,078,022 

891,453 

80,097 

791,109 


13,635 
10,868 
44,740 
14,780 
84,681 
20,723 
64.607 
48,882 

35311 
42310 
53,081 
50.225 






11321 

4.996 

12.484 

3,903 

3.169 

5,840 

2,664 

7.176 

3.162 

15315 

28.399 

14,834 


13.395 
8.300 


February 






March 






19.644 


April 






9.182 


May 






15,859 
17,384 
14,080 
13,655 
10,987 


June 






July 






August 






September 






October 






11306 


November 






15.137 


DeAember . . , ... 






24.354 








Totals, 1911 


3,507,628 
2,989.962 
2.956.801 
3319,968 
3.002,455 


20,571,965 
9,278370 
17,589,885 
27,035,674 
27.111,717 


12,085,979 
7,512.263 
3.677.253 
4313.194 

20359.668 


433,893 
612,796 
477,134 
619,609 
2,355,904 






112.663 
118,160 
104.593 
161.766 
137.588 


178.183 


1910 

1900 

1906 

1907 


52.832 

216.470 

1,206,325 

1334.308 


4413O8 
934.080 
667.487 
264,837 


188,612 
137.144 
167.768 
216,122 



Exports of buokwheat during 1911. 153.042 bushels. 



172 



i 

8 

I 

CO 

B 






i 



S 

a 



8 = 

8»»—— S: 



! 



flPQQQQQOflOQO 



OQ 

o 
PS 



<1 



I 



I 



1 






I 









*pov»b in*! OK 






5 



I 






7 7 .4 i 

M n c*M *4 *4^ c« M eo M oe 



V4 V4 «0 a <DO 



RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN. 

At the principal western river and lake ports for the last Hvt yean. 





'is 


Wbeat. 
Bii. 


r^°- 


°B%"- 


K 


■r?' 


Total. 
boBhels. 


IWT. 


I),t35.311 


1,043,»M 

11 

4;8,S9.500 

ss.a 18,270 

8.961,000 
3B,S17,700 


Li 


i»,i9&.wa 

l£,B91.aXI 
8,S33,ff77 


gsss 

tloilsoo 

506,891 
351,341 
1H3,TOO 
1,940.340 
140,000 
181,700 


2.964.158 
3,697.400 
18,818,258 
161835:362 

■477:849 


89311.156 

III 

43,507.800 
S3,7B7,3S0 






^S^::e 




Omaba 

Raima* CltT 




lS.936.0*e 


250,334.174 


23JJffiJBl 


203,064.622 


7.968.128 


7i.m.ui 


880,098.015 




uoe. 


Si 

Irinnpiltd 
242. 1H» 


", 1 

1 i 

14 00 

« «0 


1 S 

a 00 
5 oo 

S 00 


2)1 OS 

i i 

J s 


11329.000 

2Be,s«c 


as 

23.698.615 

"•■is 
"■is 

544,600 












Milwaukee. 


50.349,087 


MlQneapoilB..,!"! 


13,931,400 




56,87SiS6 


Tot*l» 


a).IU8.IM 


2as^iB.osa 


Itra.7i8.i37 


ll.J(»,»l 


7,533.568 


T4.I4&B91 


798.945,785 


im. 


4,»n.oso 

3,8«5,fi0 

:^ 

"SSI 


a IS 

i i 
1 i 

2_ .32 


9C ZO 

j 1 

2S DO 


1 1 


1,420.350 
2.238,5110 

1,048,700 
123:100 
198 000 
3I4,8in 


37.081,814 
20.235,500 

■as 

13,869,800 
4E1,300 

2.663:440 

5fis.a3a 




Sr^^:^^: 


123, 398.209 
85,888,071 




54.638.560 






















S48.18B.S99 


181,534,347 


16&.339.06I 


6,598.680 


77,644.920 








affiS^ii-:::;, 


••ffiS 

S,14».SSG 

»7.ia7 


43!&3^ 

i:ai8 


iOO 
181 

itn 

599 


so 


10 00 

■: s 

2 SO 

'; SS 

00 

;i,9ffr,i60 


i: S 
S 

00 
96 
60 


28.685,000 
21.972,420 
10,764,MB 
2.475,166 

"■as 

663,21)0 
2.885.180 


294,858.724 






KansaeClcj 


63.502:441 
87:815.675 












li.09I.su 


iab',ii5g 








Totals. 


a,ixi0.m 


2U.ISe,937 


206,881,218 


i9e.U6.iii 


5.600.673 


79.684,108 


844.6^,471 


IMl. 


Si 


37 DO 

f, 1 


■ i 

1 00 
M 


1 i 

t «a 

J 13 


as 

704,848 
E37.31S 

'''^'?Jo" 
9T;eoo 

37B,OO0 
3S4;4a2 


li 1 




».1,S-:;;::.; 


141,900.814 
87,418,623 
7.■i65^985 
Bfl:Mi:713 
60,049.700 
40:281,600 










DetTOli 




12,203,311 


Totals. 


18.gni.DK> 


343,fia7.888 


Ell.ll37,4ei 


172.009,909 


7.fl06,ei3 


75,182.708 


786,8n.7B6 



CHOPS OF THE 



Acreage, prodwAvm and lumte value of tfit 
(As estlmftteil brtbe tTnltad 





Ck>SH. 


W«T.-W^X. 




Acmve. 


Yield 
par 


Produd- 


Toul 

v^ue. 


AcMce. 


per 


Produo. 


ToWJ 




^'iTooo 


Biuh 

4i:o 

48:s 

sl 

M.O 
25.7 
18.4 

i:! 

M.a 
alio 

M.O 

ii 

28:8 

i«!o 

]| 

U.O 

ii 

80.0 

i:: 


Bushela. 


Dolism 

•■""TO 

10 

10 
10 

! 

« 

n 

10 


I 
I 


Ai-n*. 


Biuli 


Bkubal*. 


Dollan. 




1 

1,080 


000 

E 

ODO 

Z 

000 

i 


IS 


uoo 

E 

000 

ooo 
»o 


















































NBwYork 

N«wJ«r«y 


us.ooo 

84 000 
1,M»,000 

oosiooo 
lulooo 


S.S 

!:! 

s:o 

12:0 


«.728,D00 
1:401:000 

13«7:000 
9,378,000 
9:000:000 

9:t38:000 

Mtsm 

1,740.000 


Ii 




: 


8 


South Caralina..'!! 


! 




CO 

00 

00 
00 
CO 
00 

00 
00 
CO 
00 
00 

00 
00 

00 
00 

00 

i 






ijss.ooo 

2,337,000 

alaislooo 

' MioOO 

■■■287,666 

2^00,000 


18.0 

io:? 


atj40.ooo 

H,3M,00a 
4Jfl00.000 

U76:000 
36.110,000 


KB 

37.380,000 
16.230.000 
i;418,000 


Jlli^:::::::::: 
























4|72[.0OO 
780,000 
720.000 

»;ooo 


ill 


ii:o3o:ooa 
s,iwe,ooo 

ios:ooo 


83.471,000 




KSS:::::::: 

Alsbuns 


0,114.000 
7,»4»,000 
414.000 
108.000 




700,000 
1.131,000 

M,000 
210,000 
21.000 

solooo 

2i.0O0 

la^ooo 
3*7 im 

•20.000 

ffi:ffi 


0.4 

28 :o 
30:0 

27:3 


i I 
' I 

K:m,ooo 

13,009,000 
8.1(40.000 




Oktob^ 


•ffiS 






g^J|^n« 




SwUaixa 


Sffl 














WmahinsUn 






7.BOBflO0 


BOS... 
D03... 


ai.oasa 


11 
Ii 

28.8 

0:1 

21.8 




iii 


IS 


1 .8 
1 .T 


4: 100 
41 100 
4' MO 

i S 

41 01 

i i 

i i 


jr . 

41 

1 

1 






















886... 













175 



UNITED STATES, 1911. 



principal crops o/ th« United StuUaii 
State* Agricultural DeiHtrtment.) 





SraiKQ Whbai. 


0*1. 




Aonw. 


Y»ld 


PttHlUO- 

lion. 


ToUl 


»^ 


Ynic 
per 


Prwluc- 


Tot.1 


H^e 


Act«j^ 


Bush 

11,0 


BtuhBla. 


Doll an. 


135.00a 

12,000 
78:000 

J 

1,121.000 
4.000 
4t.0DO 

!!!» 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

oo 

00 

00 
00 

00 
00 
00 

00 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

oo 

00 

48.000 

281,000 


Buah 

38.1 
38.8 

1] 

r. 

30.0 

1;! 
'ii 
II 

i;i 

i3:« 

11 
il 
ll 


BiuhM ■. 
3,1»8J]00 
-"-"00 

!! 

00 

ii 

i 

00 

00 
00 

00 
00 
1 00 
00 
00 

1 00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

00 

00 

00 

00 
00 

00 
00 






i.mo 


3T.B 


W^ 


3S.IXI0 




















































































































































































































ESS::::::: 


mooo 

M0.000 


U.t 


« 


ass 

4^12,000 








North Dakota:... 
South EhikoU... 


l.tfiCOOO 


,!:! 




«M4g^ 
1!.4«8.000 

■a:!8S 


































































































200JX» 

ujno 

1 

ITOflOO 


15.0 

m:o 


I.ITO.OOO 

(.OTo.ooo 

.'S 

'uo^ooo 
mImbIooo 


IfS 

«.t»0 

9i8,ooa 

.las 

2,?BS.00a 




Wj^^^ 




NawUedoo 






































E 

10 


1 

13 

i; 

14 


i I 

i i 

23 se 

i s 

It 41 


i i 

i i 

IE 43 


98 

IS 

J 


ii 

2S.0 

Is 


Si 

flge.707.809 
T07.34S.404 
fi24.448.U7 


.061 


















■«■« 










«^ 


IWG... 





CROPS OP THE 



Aereagi, production and homt mi«« of A* 





Bablbt. 


Sn. 




AoraiV^ 


^ 


Produc- 
tion. 


Taxtl 


A.,..„ 


^'' 


Produc- 


Tol«l 




lloOQ 
12,01X1 


M*0 


Bushel*. 
111,000 


Bollan. 

'SI;!!! 

309.000 


Aeret 


Buih 


Biuhili. 


DolUn. 












inoo 




4B:oOO 






























8.666 

■a!!! 

285,000 

28!ooa 

48,000 


a.s 

s:i 

4.8 
1.0 


3wZ 

4>O4:0O0 
1B,000 

uiiooo 

187,000 
80[000 

iwiooo 




Sl^E 


k. 80,000 


U.O 


2.000.000 


1,940,000 


'M 




7,000 


u.o 


17S,000 


114,000 


i.4«:ooo 




■ ioiooo 


nio 


92,000 

isolooo 


£S 




























































20,000 

s 

1,475:000 

slooo 
uo.ooo 


ib:o 

li 

M.O 


—'too 

1 CO 

3 CO 
30 00 

10 00 


30>01.000 

28,904.000 

10,184,000 

90,000 

'!:!!!:!!! 

792.009 
OTS.ODO 

7i:r 


(oo.ooo 

s 
s 

81,000 

s 

1.000 


e'.o 

4.1 

<.e 

!:! 

10 

1.9 
0.0 


l.DDoloOO 

.a!!8 

fl.O88.0OO 
4.488,000 
HoioOO 

198.000 
IM^OOO 
















!S=.:::::: 


!:SS 






KSKS:::: 


*!!:!!! 






^^■■e:-. 


S 






















io:«» 


18.0 


100.000 


(1,000 


1.C09 

4,000 

iloco 
2i!ooa 


10.0 

11 


10,000 
184.000 




OUkboma 




IS 

uiODO 
34.000 

1 ,000 

1«,000 
17 ,000 
11 ,000 
l.4W,OO0 


li 

asio 


1.070,000 
37*,O00 
2.IM.000 
W.000 
1.278,000 
1,032,000 
UO.DCIO 
S,9M,000 
e,M2,0D0 
8,944.000 

40,000,000 


728,000 
280.000 

1.112.000 
081,000 

wolooo 

4,178,000 

i!h4|ooo 

94JI10.000 


S&---: 


















S.000 


It.S 


78,000 










i:!!! 

■a 


21.1 


■»!!! 

181,000 

188,000 




Wudiinaton 






110.000 


ToWd»— 911... 

£;: 

907... 

1;; 

SOB... 
808.. 
807.. 


UBa,us 

S.7I1i.ll» 


31.0 

1;? 
1 


II 00 

ii i 

'1 i 


139.181.000 

IS 

19.S91Z54 
23.0Si»9 


ifffi 

ii 

ill 

1.8Se.308 
I.T03,M1 


Ii 

i 

17.0 


w!b«jm 


17.M7,000 
13,088.000 

ii^Tsim 

lli»».»47 



177 



UNITED STATES, 1911. 



pritieipal crops of Iht UniUd StaUt in 1911. 

OnlMd StBtM Asrieultiml Daputmoit.) 







Hi.. 




Aemcb 


ST 


Prodoo- 
tion. 


Total 

™ioe. 


Acms^ 


Y«ld 
par 


Frodi»- 

tiOD. 


ss. 




u.ooo 

a 

S.000 


Biuh 

11 


BuBhelL 

■g:ffi 


DoLIu*. 
919.000 

■IS 


00 
CO 
00 
00 
00 
00 
CO 
00 
00 

00 

00 
00 
00 
00 

I 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 


.09 

1 

.09 

1 
il 

1.30 

.OS 
.H 

.82 

lioo 

.80 
.90 

'1 

1 
1 

i 

a 
il 


00 

00 

I 

i 

i 
i 

00 

i 

00 

00 
00 

■& 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

00 
00 

00 




Ssffi?;;;; 




WBe-. 


13.000 

"IS 

34.000 


!!:S 

30.0 

l\ 

ISO 

i»:o 


.JSffl 

300,000 

"tsooo 
jwiooo 

3S1.000 

SAVOOO 

looiooo 


1 09.000 

i,3ii7.aoa 
ibIooo 
101,000 

2M,000 

sa 




^E-}}}. 




ffiaSfc:: 






























10,000 
E,DO0 

i 


21.0 

io:o 


309.000 
72^000 

i,%M,ooa 

311.000 
131.000 

■as 


■iiS 

«S,000 

as 

W.DOO 










































IS! 


1!:! 


K 


IS:!!! 














»,000 


11.0 


U.000 


38,000 














































































































i 

4K 


no 

i 

E 






































































































Tol*l^-lBll... 
IMS*'* 




1 


7,H8,ODO 

ass 
Pi 

4.985,061 
1.008.330 

11 

iiii 


13,7311,000 

naTBS 
uo.Taa 

IMSI>T9 

•ffi:;! 


Ai 00 

I I 

I \ 
I i 

4J U 
4S ™ 


!l3 

.92 

K 

,93 

!m 

.28 


BOlaT&OOO 

11 

9e«9TJ>T« 


BM.970.000 

11 



CROPS OF THE UNITED STATES, 1911, 

Acreage, production and homt vtUue of the principal cropt of tiia United Statt* in 1911 
(At BBtimued b; tbe nalt«d SUtM Acrlcollurai Depftrtment.) 





FLAZaBKD. 


ToaxccD. 




Acnw. 


Yield 


Produo- 


TOMI 


a™„. 


Yield 
par 


Produo- 


Total 
nhM. 




Aeam. 


Bosh. 


Biuhdi. 


Dolln. 


ACTW. 


LbL 


Poimdt 


D<dl>n. 












iSS 


1.700 


170,000 

.3!!! 


I.848.0W 










































■isis 


s 


1ZZ 


'M 
































40,000 


1.420 


M.820,000 


0,2011.400 






















3«,000 

'Sffi 

a',eoo 

1.000 


S5 

i 

040 

a 








































11.580.400 






















'SS 






















'■Si 
































Wimndn 


10,000 

100 000 
ISOOO 
18,000 

t,axi,ooo 

•?:!!? 

7t.O0O 


Is 
li 

3:0 


10.000 


137,000 

TO.WK) 
18.781.000 

' 18,000 
488.000 


41,000 


1,250 


51.1{O,0O0 


5.125,000 














8,(00 


800 


43».000 








































848.000 

"•a 


880 
700 


808.800,000 

02,870,000 
140,000 














^M 


fepi"----' 




















(00 

800 


4£0 


238,660 
195,000 




















a.o 


1.000 


B.O0O 






800 


000 


480.000 






415,000 


7.7 


■■j,m;6oo- 


















>,000 


7.U 


11,000 


W,000 




































































































































































ToUl«— 811... 

908. ■-■ 


7K,t>00 

3,ei(i,ooo 

"•Sffi 

3M.1X10 
J0e.9ZT 

1 


i 

10; 8 
7:8 


11 
11 

29,284,880 


M,27a,ooo 

IS 

24.T1 3,000 
80,811.001 


1,013.800 

'BiS 

820.800 

..ffiS 

1,080.73* 


BS1.7 
7V7.8 

is:* 

^■°, 

797.8 


i i 

OS 00 

i i 

82 S3 


88 

i 

T8 

1 

80 
























































897.. 





















0BOP8 OF THE UNITED STATES, 1911. 

Acreage, production and home value of the principal crops of the United States i: 
(As eatlm&ted br tb« United BUtei Agrloultaral Deparlmeot.) 

POUJTOW CbUBB). 



VermoDt 

HuaaohuMtu 

Rbode taUmt. . . . 

CoaoBCllcut. 

MeirYork 

New Jarasy 

PMuuylTuua 

MmiMBd.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Viqiiiila 

WaatViiviii* 

North Cuolin*.. . 
S«ilhCui4iiw... 

FIonSr.'.V,V.','X 
Ohio 

lll[noi».'.'.";:i" 
Uichiaui 

WiaoonaD 

Uiiuuaota. ...... 

North Dil'koU.'.'! 
South DbIeom. . . 
NobTHlu 

Ktat aeky ' !'.'.'.'.'. 
UwlBip^'.'.'.'.'.' 

Wrominc 

Cdomlo 

NawUsiiaD 

Dt»h. ..'.'.";;;*; 

Ncvwta 

Idaho 

WwhioKtoa 

dSmiiy.'.'. 

Total*— 1911.. 
leio. . 

19m.. 
190S .. 
1*07... 
IBM.. 

i«oe.. 

IWM.. 
1S03.. 
1902.. 
1901.. 
1900.. 
1899.. 
180B.. 
1897.. 



EXPORTS OP FLOUR AND GRAIN FROM THE 
UNITED STATES FOR A SERIES OF TEARS. 

from ptMicationt 
Vommerce and 1 



* From the Principai Customs Districts. 



^ET&ci;,. 


Flour. 
Bik. 


"sr- 


"r- 


■Jf 


te 


■^^ 




11 
•Sffi. 

87»,1M 


1,383,718 


11,371,710 

tM 

U.«31,710 
IBl.lOl 

363.831 

1, 75.001 
S,7«3.87; 


a 




















iwiaio 








3JS3.311 


im 












7!<li 

7.703,031 
1,134,873 
87i:iOl 

!l«.3QS 


s 


























713.077 
1.231308 

■SS! 


KftMl 








K 
S 


i;«7 
















iiCiw 




wn 




ss 








SSSraiiV.;::::::: 


ixxnx 


i.oe3.nt 












11.M7.34I 


3i.s«i,ua 


»,»07,887 


IDSlffl* 


lUS 










11,MI,«19 


31.«e7,lM 
4B,Hl«gS 

sa.ii3,iai 


s 


i§^ 


1.S 








I'M 


(LlOLTIl 



181 



GRAIN CROPS OF THE WORLD. 

77^ latest official and commercial estimatea revised up to February 1, 1911, 

(FuniatMd by the Board's bpmUI foreign oorrespondent, Mr. George J. S. BroomhAll, 

Fellow of the Royal Statistioal Sooiety.) 



Austria. 

Hungary • 

Croatia and Slavonia. . . . 
Bosnia and Heraegovina 

Germanv 

Denmark. 

Sweden 

Norway 

Holland 

Belgium 

France 

Great Britain and Ireland 
Rueaia and Poland . . . . ) 

Gauoaaus V 

Siberia ( 

Roumania 

Bnl^iia and Roumelia . 

Servia 

Greece 

Italy 

Switaerland 

Spain 

PortogaU 

Cyprua, Bfalta, etc 

Tunis . r !.'!!!!!!!'.!!!! ! 

Gape Colony and Natal . . 

Turfcy.SyriaV.*.'.* '.!.','{ 

AAtk Minor f 

India 

Japan. 

Aigentine 

Anstralia and N. Zealand 

Uruguay 

cm. 

Mexico. 

United States 

f^anada ■ 

Total 



(Mille bu.) 



1911 



66,000 

176,800 

16.000 

3,400 

140,000 

4.000 

8,300 

340 

4,000 

13,000 

830,000 

63,900 

608,000 

91.300 
68,000 
14.400 

3,300 
193,000 

4,000 
166,660 

9,600 

3,400 
36,000 

6.400 
10.080 
46,100 

68,670 

1867,000 

30,800 

170,400 

84,000 

9,600 

14.000 

6.600 

631,600 

316,000 



8,606,360 



1910 



67.680 

169.600 

13.300 

3,400 

141,930 

4,730 

7.040 

300 

4.340 

13,000 

361.170 

68,330 

833,070 

107,300 

66,690 

13,330 

3,400 

163,600 

3,300 

136,000 

9.300 

3,400 

40.000 

6.600 

3,690 

46,870 

66.333 

367.000 

33.080 

136.000 

106.000 

9.000 

30,000 

9,300 

686,300 

160,000 



3,643,363 



Rtb. 
(MiUe bu.) 



1911 



103,700 
64,860 



430 

436.640 

30.670 

34,000 

860 

17.140 

33.140 

47.140 

1,710 

608,060 

6,000 

9,430 

860 

130 

6,140 

1,710 

31.700 

4,800 



1.000 

17,140 
'43^850 



34.380 
3,670 



1.880^760 



1910 



08.670 
66,060 



340 

414.000 

18,000 

34,000 

800 

16.430 

17,140 

44,570 

1,710 

863,300 

8,670 

9.430 

860 

110 

6,140 

1.710 

36,670 

8,600 



600 

17,600 
'40300' 



86.860 
1,500 



1,706.660 



Barubt. 
(MiUe bu.) 



1911 



74.360 
76,440 



7.560 

141.670 

35,000 

14.170 

3.500 

3.300 

5.000 

50.830 

60,000 

408.330 

35,000 
30,830 

6,870 

7,790 

10,830 

460 

90,000 

11,330 

3,000 
41,670 
13,600 

3.980 
16.960 

53,710 

186,670 

47.500 

9.170 

3,310 

1,010 

1.700 

14.670 

174.000 

47.600 



1.665,400 



1910 



65,900 
59,800 



3.300 

133,330 

31,660 

14,170 

3.300 

3,300 

4.160 

43,500 

65,830 

473,500 

30,830 

16.660 

3.000 

5.000 

9.160 

500 

85,000 

10^600 

3.000 

'48.330 

11,660 

1,600 

13,500 

43,000 

175,000 

56,660 

7,500 

8,800 

800 

3,100 

13.500 

173,830 

46.660 



1,648,340 



Oats. 
(Mille bu.) 



1911 



156,060 
95,490 



1,070 

531.060 

49.150 

75.060 

10.460 

18,060 

41,800 

850,550 

194,750 

859,560 

37,550 

14.350 

5.150 

1.080 

43.750 

4.740 

35,000 

15.130 



13,300 

3,780 

13,060 



34,380 



4.130 

60.800 

88,000 

3,060 

3,710 

13.000 

933.000 

368,000 



3,993,830 



1910 



138375 
77,900 



4,750 

544,350 

46,550 

88,600 

10.450 

33.800 

88,000 

331,550 

313,800 

1,045,000 

84,300 
11,400 

1,770 

650 

38,500 

5.130 
30.300 
13,780 



11.400 
5,640 
7.180 



38,350 



3,876 

57.000 

83.000 

476 

1,540 

13,780 

1,180.000 

333.000 



4,350,345 



xHarrwIad m April, 1911. 



182 
WORLD'S WHEAT CROP IN DETAIL. 

According io Hungarian Minister of Agriculture, 



OHIBT IMPOKTINO GOUNTBIBS. 




Great Britain 

France 

Germany 

Austria 

Italy 

Holland 

Switzerland 

Belgium 

Denmark 

Scandinavia 

Spain 

Portugal 

Greece 

Turkey 

CHIBF EXPORTING G0UNTRIB8. 

Russia, Siberia and Caucasus 

Hungary, Croatia and Slavonia 

Boumania 

Bulgaria and Eastern Rumella 

Servia 

East Indies 

Australia 

Argentina 

Ohm 

United States 

Canada , 

Algiers , 

Tunis and Tripoli 

Uruguay 

Mexico 

Japan 

Persia , 

Cyprus , 

British South Africa 



bu. 

64,166,000 

319,477,000 

149,OM,000 

5d,740,000 

191,986,000 

6,646,000 

8,483.000 

14,300,000 

5,023,000 

7,956,000 

148,170,000 

10,083,000 

10,266,000 

45,100,000 

58,166.000 



508.680.000 

187,860,000 

96,443,000 

61,600,000 

14,670,000 

370.850.000 

100,690,000 

139,830,000 

83,0(10,000 

617,670,000 

118,870,000 

36,790,000 

8.800,000 

9,720.000 

9.170,000 

34,940,000 



10.080.000 



1910. 



bn. 

58,720,000 

803,200,000 

lSa880,000 

58.560,000 

176,300.000 

5.120,000 

8,280,000 

12,880,000 

4.770,000 

6.950,000 

139.500,000 

9.200,000 

6,650,000 

45,870,000 

65,000,000 



768,800.000 

180,768,000 

106,650,000 

58,725,000 

12,900.000 

851,200.000 

91,8oa000 

128,800,000 

24,200,000 

612,600,000 

106,400,000 

44,000,000 

11,060.000 

0.200,000 

10,500,000 

20,960,000 



8,700,000 



WHEAT CROP ESTIMATES 

Lssxied by tfie Hungarian Minister of Agriculture^ at Budapest. 

(Furnished by the Board's special foreign correspondent, Mr. George J. S. Broomhall, 

Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society.) 

GENERAL SUMMARY. 



Wbkat— Aggregate production of the Importing countries. 

Deficit as compared with their annual consumption 

Aggregate prcKluction of exporting countries 

Surplus available by them for export 

Total World's crop 

Net deficit or surplus of stocks and production com- 
pared with consumption 

Rte— Total World's crop 

Oats— Total World's crop 

Maize -Total World's crop 

BAHLsr— Total World's crop 



t Surplus. 1191. — Deficit. 



1911. 



bu. 

1,093.150.000 
5SO.320.000 

2,430,040,000 
401,600,000 

3.532.190.000 



—178,820.000 



l,7a''>.220.000 
3.911.050,000 
3.545.380.000 
1,625,100,000 



1910. 



bu. 

9G6.80aO0O 
567,040.000 

2,600.000,000 
632.800,000 

3,646.800,000 



1 64,860,000 



1,718,400,000 
3,640,000,000 
3,928.800.000 
1,561,600.000 



183 



SM 






ill 



1 
i 



184 



WINTER AND SPRING WHEAT RAISED AND 



Coanti< 



MOBTHimif Dirmoif. 

Boone 

Bureau 

Oarroll 

Cook. 

DeKalb 

DuPace 

Grundy 

Henderson 

Henry 

Iroquois. 

Jo Daviess. 

Kane 

Kankakee 

Kendall 

Knox 

Lake 

LaSaUe 

Lee 

Livingston 

Marshall 

If oHenry 

Mercer .•...«••• 

Ogle 

Peoxia 

Putnam 

Rock Island 

Stark 

Stephenson 

Warren 

Whiteade 

WiU 

Winnebago 

Woodford 

CSNTBAI. DrVUXON. 

Adams 

Brown 

Calhoun 

Cass 

Champaign 

Christian 

Clark 

Coles 

Cumberland 

DeWitt 

Douglas 

Edgar 

Ford 

Fulton 

Greene 

Hanoook 

Jersey 




3.834 

10,420 

1.153 

6,138 

613 

6,700 

47 

11.1M 

3,467 

3.684 

840 

1.860 

10317 
2.894 
8.681 
1,481 
1.317 

26.664 
4.688 
1.840 
1,067 
8,688 
420 

20.300 
3.061 
1.092 
1.146 
6.332 
6.148 

22.121 
1,067 
1.081 
1^76 



61366 

10,736 

17326 

13,916 

606 

28.038 

10,800 

10.112 

6301 

8.782 

3.159 

16.646 

4.186 

5.176 

29.467 

80337 

17362 



as 

|i 



ill 



n 



46.008 


6,112 


365.750 


21303 


27.766 


1,537 


92.482 


6,851 


12.260 


817 


167308 


8341 


912 


63 


09320 


14.926 


39.957 


4,628 


63.639 


4.712 


16384 


1,132 


66338 


2,467 


234384 


14,423 


67363 


3359 


24.903 


4,908 


30.166 


1,975 


36331 


1.756 


676.430 


35.405 


78.928 


6,051 


31,413 


2,453 


21301 


1.423 


46.444 


4.786 


8316 


560 


275.712 


27.187 


79.020 


6.268 


18.404 


1.456 


18.256 


1327 


117.408 


7.109 


65,661 


8.197 


436,140 


29.496 


27302 


1.409 


17,758 


1.441 


23,506 


1.833 


1,027,006 


68.741 


145388 


14313 


417,700 


22.907 


234,080 


18356 


13,752 


798 


440344 


30.717 


106.404 


14.400 


189,644 


13.488 


67,440 


7368 


68376 


5.048 


62313 


4312 


872.630 


22,060 


96366 


5380 


60.863 


6.900 


699313 


89389 


234346 


40,449 


322,184 


23306 




15,481 
43.976 
18.035 
2,405333 
33.457 
33.433 
24.162 

9.724 
41.736 
35.643 
22.657 
91.862 
40.762 
10,777 
46,150 
55,058 
90.132 
27,750 
40,465 
15,679 
32309 
19.723 
27.864 
100356 

7,561 
70,404 
10,098 
36321 
23313 
34307 
84371 
63,153 
203O6 



64388 
10397 
8,610 
17,372 
61,829 
34394 
23317 
34317 
14381 
18.906 
19.591 
27336 
17.096 
49339 
22363 
30,638 
13,954 



I 

a 

8 

■51 

11 



61,924 
175.900 

72.140 

9,620,982 

133328 

133.728 

96,648 

88396 
166,944 
142,172 

90,628 
867.448 
163.008 

48,106 
184.636 
220332 
360328 
111,000 
151,860 

62.716 
130,086 

78392 
111,466 
401,020 

30.244 
281316 

40.392 
147384 

93362 
138.028 
837.484 
852312 

82.024 



858362 
41388 
34.440 
09.488 

207316 

138376 
94.068 

138,068 
57.184 
75.024 
78364 

109344 
68,384 

198.196 
89.462 

122352 
65316 






1i 



•9 

a 



I 



67.036 
197.793 

73.077 

9.627.783 

134.646 

142.609 

96,711 

63321 
171307 
140384 

91,700 
809316 
in,431 

40.907 
188344 
222307 
802384 
140.406 

107311 

06,109 
131,459 

88,077 
112310 
428307 

86312 
288,072 

41319 
164303 
101,449 
107323 
888393 
264,063 

83,857 



827,093 

65301 

67,407 

88.048 

208.109 

109,083 

106.408 

161361 

04302 

80,007 

82370 

131.404 

73.904 

206.000 

128.741 

108,001 

79319 



i 



CO 



U7367 



26.139 
15399' 



67468 
30306 



430,026 



48306 



207.017 



099316 

89382 

360398 

140387 



271.761 



88383 
2.448 



241326 
22392 



470371 

71346 

242366 



2 



21,Q» 



45311 

9,536301 

122386 



96,799 



131,610 
83346 
76376 

8133n 



164.0(1 
192341 
820363 



88383 

38,766 

109,968 

37333 

108400 

162,486 



204,068 
23,683 

303W 
46.798 



811,691 

336396 

00353 



101357 



2304 



12381 
29.963 



164333 



CONSUMED IN THE STATE OF ILUNOIS IN 1911. 



CotukHa*. 


5'. 


11 


jll 


1 


1 
11 


11- 


1 


1 




Si 

1 
!S 

21JST 

asi 

t,iw 

HJWO 
IB.OIS 

1,308 

:n 
& 

as 

IS 

1,100 

"S 


S:S 

1S8,5S« 
l,24a,i73 
K3/IIS 

H/I6S 

1 
US 

"ii 

ib!t23 
in.0M 

17(1370 
S2«,U8 

iioItm 

1.101, MB 
10SH3 

1.1U3S3 
3S1,»3 

si 


s 
i 

ijl 

31^90 

IKI,U7 
27^10 

i 
i 

IS 

ii8,nB 

1,M7 

u,us 


ss 

.IS 
iB 

■ilasa 

Ki 

3SMa 

as 
si 

IU18 
S9il30 

ss 

1111.870 
213H 

IS 


I7S/Bi 

i 

lia.TTi 

1M.108 
111.W* 

8a;t») 

71,038 
110,444 
G73M 
90,044 

mIosi 

11 

11 


i 
i 

i 

u 

31 

a 

1 

i 

i 
;: 

Si 

1 

1 


4t,t8t 






17,150 










U,U7 




•ii 

UO.»H 
















































■wtiji 




"aim 




















1,878 

iSffl 


















330JIW 

mm 

■-«,JM- 


































■■lIM»' 
101.406 
SMJll 


























tJHl 




SeM30 

■■-■wm' 

GH.T48 

K! 

eoijw 


^^^I> 






























IWW 















1911 CORN CHOP 



t 111,710 

m.iti 



tS78,70T . 

lIllTtSK) ! 



OF ILLINOIS. 



187 



CcnmtlM. 


1 


1 

r 


5 

s 


1 


t 

■3 

s 
3 




f 


1 


1 




81 

i 

S3 
M 

OS 

01 
87 

33 

isioso 

2t.ilU 

"■-JO 
K 
07 

M 

73 

i 

TS 
M 
13 


1 

43 

30 
30 
40 

IS 

u 

i 

22 
28 
2J 
TO 

3D 


5,i SI 

•■! S 

i » 

■i i 
j 1 

i s 
Si 

J47.711 
H4.2H 
198.600 

e&3,iifi 

lU.MO 

Mg,H4 

M1I.31S 
1.053,622 

iM,isa 

3M.M0 

40i!7Da 

63S.W0 
*«,»S2 

1,718.0W 
413,124 
44a;472 
243,686 
313.916 
34*638 
1S3.US 

1.181.925 
300,920 
009.37S 

e4s!92S 

1.3T4;»77 
B13.370 


"i 

i 

i 

ii 

12 

50 

B 

60 
10 

58 

1 

53 
112 

*7 

82 

K 

60 
47 

51 


31 

DO 
8« 

73 

30 

33 

1 

45 

i 

81 
67 

80 
85 

S 

25 

' f, 

00 

iSCiia 

198)506 
M9.B5fl 
591,191 
M8.156 

23i:021 

7281736 
258,053 


78 
IDO 

'Si 

ii 

St 

i: 

6 85 

!!! 

90 
58 

10 8 

735 
83 

'ii 

10 45 

si 

10 DO 
5 80 
8 40 

8 85 


529.009 

•s 

444.935 

1.125787 
896,311 

'ii 

1.837,849 

34,709 

IM!671 
t03;528 

2041500 

as 

li!:S 

358.801 
1071900 

Kg 

11 

1451230 
«4:m4 
57,449 

Ii 

48,200 

9o:oeo 

03,374 
33.839 
58,820 


11348.001 
1,809,134 
108,144 

iS 

'753.802 

577.730 
634,089 
1,465;310 
'387.887 

,as 

1,506,573 

i.3iT.i»; 
s^s14 

117.011 

118.771* 

■il:g 

77.834 

FS 

liilfo 

Ii 
'Is 

118,480 

IS 
II 

761104 






















































































t74«,«T 
































































































































188 



1911 OATS CROP 






II 



«S 



CuroU 

Cook. 

DeKsIb 

anmdr." 
Baadanon. . . . 
Smw, 

ElUM 

KaalukM.... 
KoKteU 

U^:'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Lb... .'':::::: 

livliiBfton. . . . 

Peoiia 

PutuBm 

Roaklafaud.. 

Stark 

Stephanaon . . . 

Whitaiide."'.: 

WiU 

Wlnaabwo... 
Woodfrnd.. .. 

Calbouii 

CkH 

^lUtUQ 

Clark 

Colu 

Cumbo'taiid. . . 

Edsu. .'.'!;;:; 

Fopd 



40,050 
4T,STS 



S5J13 
VZ.441 

jgjoi 



tg,l93 



!^0M 

M.TBT 
U,SU 

n3«8 



303,410 
3.8S«.U1 



T4,8S3 
1,341.873 



'W 


»M.6ei' 


























































































































LOOWBI 


IIB,*07 






48,104 

































































OF ILLINOIS. 



COBDti**. 


f 




.s 

1 


ii 


i 


IS 

•sS 

ill 


1 


1 


i 




«.«7 

1 
Sffi 

11.U3 

!K 

IO,na 

IJIO 
18.111 

■ffl 

J 

s 

I:!S 

IS.TM 

tju» 


so 

i 
i 
i 

u 

1 
» 

j 

a 

u 

13 


S 

B17.BTO 

itiIms 

tHO.TU 

,,K 
.Sffi 


i 
1 

It 

i 
i 

It 

3t 

ii 

U 

% 

10 

i 

40 
U 

Bd 

98 

17 

i 

as 

i 

to 


*iS:mi 

K 

!5S 

m^oos 

1SS5» 
4B7,H2 

7.900 

1i 

2.800 

SIS 
Sffl 

IWIS 

13J31 


:i 

li 

781 

!| 

AM 

i 

St 

iS 

80 

DO 

It 
00 

so 

i 

St 

s 
s 

oo 

St 

n 


iS 

!!5:i!S 

8M,778 

«M>1 

7.181 
t7JlJ 

Ttlin 

'S:S 
8S 

!g 

H57e 

7,BM 
t,«3T 

TJ»7 
TO38T 

ro.tM 

17, 80S 

11 


•"iSS 




















IS 

110^1 












j£^*™'«n' 




















w^a 


















u« 








nWUBH DITMON. 




































■K 










•ffl 










»a 




















■!S 










T«S 


"nJi^o 


i.asa 














Pjnr 
























'S 













































190 



1911 WINTER RYE 



Gonntlet. 



HOBTSaBX DirmoH. 



Boone 

Bureau. . . . 

OarroU 

Ck>ok 

DeKalb... 
DuPace... 
Onmdy . . . 
Henderson. 
Henry. . . . 
Iroquois. . . 
Jo DaviesB. 

Kane 

Kankakee. 
Kendall . . . 

B^ox 

Lake 

LaSaUe.... 
Lee. 



Livingston. . 
Marshall.. . . 
McHenry. . . 

Meroer 

Ogle 

Peoria 

Putnam .... 
Rook Island 

Stark 

Stephenson . 
Warren .... 
Whiteside . . 
Will 



Winnebago 
Woodford . 



CENTRAL DrViaiON. 

Adams 

Brown 

Calhoun 

Cass 

Champaign 

Christian 

Clark 

Coles 

Cumberland 

DeWitt 

Douglas 

Edgar 

Ford 

Fulton 

Greene 

Hancock 

Jersey 




1,460 
121 

3,456 

1.88S 

604 

688 

14 

1,646 

l.«5g 
70 

S.141 
696 

2.172 
40 
166 
810 
841 
080 
276 
M 
801 

8.429 

1.403 
317 
176 
606 
266 

4.644 
620 

1,608 
490 

7.252 
231 



305 
11 
11 

165 
36 

120 

no 

84 

86 

245 

102 

249 

"9 
36 

4n 

2 



e 



17 
19 
22 
26 
19 
26 
19 
19 
19 
19 
21 
26 
19 
19 

8 
22 
21 
21 
19 
20 
20 
16 
28 

9 
18 
16 
15 
25 
20 
16 
19 
13 
16 



14 
15 
16 
13 
16 
16 
15 
16 
11 
16 
15 
16 

'26" 
16 
11 
16 









24,762 

2,299 

76.010 

48,968 

9,676 

14,700 

266 

29,374 

37 221 

1.330 

44.961 

14.900 

41,268 

760 

1,328 

17,820 

7,161 

20.769 

5.225 

1.980 

16.020 

54.864 

39.284 

2.863 

3.150 

7.576 

3.990 

113,600 

10.400 

25.728 

9.310 

94.276 

3.465 



4.270 

165 

176 

2.146 

560 

1.800 

1.650 

1,344 

935 

8.920 

1.530 

3.9S4 

"iso' 

660 

6,247 

32 



b 


of erop. 
t 1, 1911 




*o . 

8s 


Price 
bush 


II 


Cost 
duetJ 
acre. 


Totol 
prodi 


10 71 


$17,574 


$1120 


$16,807 


90 


2,000 


980 


1,180 


76 


67.007 


960 


32322 


75 


86.718 


806 


10363 


74 


7,086 


965 


4313 


75 


11.025 


9 15 


6380 


74 


197 


10 86 


146 


74 


21.737 


9 45 


14,610 


74 


27,644 


970 


19302 


74 


984 


750 


626 


62 


27376 


770 


16,480 


76 


11,324 


10 90 


0,490 


74 


30.538 


760 


10307 


74 


562 


9 75 


390 


75 


996 


9 85 


1,035 


80 


14.256 


9 60 


7.770 


70 


6.013 


10 00 


3,410 


70 


14,538 


9 70 


9.693 


74 


3,866 


860 


2305 


70 


1.386 


935 


026 


75 


12.015 


966 


7.730 


74 


40,599 


986 


32.061 


70 


27.499 


9 80 


13.749 


78 


2.226 


10 20 


3.233 


67 


2.110 


9 20 


1310 


86 


6,439 


835 


4,217 


76 


2.992 


8 10 


2.155 


77 


87.472 


8 30 


37.716 


70 


7.280 


9 15 


4.758 


67 


17.238 


9 20 


14,794 


74 


6.889 


865 


4.238 


70 


65.993 


896 


64.905 


76 


2,599 


950 


2,194 


75 


3,202 


9 70 


2.958 


68 


96 


790 


87 


72 


127 


895 


98 


70 


1,601 


7 15 


1.180 


72 


403 


830 


290 


70 


1,260 


8 50 


1,020 


90 


1,485 


7 16 


786 


72 


968 


925 


777 


75 


701 


635 


540 


72 


2322 


925 


2300 


65 


494 


10 55 


1,070 


72 


2.868 


686 


1.700 


70 


126 


10 85 


08 


72 


403 


945 


331 


75 


3.935 


9 10 


4.341 


72 


23 


820 


10 



s 



$1367 
883 

24,185 

19306 

2378 

6,645 

62 

7,127 

8342 

450 

11300 

432s 

14,031 

172 

■'6,486* 
1.603 
4,046 
1301 
460 
4385 
8338 
13,750 

600 
2,222 

837 
40,767 
2322 
2.444 
2,651 
1.088 

406 



244 

20 
321 
113 
240 
600 
101 
161 
556 

l.i62* 

*28' 
72 



J 



I3O8 



82 



406 



CROP OF ILLINOIS. 



191 



Coimtiet. 



liaoon 

liaoottpin.. . . 

Blaaon 

IfoDonough.. 

If eLean 

Menard 

MoDtsomery . 

Morsan 

Moultrie 

Piatt. 

Pike 



ion 

Sehuyler 

Soott 

Shelby 

VermiUon 

aoUTHUur oituion. 



Alexander, 

Bond 

Clay 

Clinton 

Cimwford. . 
Edwards. . 

Fayette . . , 
Franklin. . 
Gallatin.., 
Hamilton. , 
Hajrdin. . . . 
Jackson . . , 

Jasper 

Jefferson . . 
Johnson. . . 
Lawrence. , 
Madison. . , 
Marion. . . , 



Monroe 

Perry 

Pope 

Pulaski 

Randolph . . 
Richland . . . 

SaUne 

St. Clair 

Union 

Wabash 

Waahinston. 

Wayne 

WMte 

Wilfiamson . 




90 
107 



824 

79 

601 

22 

148 

1,043 

24 

3 

57 

40 

48 

85 

200 

0S6 

123 



2 
430 
6 
3 
13 
7 

05 
92 
12 
40 
114 
1 

11 

3 

21 



10 

111 

21 

139 

861 

45 

4 



16 
25 



8 
19 
16 
20 
16 
16 
16 
16 
15 
15 
16 
25 

8 
15 
18 



13 
9 
20 
13 
6 
13 
8 
10 
13 
13 
15 
13 
13 
15 
15 
12 
10 
13 
13 
15 
12 
10 
13 






1,440 
2,675 



2,502 

1,501 

8,016 

440 

2368 

16.688 

884 

48 

855 

600 

768 

2.125 

2,152 

14,040 

2,214 



26 

8,870 

120 

39 

78 

91 

760 

920 

156 

520 

1.710 

13 

143 

45 

315 

108 

190 

1.443 

273 

2,085 

4332 

460 

62 



s| 



10 72 
65 



76 
77 
72 
70 
72 
77 
72 
72 
86 
87 
60 
75 
70 
60 
76 



75 
70 
75 
75 
60 
76 
72 
72 
75 
76 
86 
76 
86 
67 
70 
70 
70 
76 
76 
60 
75 
85 
70 




$1,037 
1.739 



1,944 

1.156 

5.772 

308 

1.705 

12360 

276 

35 

735 

622 

461 

1394 

1306 

8,424 

1.660 



19 

2.709 

90 

29 

89 

68 

547 

662 

117 

390 

1.463 

10 

122 

80 

220 

76 

133 

1,082 

205 

1.251 

3349 

382 

36 




31 



$8 60 
8 10 



8 70 
11 75 
10 20 

9 45 



7 
9 
7 
7 
9 



85 
20 
05 
65 
25 



11 05 
680 

10 30 

11 75 
805 
795 



6 
7 
7 
9 
6 



60 
55 
30 
35 
10 



9 60 

7 60 
880 
800 
885 
990 

11 75 

8 25 
600 

9 06 

7 80 

8 55 
10 90 



60 
80 
85 
65 
25 



774 
867 



2319 
928 

6.110 
206 

1.088 

9396 

169 

23 

527 

442 

326 

875 

3,161 

7335 

978 



13 

3346 

44 

28 
79 
66 

722 

764 
96 

864 

1.129 

12 

91 

18 

190 
70 

162 
1310 

136 
1.084 
2334 

844 
37 



I 



$ 268 

872 



228 
662 
100 
617 
8354 
107 

12 
206 

80 
135 
719 



682 



46 
1 



2 



21 

36 

824 



31 

12 

.80 

6 



69 
167 
415 

88 



J 



$ 875 



1.655 



i587 



40 



175 
102 



29 
128 



558 
25 
1 
84 
65 
11 

162 

2 

02 

122 



8 
10 
13 
13 
13 
16 
16 
17 
25 
10 



4.424 

260 

13 

1.092 
845 
165 

2392 
34 

1360 

1320 



00 
66 
75 
76 
75 
70 
90 
70 
70 
00 



4.424 
162 
10 
810 
634 
116 

2333 
24 

1.086 

1320 



9 10 
11 00 

5 95 
10 70 



60 
70 
30 



800 
8 25 
8 36 



6,032 
276 
6 
899 
429 
107 

1.183 

16 

511 

1319 



205 

8 

1,160 

8 

574 

201 



606 
113 



80 



*If tiie erop were soldi at thej prevailing J price August 1, it would return this amount to the 
prodi 



192 



1911 BARLEY CROP 



CountiM. 



XOBTBaSM oimioii. 



Boone.... 
Bureau. . . . 
OwioU... 

Cook. 

DeKalb.., 
DuPace... 
Qrunoy . . 
Henderson 
Henry . . . , 
IroqucHB. . , 
Jo Davi 




016 
67 
l,iM 
806 
8,7M 
1,146 






18 
86 
M 
SB 
86 
88 



118,046 

1,486 

88.974 

8,640 

68,180 

26,318 



10 86 
80 
86 

73 
80 
00 




806,068 

1,140 

83,188 

6,149 

64,680 

83,091 




81106 
70 
080 
9 10 
980 
10 60 



I 



I 




I 



i 



164,811 
668 

14,600 

8,776 

86,716 

18,148 



841,777 

687 

18,488 

8,874 

87,806 

10,648 



Kankakee , 
Kendall . . , 
Knox . . . . , 

Lake 

LaSalle... 



20 
8,684 



86 
87 



600 

99,468 



80 
76 



400 
74,601 



9 76 
10 80 



106 
87,6n 



1,168 

668 

66 

99 



87 
86 
86 
86 



81,866 

88,880 

1.660 

8,476 



73 
80 
80 
80 



88,613 

18.704 

1,880 

1,080 



700 
10 60 

960 
10 00 



8,106 

7,081 

687 

990 



87,084 



14,406 

11,688 

098 

990 



LivinsBton. . 
ICanhall.... 
MeHenry. . . 

If eroer 

Offle 

Peoria 

Putnam .... 
Rock Island 

Stark 

Stephenson . 
Warren .... 
Whiteside.. 
Will 



673 
44 

768 



88 

80 
80 



18376 

1,880 

88,740 



70 
86 
86 



18.818 

1,183 

19,839 



960 

10 00 

980 



6,491 

440 

7.438 



137 

1,317 

83 

3,981 
36 



87 
80 
80 
88 
86 



6.069 
89.610 

660 
96.393 

636 



86 
83 
87 
00 
80 



4,809 
83,898 

674 
96,898 

600 



990 
10 36 

9 90 
10 60 

986 



1,866 
18,499 

387 
30,670 

346 



7,732 

683 

11,901 



3,963 
18,899 

847 
66,783 

864 



Winnebago 
Woodford. 



CSMTBAL DrFinON. 

Adams 

Brown 

Calhoun 

Cass 

Champaign 

Christian ........... 

Clark 

Coles 

Cumberland 

DeWiit 

Douglas 

Edgar 

Ford 

Fulton 

Greene 

Hancock 

Jersey 



849 

180 

6,689 

14 

1,376 

60 

2.047 

18 



19 



10 
1 

18 
80 

"i 

8 



76 
i66 



86 
80 
80 
36 
89 
36 
84 
20 



36 
86' 

86 

36 
36 

ao' 

86 

'86* 



6,336 

3,600 

169.170 

860 

89,904 

1.600 

49,138 

860 



476 

"ioo' 

"860' 
36 
460 
760 

"m 

800 

'l',966' 
8,636* 



80 
86 
72 
80 
73 
80 
70 
66 



80 

'so' 
w" 

80 
80 
80 

■75' 
80 



80 



4,980 

8,310 

I8I3O8 

880 

38.781 

1,300 

84.390 

334 



380 

"m 
"soo* 

30 
360 
600 

'**46' 
160 

1.680' 
3.i66' 



9 15 
8 15 

8 15 
950 

10 05 

9 10 
940 
956 



9 70 

'o'w 

*8'86' 
960 
7 75 
900 

'o'io' 

9 60 

o'm 



3,878 

1,069 

46.968 

183 
18.839 

546 
19.348 

178 



184 

"'ii' 
"is' 

9 
189 
870 

"*» 
76 

738 
1,084' 



3,702 

1,151 

76344 

147 

14,908 

664 

16,148 

63 



196 
•42" 

iia' 

11 
881 
330 



17 
84 



796 
1366' 



OF ILLINOIS. 



193 



Counties. 




Yield per acre 
in bushels. 


Total yield in 
bushels. 


Price per 
bushel. 


♦Value of crop, 
August 1. 1911. 


Cost of pro- 
duction per 
acre. 


Total cost of 
production. 


1 


i 


I/Mpan 


22 


26 


650 


10 80 


$ 440 


$960 


1 209 


$ 231 




Ifaoon. 




Maoom)tn 


2 


26 


60 


80 


40 


960 


19 


21 




Mason 




M o]Donouch 




















McLean .7. 


82 


26 


800 


80 


040 


11 05 


864 


286 








Montgomery 


22 


26 


660 


80 


440 


660 


146 


296 




Morgan 




Moultrie 


8 


26 


76* 


80 


60 


960 


28 


82 




Piatt. 




Pike 


16 

14 

2 


26" 

16 

10 


400 

210 

20 


80 
60 
80 


820 

126 

16 


960 

10 85 

960 


152 

145 

19 


168 




Sangamon 


10 


SohuylfflT 




8 


Soott 






Shelby 


6 

849 

47 


26 
26 
26 


160 
8.726 
1.175 


80 
80 
80 


120 

6.980 

940 


960 

11 85 

960 


67 

4,186 

446 


63 

2344 

494 




Taaewell 




Vermilion 




•OirrBXBN DIYXnON. 

Alexander ........... 




Bond 




















Clay 


8 


26 


75 


80 


00 


900 


27 


88 




Clinton 




Crawford 


1 


26 


25 


80 


20 


900 


9 


11 




Edwards 




Kflffngh^Tn , , 




















Fayette 


















••••^■•••e 


FriLnUin 




















Oi^llft^n .,,,.,,. 


1 
1 
1 

16 
22 


25 
18 
26 
25 
26 


25 

18 

25 

400 

660 


80 
90 
80 
80 
80 


20 

16 

20 

820 

440 


900 
900 
900 
900 
900 


9 

9 

9 

144 

198 


11 
7 

11 
176 
242 








RiLrdin.. 




Jackson 




Jaaper . ^ . . . . a 4 . ^ . . . » 




Jefiferson 




Johnson 




















Lawrence. ........... 


2 

121 

1 


25 
26 
25 


60 

8.025 

25 


80 
80 
80 


40 

2.420 
20 


900 

10 20 

900 


18 


82 

1.186 
11 


' 


Madison 




Marion 




Mnnnso, ^ ^ i * a ^ ^ ^ j ^ x * 




Monroe. 


8 
4 

1 


26 
26 
26 


75 

100 

25 


80 
80 
80 


00 
80 
20 


8 16 
786 
900 


24 
29 

9 


80 
61 
11 




Perry 




Pope 




P^ilaffki. x 




Randolph 


86 

1 


20 
26 


700 
25 


100 
80 


700 
20 


10 60 
900 


871 
9 


829 
11 




Richland 




Saline 




St. Clair 


467 

1 


26 
25 


"* 11.425' 
25 


80 
80 


9.140 
20 


900 
10 85 


4.118 
11 


5,027 
9 




Union 




Wi&bf^vh 






19 

14 

1 

97 


25 
26 
25 
25 


475 

850 

25 

2.426 


80 
80 
80 
80 


880 

280 

20 

1.940 


900 
900 
900 
860 


171 

126 

9 

824 


209 

154 

11 

1.116 




Wayne 




White 













*If the crop were sold at the prevailing price August 1, it would return this amount to tht 



WINTER AND SPRING WHEAT 



I Ufider cukivaiion in the United Statu, and tKt produdfon far 
a atria of yean. 



BUSHEL MEASURE. 





HIch. 


iDd. 


lU. 


Wta. 


lowh 


Mo. 


K.Y. 




S 

TO 

1 

SO 

i 

CO 

u 


G6 

1 

i 
1 

33 

to 

4S 

11 

U 

TO 

S 

88 


eo 

1 

i 
1 

1 

i 

i 

B8 


oo 

M 

i 

1 
1 

as 

1 

M 
G6 

Si 

34 


SO 

31 
53 

i 

i 

4S 

s 

i 
» 


SO 

ss 

i 

S3 

1 

St 

s 

i 

n 
i 














































































44 






















__. 



195 



HORSES AND MULES ON FARMS AND RANCHES. 

Number of animals^ and their value January i, 1912. 
(At estlmftted by the United States Department of Agriculture.) 



9TATBS AND TxBRITOMSS. 



Iklaine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

MaMaehuaetts 

Rhode Island 

Gonneetieut 

New York 

New Jeney 

Pennsylvania 

Ddaware 

Maryland 

Virgiaia 

West Vindnia. 

North Carolina 

South CaroUna 

Georfda~ 

Florida 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinoit 

Ifiehisan 

Wieoonmn 

Minneeota 

Iowa 

Ifiaeouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kanwas. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

MisasBppi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Oklahoma 

Arkanaas 

Montana 

Wvominc 

Ooiorado 

m 

New Mexico 

Arisona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Orneon 

Gahiomia 

The United States 

ToCsto-19n 

IMO 

1900. 

1908. 

1907. 

1906. 

190S. 

1901 

1908. 



HOESXS. 



Number. 



109,000 
46.000 
84.000 
64,000 
10.000 

47,000 
609.000 

91.000 
672.000 

34.000 

163,000 
340.000 
182,000 
173,000 
82.000 

124.000 

62.000 

901.000 

838,000 

1.497.000 

634,000 

652.000 

806.000 

1,568,000 

1.005,000 

601.000 

675.000 

1.059.000 

1.169.000 

443.000 

854,000 
143.000 
234,000 
187.000 
1.158.000 

750.000 
265.000 
347,000 
159.000 
321.000 

185,000 

104.000 

131.000 

72.000 

214.000 
293.000 
289.000 
493.000 



20,509.000 



Aversge 

price 
per head. 



$127.00 
126.00 
121.00 
144.00 
150.00 

131.00 
133.00 
143.00 
130.00 
108.00 

112.00 
109.00 
113.00 
126.00 
135.00 

132.00 
106.00 
126.00 
118.00 
115.00 

131.00 
124.00 
116.00 
113.00 
102.00 

114.00 
92.00 
91.00 
96.00 

107.00 

114.00 
99.00 
89.00 
79.00 
74.00 

76.00 
86.00 
87.00 
69.00 
80.00 

60.00 
69.00 
93.00 
77.00 

96.00 
107.00 
102.00 
117.00 



105.94 



Value. 



113.843,000 

5,796.000 

10,164,000 

9.216.000 

1,500.000 

6.157,000 
80,997.000 
13.013,000 
74.360.000 

3,672.000 

18,256,000 
37.060.000 
20.566.000 
21,798,000 
11,070,000 

16,368.000 

5.512,000 

113.526.000 

98.884,000 
172.155,000 

83,054.000 

80.848.000 

93,496,000 

177,184,000 

111.690.000 

78,774,000 
62,100,000 
96,369,000 
112,224,000 
47.401.000 

40.356.000 
14,157.000 
20,826,000 
14.773.000 
85.692.000 

57.000,000 
22.790,000 
30,189,000 
10.971,000 
25.680.000 

9.250,000 

7.176,000 

12.183.000 

5.544.000 

20,544.000 
31,351.000 
29,478.000 
57.681.000 



2.172.604.000 



MULBB. 



Number. 



4.000 

4.000 

44.000 

6.000 

23,000 

61,000 

12,000 

182,000 

166,000 

310,000 
25,000 
24,000 
84.000 

151,000 

4,000 

3.000 

6.000 

57,000 

333.000 

8.000 

13.000 

85,000 

218.000 

234.000 

279,000 
265,000 
277,000 
134,000 
703.000 

272.000 

228,000 

4.000 

2,000 

17,000 

15,000 
4,000 
2,000 
3,000 

4,000 
14.000 
10.000 
72.000 



4.362,000 



Average 

price 
per head. 



20,277.000 


111.46 


21.040.000 


108.19 


20.640.000 


96.64 


19.992.000 


93.41 


19.747,000 


03.51 


18,719.000 


80.72 


17.068.000 


70.87 


16.736.000 


97.93 


10.557,000 


62.25 



2,259,981.000 
2.276.363 000 
1.974.062.000 
1.867J»0.000 
1.846.578.000 
1.510.800.000 
1.200,310,000 
1.136,940,000 
1,080706,000 



1150.00 
160.00 
147.00 
133.00 

140.00 
126.00 
122.00 
144.00 
165.00 

158.00 
154.00 
127.00 
124.00 
123.00 

135.00 
125.00 
119.00 
119.00 
115.00 

127.00 
108.00 
106.00 
108.00 
118.00 

123.00 
127.00 
113.00 
116.00 
104.00 

98.00 

110.00 

91.00 

99.00 

100.00 

86.00 

118.00 

85.00 

82.00 

112.00 
112.00 
111.00 
136.00 



120.61 



Value. 



600,000 

640,000 

6.468.000 

798,000 

8.220.000 

7.686.000 

1.464.000 

26.208.000 

27.390.000 

48.980.000 

3.850.000 

3,048.000 

10.416.000 

18.573,000 

540.000 

375.000 

714.000 

6,783.000 

38.295.000 

1.016.000 

1.404.000 

9.010,000 

23,544,000 

27.612.000 

34.317,000 
33.655.000 
31.301,000 
15.544.000 
73.112.000 

26.656.000 

25.080.000 

364.000 

198.000 

1.700.000 

1.290,000 
472,000 
170.000 
246.000 

448.000 
1.568.000 
1,110.000 
9,792.000 



; 4.323,000 


126.92 


4,123.000 


119.84 


4.053.000 


107.84 


8.869.000 


107.76 


3.817.000 


112.16 


3,401,000 


98.31 


2,889.000 


87.18 


2.758,000 


78.88 


2.728.000 


72.49 



525,657,000 

544,850.000 
494.005.000 
437.062,000 
416.939.000 
428,064.000 
834.681.000 
251.840.000 
217.533.000 
197.763,000 



196 



CATTLE ON FARMS AND RANCHES. 

Number of animals, and their vahidj January 1, 1912. 
(As estimated by the United States Agricultural Department.) 



Statm AifD Tbbbroum. 



Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

MaMaohuaetts. . . 
Rhode Island. .. 



Conneoticut. . 
New York. . . 
New Jersey. . 
Pennsylvania, 
Delaware. ... 



Maryland 

VInSnia 

West A^rpnia. . 
North Gsiolina. 
South Carolina. 



Geoma. 
Florida. 
Ohio. . . . 
Indiana. 
Illinois. , 



MQohican., 
Wisconsin . 
Minnesota. 

Iowa 

Missouri. . . 



North Dakota. 
South Dakoto. 
Nebraska 



Kentucky. 



Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas. 



Oklahoma, 
Arkansas.. 
Montana. . 
Wyoming., 
Colorado. . 



New Mexico. 
Arisona. .. . 

Utah 

Nevada. .. . 



Idaho 

Wadiington. 

Oregon 

California... 



The United States. 



Totals— 1911. 
1910. 
1909.. 
1906.. 
1907.. 
1906.. 
1905.. 
1901. 
1903.. 



MiXiCB Cows. 



Number. 



155.000 

97.000 

268.000 

167.000 

28.000 

120.000 

1.495.000 

150.000 

948.000 

37.000 

168.000 
852.000 
280,000 
812.000 
185.000 

406.000 
123,000 
887.000 
684.000 
1.040,000 

806.000 
1.504.000 
1.107,000 
1,893.000 

822.000 

272.000 
866.000 
618.000 
698,000 
898,000 

886,000 
896.000 
443.000 
288,000 
1,034,000 

504.000 

404.000 

91,000 

85.000 

167,000 

53,000 
32.000 
88,000 
20.000 

94.000 
205,000 
180.000 
505,000 



20,699,000 



Avmge 

price 
per head. 



20,823,000 
21301.000 
21.720,000 
21,194.000 
20,968.000 
19,704.000 
17.572.000 
17.420,000 
17.106,000 



144.00 
44.00 
42.00 
60.00 
50.40 

49.20 
48.80 
58.20 
43.70 
87.00 

87.00 
81.40 
88.80 
28.00 
82.80 

28.00 
83.50 
42.00 
41.00 
45.50 

40.50 
40.40 
36.60 
40.80 
40.20 

87.00 
38.00 
40.60 
41.00 
85.80 

82.00 
26.00 
26.00 
29.50 
35.10 

85.40 
27.00 
49.40 
48.00 
47.00 

43.00 
51.00 
40.00 
50.00 

48.50 
54.00 
47.20 
63.00 



Value. 



Othbb Cattlm, 



Number. 



39.39 



6.820.000 
4.268.000 
11.256.000 
8.350.000 
1,159.000 

5.904.000 
64.784.000 

7.980.000 
41.209.000 

1.869,000 

6,216,000 
11.053.000 
7.774.000 
8.736.000 
5,976,000 

11,868.000 
4.120.000 
37,254.000 
25.994.000 
47.780.000 

32.643.000 
60,762.000 
40.616,000 
56.834,000 
88,044.000 

10.064.000 
18.908.000 
24.888,000 
28.618,000 
14.049.000 

12.820.000 
10.296.000 
11.518,000 
8.496.000 
86,298,000 

17,842,000 

10,908,000 

4.495.000 

1,680.000 

7,849,000 

2,279,000 
1.632.000 
3,320,000 
1,000,000 

4,559.000 
11.070,000 

8.406,000 
26,765,000 



815,414,000 



08,000 
65.000 
168.000 
80,000 
11.000 

71.000 
894.000 

68.000 
627.000 

19.000 

119.000 
478,000 
881,000 
880,000 
215,000 

667,000 
758,000 
885.000 
707.000 
1,266.000 

701.000 
1.146,000 
1,151,000 
2,773.000 
1.504.000 

446,000 

894.000 

2.002.000 

1.872.000 

561.000 

576,000 
540,000 
566,000 
516,000 
5,177,000 

1.242,000 
538,000 
782.000 
568.000 
921.000 

900.000 
741.000 
856,000 
429,000 

848.000 

186.000 

457.000 

1.515.000 



Average 

price 
per head. 



37.260,000 



45.42 
85.79 
82.30 
30.67 
81.00 
29.44 
27.44 
29.21 
30.21 



882,209,000 
78a806,000 
702,045.000 
65a067,000 
645,497,000 
582,789,000 
482,272,000 
506,841.000 
516,712,000 



39,679,000 
47.279,000 
40,370,000 
50,078,000 
51.566.000 
47.068.000 
43.669.000 
48.629.000 
44.659.000 



$10.80 
21.60 
18.20 
18.80 
20.00 

21.00 
10.80 
24.10 
21.70 
22.00 

21.40 
19.90 
22.10 
12.60 
13.20 

11.00 
18.10 
24.30 
24.50 
26.60 

18.80 
18.00 
15.30 
25.00 
25.80 

21.00 
22.20 
24.50 
26.40 
21.10 

14.70 
0.60 
10.00 
11.20 
17.00 

21.50 
11.40 
29.80 
28.80 
27.60 

28.40 
28.80 
21.60 
26.10 

25.50 
24.40 
25.80 
26.70 



21.20 



Value. 



1.940,000 
1,404.000 
8,058.000 
1.504.000 
220^000 

UOltOOO 
17.701.000 

1.689.000 

18.606.000 

418.000 

2.547.000 
9.512.000 
7,315.000 
4.788.000 
^838,000 

7.887.O0O 

9.930.000 

21.506.000 

17.322.000 

38,676,000 

13.179,000 
20,628,000 
17.6ia000 
69.325.000 
38,061.000 

9.866.000 
19,847.000 
49.049.000 
40.421.000 
11.837,000 

8.467.000 
6,184,000 
6.660.000 
6,779.000 
88^009.000 

96,703.000 
6.183.000 
21,814.000 
16,858,000 
26,420,000 

21.060.000 

17.966.000 

7.664,000 

11,197,000 

8.746.000 

4.588,000 

11.562.000 

40.450.000 



700^064,000 



20.54 
19.41 
17.49 
16.89 
17.10 
15.85 
15.16 
16.82 
18.46 



816.184.000 
O17.463L000 
863.75i000 
846.938.000 
881,567.000 
746.178.000 
661,671,000 
712.178.000 
884.065.000 



197 



SHEEP AND HOGS ON FARMS AND RANCHES. 

Nv/mber of animals, and their valuer January i, 191g. 
(Ab estimated by the Qnlted States Agricultural Department.) 



Statbs and TmaiTOBiBa 



Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vennont 

Massachosetts. . . 
Rhode Island. .. 



Connecticut. . . 
New York. . . . 
New Jersey. . . 
Pennsylvania. 
Delaware 



Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina. . . . 



• ••••• 



Georoa. 
Florida. 
Ohio.... 
Indiana. 
Illinois. 



Michigan . , 
Wisconsin. 
Minnesota. 

Iowa 

Missouri... 



North Dakota. 
South Dakota. 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

Kentucky. .. . 



Tennessee. 
Alabama. . 
Bfississippi. 
Louiedana.. 
Texas 



Oklahoma. 
Arkansas. . 
Montana. , 
Wyoming. , 
Colorado. . 



New Mexico , 
Ariaona. .. . 

Utah 

Nevada. .. . 



Idaho 

Washington. 

Oregon 

California.. . 



The United States. 



Totals— 1911. 
1910. 
1009.. 
1908.. 
1907.. 
1900.. 
190S.. 
1901. 
1908.. 



Shubp. 



Number. 



186.000 
48.000 

117.000 

35,000 

7,000 

21.000 
911,000 

30.000 

883.000 

8,000 

230.000 
781,000 
838,000 
193,000 
34.000 

174.000 

120.000 

3.694,000 

1.372,000 

1,068.000 

2,276.000 

847.000 

600.000 

1.201.000 

1.756,000 

287.000 
605.000 
382.000 
326.000 
1.820.000 

762.000 
140.000 
214,000 
176,000 
2,032.000 

72.000 

134.000 

6.011.000 

4.969.000 

1.579,000 

3.300,000 
1.510.000 
1.990,000 
1.444,000 

2.951,000 

486.000 

2,592,000 

2.656.000 



62.362.000 



Average 

price 
per head. 



14.10 
4.30 
4.30 
4.80 
4.60 

4.60 
4.40 
5.20 
4.30 
4.30 

4.40 
3.60 
3.90 
2.80 
2.80 

2.00 
2.10 
3.40 
4.20 
4.40 

3.60 
3.90 
3.60 
4.30 
3.80 

3.60 
3.30 
3.60 
3.80 
3.70 



Value. 



SwofB. 



Number. 



3 
2 
2 
2. 
2 



00 
20 
20 
00 
80 



3.30 
2.30 
3.30 
2.80 
3.00 

2.80 
4.30 
3.80 
3.80 

3.60 
3.50 
3.30 
8.60 



3.46 



763.000 
185.000 
503.000 
168.000 
32.000 

97.000 

4,008.000 

156.000 

8.797.000 

34.000 

1.012,000 

2,812.000 

3.268.000 

540.000 

95.000 

348.000 

252.000 

12.560.000 

5,762.000 

4.699.000 

8,194,000 
3.303.000 
2.160,000 
5.164,000 
6,669.000 

1.033.000 
1,996,000 
1,375.000 
1.239,000 
4.884,000 

2.286.000 
308,000 
471.000 
352,000 

6.690.000 

238.000 

308.000 

16,536,000 

13,913.000 

4,737.000 

9.240.000 
6.493,000 
7,562,000 
5.487.000 

10.624.000 
1.701.000 
8.554.000 
9.562,000 



181,170,000 



101.000 

63.000 

111,000 

117,000 

16,000 

60,000 

777,000 

165.000 

1,141.000 

59.000 

345.000 
880,000 
363,000 
1.405,000 
797,000 

2.098.000 
954.000 
3,578.000 
4.031.000 
4.640.000 

1.382.000 
2.051.000 
1.702,000 
9.689,000 
4.491.000 

359.000 
1.104.000 
4.267.000 
2.808,000 
1.724.000 

1.574.000 
1.533.000 
1.577.000 
1,642,000 
2.544,000 

1.410.000 
1.738.000 

143.000 
43.000 

211.000 

50.000 
22.000 
79,000 
30.000 

212.000 
246.000 
258.000 
830.000 



65,410.000 



Avenge 

price 
per head. 



$11.60 
10.50 
10.00 
11.30 
12.00 

11.60 
10.20 
11.30 
10.00 
7.20 

8.00 
6.30 
6.70 
7.40 
8.00 

6.70 
5.20 
8.20 
7.70 
8.80 

8.50 
9.60 
10.40 
9.80 
7.00 

10.50 
8.90 
8.80 
7.90 
5.40 

6.10 
6.50 
6.50 
6.80 
6.80 



.50 
.40 
.90 
8.60 
8.00 



5. 
5. 
9. 



8.20 
10.50 

9.00 
10.50 

8.00 
9.60 
8.50 
8.80 



8.00 



Value. 



53.633.000 


8.91 


57.216.000 


4.08 


56,064.000 


3.43 


54.631.000 


8.88 


53.240.000 


3.84 


50,632.000 


3.64 


45.170,000 


2.82 


61.630.000 


2.59 


63.965.000 


2.63 



209.585.000 
233.664.000 
192.632.000 
211,736,000 
204.210.000 
179.056.000 
127,332,000 
133,530,000 
168.316.000 



65,620.000 


9.37 


47,782.000 


9.14 


54,147,000 


6.55 


56.064,000 


6.05 


54,394.000 


7.62 


52.103,000 


6.18 


47,321.000 


6.99 


47.000.000 


6.15 


46.023.000 


7.78 



1.162.000 

556,000 

1,110.000 

1.322,000 

192.000 

096.000 

7.925.000 

1.864.000 

11.410.000 

425,000 

2,760.000 
5,544.000 
2.432.000 
10,397.000 
6.376.000 

14.057.000 
4.961,000 
29.340.000 
81.039,000 
40.832.000 

11,747,000 
19.690,000 
17.701.000 
94.952.000 
31.437,000 

8,no,ooo 

9.826.000 
87.550.000 
22.183.000 

9.310.000 

9.601,000 
9.964,000 

10.25a000 
9.524.000 

16,027,000 

7.755,000 
9.385.000 
1,416.000 
370.000 
1.688,000 

410.000 
231.000 
711,000 
315,000 

1,696,000 
2.337.000 
2,193,000 
6,889.000 



523.328.000 



615.170.000 
436.603.000 
354.794,000 
339,030,000 
417.791.000 
821.803,000 
283.255.000 
289.225.000 
864.974.000 



198 



TABLE SHOWING DATE OP 



Of each yar from Pu winter of 1896-97 to the winter of 1911-1912 at prcminmi 

lonjgiXudjt of 
(Collated from the United States Department 



Galveston 

New Orleans . . 

BavanuBh 

Ylcksburg 

Charleston 

Little Rock.... 

Memphis 

Nashville 

Cairo 

St. Ixmls 

Washington... 

Cincinnati 

Baltimore 

Denver 

Indianapolis... 
Springfield. Ill 
Phlladelpma.. 

Keokuk 

Pittsburg 

Omaha 

New York 

Cleveland 

Davenport 

Des Moines.... 

Toledo 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Dubuque 

Albany 

Buffalo 

Yankton 

Milwaukee . . . . 
Qrand Haven. 

Rochester 

Oswetro 

La Crosse 

St. Paul 

Alpena 

Marquette 

Bismarck 

Duluth 

Moor head 



n 



9 
S9 
38 
32 
82 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
38 
39 
39 
39 
39 
89 
89 
40 
40 
41 
40 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
42 
42 
42 
42 
43 
43 
43 
44 
43 
43 
44 
45 
46 
46 
46 
46 



.18 
.58 
.6 

.'47 

.46 

.9 

.10 

.0 

.88 

.64 

.6 

.18 

.46 

.46 

.48 

.67 

;38 
.16 
.43 
.30 
.30 
.35 
.40 
.62 
.20 
.30 
.39 
.53 
.54 
.2 
.5 
.8 
29 
.49 
.68 
.5 
.34 
.47 
.48 



•a 



94.47 

90.4 

81.5 

90.68 

79.66 

92.6 

90.3 

86.47 

89.10 

90.18 

77.2 

84.30 

76.87 

106.0 
86.10 
89.39 
75.9 
91.26 
70.2 
95.56 
74.0 
81.42 
40.88 
98.37 
83.84 
87.38 
88.3 
90.44 
73.45 
78.58 
97.28 
87.64 
86.18 
47.48 
76.86 
91.16 
93.3 
83.80 
87.24 

100.38 
92.6 
96.44 



WniTBR OF 



1896-97. 



Nov. 30 
Dec. 25 

- 3 
Nov. 9 
Dec. 8 
Oct. 18 
Nov. 6 

« 6 

• 8 
Oct. 21 

• 19 
■ 8 

Nov. 14 
Oct. 10 

• 3 

• 8 

• 9 



Deo. 4. 

• 6.. 

• 29.. 
Nov. 17.. 
Deo. 29.. 
Nov. 17.. 

• 17.. 
■ 17.. 
- 6.. 
' 6.. 

Oct. 31.. 

• 80.. 
" 81.. 

Oct. 16.. 
Sept. 21.. 
Cot. 29.. 



" 20 
■ 9 
Sept. 29 
Nov. 14 
Oct. 22 
• 7 
Sept 28 

Oct. 18 
Sept. 28 
Oct. 7 
- 10 
Not. 8 



Oct. 18 
Sept. 28 
Oct. 19 
" 10 
" 7 
Sept. 20 

Oct. 8 

Sept. 10 

■ 19 

• 19 



1897-96. 



I 31.. 

Nov. 7.. 

Oot. 29.. 

Nov. 18.. 

14.. 

Oct 29.. 

" 29 

28|Nov.l2.! 

• 8.. 
" 8.. 

Oct. 9.. 

80.. 

10.. 

9.. 

Nov. 6.. 

12.. 

Oct 10.. 

- 18.. 

■ 9.. 

• 9.. 
Sept.21.. 



u 
m 



Sept. 16.. 
Oot. 9.. 
8ept.l7.. 



1808-99. 



Deo. 10. 

« 18. 
Nov. 27. 

Oct 27. 
Nov. 27., 

Oct 22.. 

■ 27., 

■ 27.. 

2 2r.. 

• 27.. 

■ 28.. 

■ 4., 
« 27.. 

• 28.. 

• 28.. 

• 6.. 
Nov. 12.. 
Oot. 28., 

- 23. 

■ 14. 

• 27. 

■ 16.. 

• 27.. 

■ 16.. 

• 18.. 
" 28.. 
" 6.. 

■ 16.. 

- 27.. 
" 28.. 

• 29.. 

• 16.. 

■ 6.. 

• 6.. 

• 28.. 
Sept. 9.. 
Oot. 6.. 

• 6.. 



1899-00. 



1900-01. 



rt). . . . , 

Nov. 
Nov. 



Sept 

Oct 
Sept 
Nov. 
Oct. 

Sept. 

« 

Oct 

Sept 

Oct 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Oct 

Sept. 

■ 

m 
m 
m 

Oct. 

■ 

Sept. 
Oct. 



Sepi 



16. 

5.. 

8.. 

6.. 

3.. 

8.. 

4.. 
80.. 
80.. 

2.. 
80.. 

4.. 
16.. 
80.. 
28.. 

8.. 

1.. 
29.. 
18.. 

8.. 
30.. 
28.. 
80.. 
30.. 
80.. 
30.. 

3.. 

8.. 
26. . 
80.. 

1.. 

3.. 

8.. 
80: 
29.. 
28.. 
26. . 
19.. 
29.. 



(1) .. 


. J 


(1) ..'" 1 


SbV. 


9.. 


m 


12.. 


Dec. 


16.. 


Nov. 


9.. 


m 


8.. 


m 


9.. 


m 


9.. 


m 


9.. 


Oct 


20.. 


Nov. 


9.. 


a 


16.. 


Oct 


7.. 


Nov. 


6.. 


m 


8.. 


m 


16.. 


u 


8.. 


Oct. 


18.. 


■ 


17.. 


Nov. 15.. 1 


Oct 


20.. 


Nov. 


8.. 


Oct 


8.. 


Nov. 


6.. 


■ 


6.. 


« 


8.. 


Oct. 


8.. 


m 


20.. 


u 


20.. 


Sept 27.. 1 


Nov. 


6.. 


Oct 


17.. 


u 


20 . 


u 


20.. 


Nov. 


7.. 


Oct. 


8.. 


• 


17.. 


■ 


17.. 


Sept 26.. 1 


Nov. 


6.. 


Oct. 


16.. 



1901-02. 



X/OC. Id.. 

■ 15.. 
Nov. 17.. 

■ 16.. 

■ 16.. 

■ 16.. 

• 18.. 

■ 4.. 
« 4.. 

■ 4.. 
Oct 7.. 

- 18.. 
Nov.U.. 
Oct 13.. 

- 18.. 
Nov. 4.. 

■ 16.. 

- 3.. 
« 2 

Sept 18.. 
Nov.U.. 

■ 4.. 
Oot 4.. 

4.. 
4.. 
17.. 
18.. 
4.. 
20.. 
7.. 
Sept 18.. 
Oct 4.. 

- 20.. 

• 18.. 

• 28.. 

■ 4.. 

- 14.. 

- 4.. 
Oct 4.. 
Sept 18.. 
Oct 16.. 

16.. 



199 



THE FIRST KILLING FROST 

and indicative area centers ea$t cf the Bocky MounUxins; dUo the laUtiude and 

ttich eenterg' 

ot Agriculture, Weather Bureau.) 



WmrvR or 



190R-O3. 


1903-04. 


1904-06. 


1906^. 


1906-07. 


1907-06. 


1908-09. 


1909-10. 


1910-11. 


1911-12. 


Deo. 27.. 


Dec. '27.. 


(1) 


Dec* 6^!! 


Feb. 7/07 
None 


None 


None 


None 


Jan. 8 


(2) 

Nov. 13.. 


Dec 


16.. 


Jan.24/08 


None 


AV ^^mm^^ 

Deo. 21.. 


■ 8.. 


« 27.. 


Nov. 19.. 


u 


13.. 


- 4... 


Deo. 


22 


Noy.H'07 


Nov. 9.. 


Nov. 19.. 


Dec. 1.. 


" 25.. 


• d.. 


Oct 26.. 


Nov. 


13.. 


Nov. 30... 


Nov. 


13 


« 13.. 


- 12.. 


" 18.. 


Oct. 29.. 


• 18.. 


Nov. 28. . 


Nov. 19. 


Dec. 


13.. 


Dec. 11... 


« 


16 


• 14.. 


None 


Deo. 10.. 


Dec. 1.. 


" 26.. 


Dec. 5.. 


• 18.. 


Nov 


.13.. 


Nov. 30... 


m 


22 


« 12.. 


Nov. 12.. 


Nov. 18.. 


Oct. 29.. 


• 2.. 


Nov. 27.. 


Oct. 24.. 


■ 


13.. 


- 30... 


m 


13 


- 11. 


■ 12.. 


« 17.. 


- 29.. 


• 2.. 


Deo. 6.. 


« 26.. 


« 


14.. 


Oct. 22... 


Oct. 


11 


Oct. 29.. 


* 6.. 


Oct. 13.. 


■ 29.. 


• 2.. 


Nov. 27.. 


Nov. 7.. 


m 


13.. 


Nov. 11... 


« 


11 


- 28.. 


■ 6.. 


- 13.. 


• 28.. 


" 2.. 


« 28.. 


Oct. 24.. 


Oct. 


26.. 


Oct. 12... 


« 


11 


- 28.. 


■ 6.. 


* 12.. 


■ 28. 


" 2.. 


Cot. 22.. 


- 28.. 


M 


7.. 


- 22... 


« 


12 


■ 22.. 


■ 1.. 


- 20.. 


- 80.. 


8.. 


Nov. 28.. 


- 24.. 


■ 


28.. 


■ 22... 


m 


11 


« 19.. 


Oct. 81.. 


- 13.. 


■ 28.. 


Oct. 24.. 


Oct. 30.. 


Nov. 7.. 


M 


28.. 


Nov. 10. . . 


Nov. 


9 


■ 22.. 


Nov. 2.. 


Nov. 19.. 


■ 30.. 


Nov. 3.. 


Sept. 12.. 


Sept. 15.. 


■ 


19.. 


■ 10... 


Oct. 


19 


Oct. 26.. 


Sept.27.. 


Oct. 9.. 


■ 20.. 


Oct. 20.. 


Nov. 23.. 


Oct. 24.. 


« 


23.. 


• 26... 


u 


11 


■ 21.. 


Oct. 13.. 


• 18.. 


- 28.. 


« 24.. 


- 23.. 


« 24.. 


■ 


26.. 


- 12... 


m 


10 


■ 19.. 


■ 31.. 


- 12.. 


" 29.. 


Nov. 1 . . 


« 29.. 


Nov. 7.. 


m 


28.. 


Nov. 3... 


m 


13 


Nov. 13.. 


Nov. 2.. 


Nov. 18.. 


" 80.. 


Oct. 29.. 


Oct. 14.. 


Oct. 24.. 


u 


23 


Oct. 12... 


m 


10 


Oct. 13.. 


Sept.28.. 


Oct. 12.. 


- 22.. 


■ 22.. 


Nov. 9.. 


■ 26.. 


m 


7.. 


" 22... 


u 


12 


- 16.. 


Oct. 13.. 


- 19.. 


• 29.. 


« 29.. 


Obt. 28.. 


Nov. 6.. 


u 


28.. 


• 21... 


u 


10 


" 12.. 


* 29.. 


• 12.. 


• 28.. 


« 23 


Nov. 29.. 


■ 7.. 


« 


31.. 


Nov. 2a.. 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 12.. 


Nov. 6. 


Nov. 18.. 


- 30.. 


Nov. 3.. 


• 28.. 


" 8.. 


■ 


24... 


Oct. 28... 


« 


2 


Oct. 19.. 


« 2.. 


• 24.. 


Nov. 7.. 


• 2.. 


Oct. 28.. 


Oct. ns.. 


« 


19.. 


■ 12... 


Oct. 


10 


Sept. 26.. 


Sept.29.. 
*^ 28.. 


Oct. 13.. 


Oct. 29.. 


Oct. 27.. 


• 14.. 


I 18.. 


M 


23.. 


" 12... 


M 


10 


Oct. 12.. 


- 12.. 


« 22.. 


" 22 


- 29.. 


M^K ■ • 


« 


27.. 


■ 21... 


• 


11 


- 19.. 


Oct. 2.. 


■ 13.. 


- 29.. 


■ 84 . 


Nov. 23.. 


; 27.. 


■ 


28.. 


- 21... 


« 


10 


- 15.. 


« 12.. 


• 14.. 


" 29.. 


■ 24. 


Oct.;21.. 


w4 • • 


m 


7.. 


- 25... 


■ 


11 


« 14.. 


■ 9.. 


- 14.. 


" 28.. 


mm^ m m 

" 28 


« 14.. 


" 24.. 


m 


27.. 


■ 21... 


• 


10 


* 13.. 


Sept.29.. 


- 12.. 


- 29.. 


" 24 


- 10.. 


■ 25.. 


Sept.23.. 


" 25... 


■ 


12 


" 9.. 


Oct. 13.. 


■ 13.. 


" 18.. 


" 8 


" 29.. 


" 28.. 


Oct. 


7.. 


• 23... 


« 


10 


- 21.. 


- 31.. 


■ 20.. 


" 29.. 


* 28 


Sept. 18.. 


Nov. 5.. 


u 


23.. 


■ 11... 


« 


9 


■ 12.. 


Sept.29.. 


« 12.. 


« 21.. 


" 20 


Oct. 14.. 


Oct. 18.. 


u 


22a; 


" 28... 


• 


10 


■ 14.. 


Oct. 80.. 


- 14.. 


" 28.. 


* 24 


- 21.. 


■ 10.. 


m 


• • ■ ■ 


■ 25... 


■ 


11 


« 14. 


- 9.. 


« 19.. 


" 28.. 


" 27 


« 10.. 


- 25.. 


w 


7.. 


" 26... 


■ 


13 


■ 21.. 


Oct 13.. 


• 19.. 


" 13.. 


* 88 


" 17.. 


■ 27.. 


« 


31. 


* 26. . . 


« 


31 


- 26.. 


" 18.. 


" 29.. 


" 13.. 


" 28 


" 14.. 


" 14.. 


u 


6.. 


■ 21... 


M 


10 


" 8. 


Sept.29.. 
^ 29.. 


- 14.. 


* 22.. 


* 24 


■ 6.. 


• 6.. 


« 


6.. 


- 16... 


M 


10 


Sept.30.. 


• 12.. 


" 22.. 


" 22 


■ 10.. 


Sept.29.. 
^ 10.. 


Sept. 22.. 


" 25... 


M 


10 


Oct. 1 . 


Oct. 3.. 


" 4.. 


* 7.. 


M0. • 

* 8 


" 21.. 


Oct. 


23.. 


- 17... 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 8.. 


■ 2.. 


" 15.. 


• 27.. 


- 84.. 
■ 20.. 


Sept. 12.. 


Sept. 14.. 


Sept. 11.. 


« 11... 


« 


9 


Sept.22.. 
•^ 25.. 


Sept.27.. 


Sept. 24.. 


Sept. 9.. 


Oct. 14.. 


- 27.. 


Oct, 


6.. 


« 11... 


■ 


6 


Oct. 12.. 


Oct. 6.. 


" 22 


- 3.. 


• 18. 


m 


• . 


« 11... 


« 


10 


- 27.. 


• 29. " 12.. 


Sept. 12.. 


« 20.. 



(1) None reported. 



(2) No kiillng froBt occurred up to Dec. Slst. 



201 



O 

o 

> 



B 



8 

00 

o 

-*» 

OQ 

^-« 

I 

o 



I 



>*1 

T 

I 



o 



43 

Pi 
00 



P 
<1 












a 









s 



00 74 lO iO '^ «0 00 <^*^ 

a> ^ M 00 e« M 1-1 



«9iO'«0000»S 00 



» * » » * » * A» 






So^oSSmwoS S 
M^coeooeooo of 



^C0l»0000O« 00^ 

■4<i-ie«eor>eooo of 

*^ CO 



^ n K«> CO 04 00 oo ^*^ 

» i «> * » ih * jk ^m 

O*4*H«-iMaco40 M 






SS3S«i4«De« ScS 
1-•eoe4C4^-a»H» i-i 



i 



«Hmao<D»40C oetD 



iM iO eo m Q ^ce i^ 






oooC ^^041^ 



p2 






« 00 



J 



a 



i 



•Sl'go'O 

s 






•I. 



202 



FOREIGN WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

{Vnmlahed by the Board's special foreign correspondent, Mr. George J. B. Broomball, Fellow 

of the Royal Stat istical Society). 

UNITED KINGDOM. 

Id the United Kingdom the quarter comprises among others the following conTentlOBal 
weights:— 

Lbs. 
Wheat and Ck>m from the Atlantic and Qolf ports of America, from Argentina, 

Australia and New Zealand 4S0 

American and Oanadian Oats 300 

Wheat from Pacific coast of U. 8. A fiOO 

Californian Barley 448 

Russian W heat from Black Sea and Azoff , always 492 

Russian Wheat from Baltic 496 

^Russian Oom from Black Sea 498 

Russian Barley from Black Sea and Azoff 400 

Russian Oats 804 and 320 

Russian Rye 480 

Danublan Wheat 480 

Danublan Corn— large berry 480 

Danubian Corn— small berry 498 

Danubian Barley 400 

DanubianRye 480 

German Wheat— from Dantsio, 500 lbs. ; all others 604 

Chilian Barley 448 

ChUIan Wheat 500 

New Zealand Oats Cif. 820 lbs.; on Mark Lane 384 

Argentine Oats 304 

Linseed, American 484 

Linseed, Russian 424 

Linseed, Argentine 416 

Linseed, Bombay 416 

Linseed, Calcutta 410 

*If shipped from Poti 480 lbs. 

ENGLAND. 

The term bushel, used colloquially, varies greatly according to locality, from 38 lbs. to 160 lbs. 

The Board of Agriculture reckons a bushel of wheat as equal to 00 lbs., of barley equal to 

60 lbs., of oats equal to 39 lbs. 
A sack or comb usually represents 4 bushels. 
A sack of flour contains 880 lbs. 

SCOTLAND AND IRELAND. 

A boll or bole is equal to 4 Winchester bushels. In Glasgow a boll represents 840 lbs. of wheat. 

880 lbs. com and peas, 380 lbs. barley, 864 lbs. oats. 
A Wey is equal to 5 quarters, a Last to 10 quarters. 

Some of the principal weights and measures in use in the grain trade of other eonntries 
are:— 

THE METRIC SYSTEM. 

WaiOHTS.— A kilogramme (or kilo) Is equal to 2 lbs. 3 oz. or 24S046 lbs. 

A quintal (100 kilos) is equal to 220.4688 lbs. avoirdupois. 

A French tonne (10 quintals or 1000 kilosHs equal to 8204.688 lbs. aToirdnpois. 
Drt Mbasubs.— a hectoliter is equal to 2.837 wincnester bushels; 2.7496 Imperial bushels. 
SUBrAOB MxASURB.— A hectare is equal to 2.47106 English statute acres. 
Long Mbasube.— A meter is equal to 1 yard, 3.37011 inches. 

A kilometer is equal to 1,093 yards, 1 foot, 10.11 inches. 

RUSSIA. 

A pood is equal to 36.112 lbs. avoirdupois. 

A ichetvert is equal to 5.77 Imperial bushels or 5.96 Winchester bushels. 

A dessiatine is equal to 2.6997 acres. 

A verst is equal to 0.663 of an Bngllsh mile. 



203 



FOREIGN WEIGHTS AND MEASURES— Continued. 

AUSTEIA-HUNGARY. 
A joch Is equal to 1.423 acres. A double centner is equal to a quintal 230.46 lbs. 

DENMARK. 

A TOnde (drjgoods) is equal to 8.826 Imperial bushels or 3.M783 Winchester bushels. 
A Pnnd is Mual to 1.102 lbs. avoirdupois. 
A TOndeland is equal to 1.86 acres. 

GREECE. 

An ooque is equal to 2.84 lbs. avoirdupois. A quintal is equal to 123.8 lbs. avoirdupois. 

EGYPT. 

A oommerclal oke at Alexandria is equal to 2.75186 lbs. avoirdupois. 
A cantar is equal to 90.06 lbs. avoirdupois. 

In Cairo an ardeb of wheat, barley or com is equal to 4.02 Imperial bushels or 5.07375 
Winchester bushels. 

CHINA. 
A catty is equal to 1.33 lbs. avoirdupois. A pioul is equal to 13SH lbs, avoirdupois. 

JAPAN. 

A cho is equal to 2.4607 acres. 

A koku is equal to 5.1164 Winchester bushels or 4.9628 Imperial bushels. 

A kwan-me is equal to 8.2673 lbs. avoirdupois. 



UNITED STATES TARIFF DUTIES. 

The tariff duUea upon cerecUa and farm products and average ad valorem rote, 
(iuty computed on the imporU during the year ended June SO^ 1911. 



Wheat flour 

Wheat 

Com 

Oats 

Bye 

Barley 

Barleymalt 

Buok wheat 

Beans 

Peas, dried, per bushel 

Peas, split, per 00 lbs 

Foiaioes, per bushel, 60 lbs. 

Plax teed or Linseed, 66 lbs 

Bice, cleaned, per lb 

Hops, per lb 

Butter and substitutes, per lb 

CheiMe and substitutes for, per lb 

■ns,p«r dos 

by.perton 



Tariff 
rates. 



25 per eent. 
25 cents per bu. 
15 • • • 
15 " 
10 • 
80 " 
45 • 
15 • 
45 ■ 



45 

25 

25 

2 

16 

6 

6 

5 



lb. 



dOSa 

14 per ton. 



Average 
Per cent, 
ad val- 
orem. 



24.85 
20.78 
88.86 
18.57 
56.66 
88.99 
26.55 
86.68 
17.10 
34.89 
28.28 
12.87 
61.67 
50.60 
83.75 
84.30 
86.55 
58.90 



FOREIGN IMPORT DUTIES ON GRAIN AlfD FLOUR. 

Statement showiitg the rates of Avty leviahU on gram and JUnir in various countriee, accord- 
ing to the ialett information nvaiiable at the Commercial InUlUgenee BTaneh of the 
Board of 3Vade, London, £ingland- Correeted up to January 31, 1911. 



JS2| 5 I 

o £ >- I 

■^ s e s -s 

£■•358 £ 

a s s s ■§ 












1 lliti^...,,^.,. 






S £& 
\ III 









i i 






!l 



I 11 

i ft 



■^=T S 

1111.1 

lillfi 

". a si 
s &:j 

a ill 



206 



ENGLISH PRICES OF MONEY. ETC., COTTON AND 
WHEAT (WITH FAEMEES' DELIVERIES), 

During the Koavn of 1910-1911. 



Week, BeesoD. 



i. 



It 1-10 79K' 



U IJ-K 
M S-l< 



U Ml 
H 7-lt 



79 16-!e 

78 II-IS 
78 1(-18 



206 
BRITISH WHEAT AND CORN 

Shamng fyrioe$ of cargoes ^^ off coast ^^ and ''to arrive" also loeekly imporU into 

according to BroomhaiVs Com Trade 

(B'umlshed by the Board's special foreign correspondent, Mr. 



1911. 



Juowy... 

Manh 

ApriL 

May..!'.!! 

Jnne 

July...!!!! 

August.... 
S^tamber 
Oatobor.'.V 

Nowmbar. 
Daaaoftbar. 



2 

9 
16 
23 
80 

6 
18 
20 
27 

6 
13 
20 
27 

8 
10 
17 
24 

1 

8 
16 
22 
29 

5 
12 
19 
20 

8 
10 
17 
24 
81 

7 
14 
21 
28 

4 
11 
18 
25 

2 

9 
16 
23 
30 

6 
18 
20 
27 

4 
11 
18 
25 



Cabooss 
Atloat. 



Walla WaOa. 
Per quarter. 



a. 
86 



86 
86 

■ ■ • • 

86 

B • • • 

84 



84 
83 
88 



85 
86 







8 





IH 

8 

6 



85 



86 
86 
86 
35 
86 
86 



4H 

6 

6 

9 

8 

9 



To Abbio, SBmora. 



Auetralian. 
Per quarter. 



a. 
36 
86 
36 
85 
85 
85 
84 
84 
33 
83 
83 
83 
83 
83 
33 
33 
34 
34 
86 
36 
34 
34 
34 
33 
33 
33 
33 
34 
83 
33 
34 
34 
36 
36 
85 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
86 
86 
87 
86 
85 
36 
86 
86 
36 
86 
86 
86 



d. 

3 





9 

9 







S« 

8 

J« 

6 
8 
6 
3 
6 
8 
8 
6 
9 
8 
6 
6 
9 
9 

IH 

6 

9 

IH 

9 

6 





9 

9 





4H 

6 





9 

9 

9 

6 

6 



i« 

3 



No. 2 Northem 
Wheat, peroeli, 

Per quarter. 

toLradoB. 



a. 
36 
86 
36 
36 
86 
36 
36 
85 
85 
84 
34 
34 
34 
88 
33 
88 
34 
34 
36 
35 
84 
84 
85 
84 
34 
84 
35 
35 
34 
85 
85 

No. 3 86 

No. 3 36 

No. 8 86 

No. 8 

No. 8 

No. 8 

No. 3 

No. 8 

No. 8 

No. 3 

No. 8 

No. 8 

No. 8 

No. 8 

No. 8 

No. 3 

No. 3 

No. 2 

No. 2 

No. 2 

No. 2 



36 
87 
87 
37 
36 
86 
86 
86 
87 
86 
86 
86 
86 
36 
86 
36 
87 
87 



7) 


7H 

6 

9 

6 

8 

6 







IH 



8 

7H 

6 

9 

6 

9 

IH 



9 

3 

9 



1 

9 
6 
9 
3 

4H 

6 

8 

¥ 

9 
9 
8 





207 
PRICES AND SUPPLY STATISTICS 

UnUed Kingdom aooording to Custom Hovae re^mst and quantitMi '*<m paMay«'* 
George J. 8. BTOomhall, Fellow of the Royal Btatletlcal Society.) 



OB SUIFPJID. 




On PAflBAON TO 


On Pabbaon to 




UmnD Kingdom. 


UnTTBD EZNaDOM. 


Conhnnnt. 


American mixed 
















Mmise, puodi 


floor. 


Wheat 


Conu 


Wheat 


Com. 


Wheat 


Com. 


per quarter. 


brlfl. 


M. qrs. 


M.qx8. 


and Flour. 


M.qn. 


and Flour. 


M. qrk 


toIiTefpool. 


* 






M. qrs. 




M. qrk 




8. <L 
19 9 


89 


311 


185 


1.733 


809 


2.079 


1,482 


20 9 


69 


420 


216 


1,536 


782 


2.133 


1.628 


20 IH 


127 


222 


827 


1,614 


695 


2.247 


1.445 


20 


79 


273 


191 


1.696 


725 


2.489 


1.442 


19 lOH 


71 


374 


251 


1,872 


615 


2.663 


1.230 


19 7H 


76 


829 


246 


2.058 


538 


2.687 


1.171 


19 7H 


87 


368 


297 


2.195 


454 


2,951 


1.061 


19 6 


114 


803 


297 


2.246 


488 


3.140 


731 


18 lOH 


74 


222 


131 


2.598 


486 


3.451 


709 


19 8 


109 


379 


204 


2,686 


503 


3.511 


740 


19 7H 


84 


433 


166 


2,831 


524 


3.572 


666 


19 7U 


117 


361 


204 


3.011 


492 


3.789 


667 


19 IH 


61 


397 


197 


3.143 


417 


3.987 


881 


19 8 


96 


470 


193 


3.136 


850 


4,121 


747 


20 6 


86 


611 


119 


3.046 


364 


4,327 


634 


20 re 


129 


419 


140 


3.075 


321 


4,3n 


663 


22 |0 


123 


441 


116 


3.003 


239 


4.079 


522 


21 ,7^ 
21 7>| 


96 


409 


110 


2.917 


220 


3.949 


450 


104 


330 


71 


2.769 


297 


3,941 


509 


21 6 


76 


437 


24 


2,923 


428 


8,914 


595 


21 6 


118 


471 


115 


2.964 


459 


4.358 


642 


21 im 


140 


428 


146 


3,111 


474 


3.968 


643 


22 |4H 


104 


549 


243 


3,210 


553 


4.149 


604 


22 6 


121 


407 


157 


3,363 


734 


3.673 


773 


22 


119 


607 


184 


3,145 


715 


8.145 


769 


22 4H 


114 


388 


305 


3.181 


698 


2,707 


858 


23 9 


89 


513 


239 


3,018 


676 


2.696 


706 


24 7H 


104 


868 


265 


3,087 


678 


2,892 


607 


26 IH 


112 


764 


888 


2.811 


568 


2.045 


806 


26 4Vl 


96 


582 


825 


2,751 


410 


1.857 


777 


26 7H 


80 


484 


173 


2,849 


429 


1.706 


705 


26 lOVi 


79 


511 


209 


8.011 


603 


1.685 


589 


26 6 


147 


448 


187 


2,813 


541 


1,659 


673 


20 8 


54 


848 


66 


2.648 


581 


2.040 


698 


26 9 


100 


440 


385 


2.746 


438 


2.066 


463 


27 lOH 


166 


682 


312 


2,476 


305 


1.903 


412 


28 


169 


718 


117 


2,102 


291 


2.026 


409 


28 3 


127 


388 


114 


2.048 


226 


2,059 


421 


27 7H 


71 


345 


96 


2,189 


212 


2,015 


514 


28 8 


186 


472 


134 


2.229 


181 


1,678 


450 


29 m 


264 


342 


99 


2.366 


204 


1.642 


483 


29 4H 


119 


462 


94 


2.817 


230 


1.231 


338 


80 IH 


169 


327 


111 


2.449 


181 


1.178 


285 


80 


146 


342 


105 


2.610 


212 


1.284 


317 


26 


127 


393 


59 


2,847 


264 


1.491 


218 


26 9 


117 


611 


80 


2.857 


256 


1.418 


168 


26 6 


189 


661 


184 


2,697 


279 


1.121 


256 


26 lOH 


129 


801 


61 


2.775 


819 


1,287 


863 


26 lOH 


n 


542 


92 


2.764 


339 


1,871 


362 


26 lOH 


120 


445 


183 


2.642 


340 


1.287 


896 


26 iH 


127 


605 


104 


2,404 


374 


1.233 


599 


26 8 


91 


514 


123 


2.240 


899 


1.421 


789 



*Nois: Supply Statiatios: 000 omitted in every ease in the last seyen columns. 



208 



LIVERPOOL GRAIN, FLOUE 

WaMy range of prieet in the City of Lmerpool 
(Fomlibed Lby the Board's specl&l torelgii correapoodsiit 



tNo.lM 
nio-tU 



Vud i^ 



7 m 






T SMi7 S 



T 97 9 

10 3tio>, 



7 »M 



7 SHOT ID 






bhSs 



G TH9( 1 
G 10 I t II 



s imS« iif 



209 



AND PROVISION MARKETS. 

for orairiy flour and provisuma during 1911, 

Mr. George J. S. Broomball, Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society.) 



FlX>1TB. 






PBOvisioirs. 








American 
first spring 

patents, 
per 280 lbs. 


American 
winter 
patents, 

per 280 lbs. 


Liverpool 

first patents 

perj»01bs. 


Short clear 

backs, 
per 112 lbs. 


Cumberland 
cut bacon, 
per 112 lbs. 


American cut 

hams, 

per 112 lbs. 


Lard, 

381 


pails. 


7S. d. 


a. d. 


8. d. 


fl. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


s. d. 


R. d. 


s.d. 


8. d. 


8.d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


196fi 


Ml 6 


2803 


800 


276^ 


^286 


586@ 


^630 


59 


^62 


630^ 


67 


55 8 


^56 9 


396ti 


Ml 


286$ 


80 6 


276( 


1286 


600| 


^640 


61 3 64 1 


630 i 


680 


550| 


» 56 9 


3962 


Ml 


286i 


306 


270( 


1286 


6066 


^640 


6200 


\ 640 


6403 


680 


53 oi 


\ 55 6 


206^ 


^306 


28 6i 


296 


270( 


|280 


57 6 ^ 


^63 6 


610^ 


^640 


62 3 


66 6 


52 6 i 


f 53 6 


300 j 


^800 


280i 


\ 290 


27 0( 


|280 


57 0| 


\ 630 


610 6 


^630 


606^ 
580§ 


666 


52 6 @ 54 


200 I 


^800 


28 Oi 


1286 


27 0( 


1 280 


55 6i 


1 61 


6066 


\ 630 


630 


509 @ 


\ 536 


2804 


^206 


270i 


i286 


27 0( 


E280 


546 i 


\ 600 


59 6 


\ 02 


560@ 


61 


49 8 1 


\ 51 


380^ 


^290 


27 oi 


1280 


270( 


E280 


54 6| 


^50 


58 6 a 


\ 62 


5503 


590 


489 i 


\ 500 


276ti 


^280 


260^ 
260d 


^276 


27 0( 


|280 


55 6| 


^50 


58 66 


\ 630 


550S 


59 


47 9 1 


^40 8 


376^ 


>280 


^270 


270 i 


|280 


550S 


^59 


59 6 


\ 630 


55 3 


59 


480 i 


^49 6 


276€ 


\ 286 


260® 27 6 


26 6 ( 


1 280 


54 6l 


M8 6 


5806 


\ 630 


5463 


59 


46 9 i 


\ 48 9 


3764 


\ 286 


266^ 


27 6 


26 6 ( 


|280 


52 6 i 


M7 


57 6 


^630 


540i 


59 


46 oi 


^47 9 


270ti 


^280 


260i 


1 27 


26 ( 


|280 


510 1 


^560 


540 i 


^61 


52 3 


590 


449 1 


^46 6 


26 6 1 


\ 276 


2660 


^266 


260( 


1 280 


500| 


^550 


52 oi 


^580 


510 3 


57 


42 6i 


\ 44 6 


260^ 


^270 


250i 


f 260 


26 ( 


|280 


490ti 


\ 53 


52 0| 


^560 


51 3 


57 


420| 


^436 


360^ 


M7 8 


250i 


1270 


26 0< 


|28 6 


49 oi 


\ 530 


52 6 


M7 


51 6 3 


580 


41 9 1 


148 9 


26 6 i 


276 


260i 


127 


260< 


|286 


48 0^ 


M3 6 


52 0| 


M7 


52 6 @ 


^580 


42 9 i 


^446 


266^ 


280 


26 ti 


^276 


260( 


|286 


4864 


\ 53 6 


51 a 


M7 


52 6 3 


^50 


42 6 i 


^440 


370^ 


286 


26 6 ti 


\ 280 


260 ( 


|286 


48 6 a 


M3 6 


49 6 


\ 56 


52 6 3 


\ 60 6 


42 6 i 


\ 44 


376i 


286 


26 6 i 


^280 


26 < 


|286 


47 6 6 
46 6 i 


^53 6 


47 6 


^53 


5403 


\ 620 


42 8 6 


^440 


37 6 j 


286 


26 1 


\ 27 6 


256( 


|280 


M2 6 


46 6 


M2 


55 6 3 


) 640 


42 8 6 


^439 


376( 


286 


26 6S 


^27 6 


26 6 { 


|280 


486ti 


^540 


47 6 6 


^540 


59 oi 


\ 680 


41 6 6 


^43 9 


37 6 ( 


286 


26 6 1 


^276 


25 6 < 


|280 


49 2 


^540 


49 6 6 


^550 


62 6 3 


\ 74 


42 i 


^443 


370i 


280 


260 i 


^270 


250 ( 


^270 


49 0| 


»540 


51 0| 


\ 550 


680 3 


\n 


42 0| 


^436 


270 j 


280 


260 1 


^270 


250 ( 


1 270 


49 0| 


^540 


51 6 fi 


^550 


70 3 


\ 77 


41 9 1 


^430 


370< 


280 


26 6 i 


^276 


250 < 


|270 


4806 


^540 


52 1 


^550 


67 1 


\ 74 


420 i 


f 438 


370( 


286 


26 6 i 


^276 


260( 


|27 6 


480 6 


^53 6 


520 ^ 


M7 


670| 


^73 


42 0| 


^48 6 


370( 


286 


26 6^ 


^276 


25 64 


|276 


48 66 


^540 


540| 


^586 


690 1 


f 73 6 


428| 


\ 43 6 


370( 


286 


260 1 


^276 


25 6 ( 


|27 6 


486 6 


^540 


550 1 


^586 


Tool 


\ 73 6 


41 9 1 


^42 6 


370( 


286 


260i 


^270 


2564 


|276 


4806 


^540 


550 6 


M8 


70 6 i 


^75 6 


41 9 1 


»443 


370( 


286 


260| 


^270 


260( 


128 


4866 


^540 


540 6 


^580 


72 0| 


\ 76 


42 9^ 


^459 


376< 


286 


26 6 i 


^27 6 


26 6 ( 


|280 


49 6 


^550 


540 6 


^580 


720 1 


^75 


453| 


^469 


380< 


296 


266| 


1276 


27 ( 


i280 


5006 


^550 


5406 


M7 


7S0i 


^75 


46 6 1 


147 9 


38 6< 


29 6 


26 6i 


^276 


270( 


1280 


62 6 


M7 


590l 


^640 


75 1 


^790 


47 oi 


^49 6 


390 ( 


800 


270| 


^276 


270( 


1280 


530^ 


M7 


6006 


^640 


730 1 


^790 


48 8 1 


^509 


3061 


806 


270 1 


^280 


270 ( 


|280 


5306 


^580 


580^ 


^630 


680 g 


^76 


49 9 1 


Ml 3 


306< 


806 


276 1 


^280 


276 ( 


1286 


5306 


>580 


57 6 


\ 62 


630 i 


^72 


49 3 1 


\ 51 


306( 


806 


27 6 1 


^280 


2804 


1290 


510 6 


M7 


550 6 


(600 


59 0| 


\ 660 


48 9 1 


»500 


800( 


810 


276i 


^280 


2804 


1290 


5006 


^560 


5406 


^600 


57 1 


\ 63 


47 6 1 


^50 6 


800< 


310 


276^ 


1280 


2804 


|290 


49 6 


^550 


530 6 


M9 


540| 


^600 


46 8 i 


^480 


800( 


31 


2761 


^280 


2804 


1 290 


49 6 


^530 


5406 


^580 


540 1 


^580 


460 6 


^47 9 


30 t{ 


820 


276^ 


^280 


2804 


|290 


51 Oti 


^560 


5506 


M9 


560| 


\ 590 


460 6 


^488 


81 0( 


820 


276 ^ 


^286 


2804 


|290 


51 6 6 


M8 


5406 


M9 


540i 


1690 


460i 


\ 48 9 


306( 


820 


2804 


^286 


27 6 4 


|290 


51 0| 


M6 


530i 


\ 59 


530| 


^57 


460i 


1488 


306< 


81 6 


280 ti 


^28 6 


27 4 


1286 


5006 


M6 


52 6 6 


^580 


530| 


\ 600 


47 3 1 


^49 8 


306 


81 6 


280i 


1286 


2704 


|280 


500| 


^55:0 


52 6 


\ 57 


5561 


^61 


480| 


(493 


806 


81 6 


280i 


1286 


2664 


|276 


49 6 


^550 


5006 


\ 56 


5462 


^610 


47 9 1 


(40 8 


:39 6 


31 6 


280i 


1286 


26 6 4 


|276 


4866 


^540 


46 6 


^540 


530 i 


^600 


47 6 6 


^486 


300 


806 


27 6 i 


»286 


2604 


|270 


4866 


^53 6 


4606 


^500 


530 i 


M9 


46 6 


^480 


!38 6 


29 6 


270| 


f276 


2604 


1270 


4806 


^530 


4506 


M9 


52 6 1 


^580 


46 6 


M7 6 


[38 6 


296 


270| 


^276 


2604 


|270 


47 6 


MIO 


47 6 


MIO 


52 0| 


M7 


46 9 6 


M7 9 


38:6 4 


396 


276| 


^280 


2604 


|270 


47 j 


^50^0 


440 J 


^500 


530| 


M7 6 


46 9 J 


M7 9 



ESTIMATED STOCKS OF GEAIN, ETC., IN MER- 
CHANTS' HANDS IN LIVBBPOOL 



As declared monthly during 1911, by the Liverpool Com Trade 



IWl. 


Wheat. 


sa 


c?;Sk 


Beans. 


Peas. 

Centals. 


Indian 

Centais 


OatmeaL 

Loads. 


Plonr. . 




2,M4.711 

,'as 
■■11 

.liO.SM 

ss 

.228,M4 
,MO.M« 


K! 
!.*■•! 

gffi 

i>«,:tg 


11 

2»,US 

as 

1<0;934 

n.7u, 


3,078 

8:«so 

4,U4 

i 

im 


'iS 

M.247 

lis 

♦4,887 


4»,5t8 

s 

B3i,Hl 

SJS 

aM,18S 

'■K 

as 




» 
























IS^ 


asv 








Sv"::;;;:: 














December iBt. 




1&,51I 






ESTIMATED STOCKS OF GRAIN, ETC., IN 
LIVERPOOL 



As declared monthiy during 1910. 



IBIO. 


Wheat. 

Centals. 


K£. 


cSk 


Centals. 


oL-S. 


Indian 

CeQtais. 


"af 


IISE 




I 

i 

8 


143,888 

II 

64!03& 




ro.oei 

«,8T3 
49.318 

Ii 


33.177 

IS! 

35,323 
32,685 

m:483 


til 

l.S9E,l% 
1,077,1BB 

rnsis 

Sfl! 


l.(B8 






1 

i 
ii 


m 

i 


^■ss 




u-?5 






/SiKiut'ist: 








Sep^bertat 








Is^i 




g™ 

























•^5 

1 
I 



gli 
nil" 

5:-"! 

Bi- 
ll 
II 



1^ 
11 



ANNUAL IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED KINGDOM. 

An oSidal return of Ihe dtred imports frvm foreign countries of to/teat, maize, barley, 

oatg and wftealen .flour into each port of Vie United Singdom during 

the calendar year 1911 and preceding four years. 

iDdent. Hi, Oeoriie J, S. Broomhftll, Fellow 





mi. 


leio. 


ItOft. 


isoe. 


HOT. 


«naon 


Ovts. 

g;SS 

6.Bii,ax) 

8,231.500 

s.m.im 

1.152.700 

'ii 

BB9.S00 
TM.IOO 
BTSIWO 
5:i.B00 
301,100 

II 
iS 


OwU. 

^'[^500 
^OS^TOO 

3X1.100 

gffl 

BTU.IOO 

Bsslsoo 

348,M10 
4£1,300 

11B.I300 


Owt>. 

is 

Itt.BO) 


Cvts. 
38.409, 4K 
3B,3W.7B7 

iilsiolooo 

4,662,111) 
0.165,600 

ill 

ilosiltio 

S118.»00 

11 

548.H» 

is 

S31.E00 

isi.im 

soiaoo 

18.000 
17,800 


Owts. 








■SB 






outh Shields 

lymouthir'!! Ml !!!/;!. !!!.".'! 
:Bwca*Ue 


E.itSl.WO 
2.328,100 
liOTTlsOO 
1,347.210 














flmsby 


sa 
































144,100 




'ii 






&s 


ffl 

2,300 

{!:iSS 


141 !0M) 
K-SOO 


bi.eoo 












4,000 










sii 

2,000 








HiiOO 

85,300 

JCsoo 


^ 




















JCwo 


































4;m6 








a,TD» 

3:800 


















18.B00 


11,800 










8,100 






























































1,000 
















1«,1B3,S0C 


m,ui,m 


l«,40E.ie8 


ia,0SB.8BO 


14S.TH,eM 





213 



ANNUAL IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED KINGDOM. 

CoNTnOJED. 
SCOTLAND. 



Olasgoi 



Aberdeen 

Granton 

Grangemoatfa 
Oampbeltown 

Greenock 

Inrerness 

Dundee 

Burntisland.. 

Montrose 

Kirkwall 

lierwlck 

Kirkcaldy .... 

Alloa 

Ardrosson .... 
Troon 



Total Scotland. 



1911. 



Owts. 

9,324,900 

7.121.200 

301,700 

90,600 

18,700 

44,000 

96,000 



62,100 

'Ktoo 



17.064,900 



1910. 



Owts. 

9,109,600 

6,974,450 

279,300 

253,000 

46,200 

112,500 

68,800 

""86'.i66 

" i'slaod 

200 



15.883,450 



1909. 



Owts. 

9.576,360 

7,053,580 

448.200 

155,900 

52,000 

129.000 

48,100 

'""^wb 
'" io.Too 



17.528.730 



1908. 



Owts. 

8,987.800 

6,615,550 

319,000 

160,200 

67,760 

210.400 

24.000 

47,800 

32,600 



8,200 



16.473.310 



IRELAND. 



1907. 



Owts. 

10,838,320 

7.244,000 

511,900 

166,900 

71.770 

71.500 

63,000 

56.700 

82,480 

12,300 



19,068,220 



Belfast 

Dublin 

Cork 

Limerick 

Liondonderry 
Waterford... 

Sllgo 

Tralee 

Newry 

Oalway 

Westport 



Total Ireland 



1911. 



Owts. 

6,796.300 

4,283,800 

2,648,900 

2,095.500 

1,087,300 

1,040,000 

852.400 

512.300 

345,700 

87,700 



19.749,900 



1910. 



Owts. 

7,469.800 

3,540.600 

2,458,000 

2,320,900 

&30,800 

720.700 

903,200 

426,100 

285,500 

51,300 



19.000.900 



1909. 



Owts. 

7,738.200 

3,683.400 

2,643,100 

2,340.200 

828,000 

1,106,300 

917.100 

394,900 

418,000 

81,800 

20 



20,151,020 



1908. 



Owts. 

7,449,700 

3,447,000 

2.250,200 

2.333,000 

896,700 

921,100 

1,017.1(0 

109,700 



18,461.900 



1907. 



Owts. 

7,329,400 

3,907,500 

2,937,800 

2,220,900 

1.405,800 

1,867,100 

1,103,400 

560,700 

386,300 

80.400 



21,299,300 



WALES. 





1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


1908. 


1907. 


Cardiff 

Swansea 

Llanelly 


Owts. 

6.970,100 

1,585,300 


Owts. 

7,284.000 

1.368,500 


Owts. 

6.080,500 

1,501,600 


Owts. 

6,063,100 

1.314.900 


Owts. 

5,432,400 

1,363.700 


Total Wales 


8.555.400 


8,652.5001 


r,582,100 


7,378.000 


6.796.100 



ISLE OF MAN. 





1911. 


1910. 


1909. 


1908. 


1907. 


Doucrlas 


Owts. 


Owts. 


Owts. 


Owts. 


Owts. 


Ranufi^y , r . 












Castletown 
























Total Isle of Man 













RECAPITULATION. 



England ... 
Scotland... 

Ireland 

Wales 

lele of Man 



1911. 



Owts. 

144,183,506 

17.064.900 

16,740,900 

8,565,400 



Total United Kingdom 1 189,553,706 



1910. 



Owts. 

144,443,985 

15,883,450 

19,000,900 

8.662,500 



187,980,835 



1900. 



Owts. 

142,402.188 

17,526,730 

20.161.020 

7,582,100 



187.662,038 



1908. 



Owts. 

128,033,860 

16,475,310 

18,461,900 

7,378,000 



170,347,070 



1907. 



Owts. 

146,794,606 

19,068,220 

21,299,300 

0,796,100 



193,968,226 



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FOREIGN WEIGHTS AND MBASURES, "WrTH 
AMERICAN EQUIVALENTS. 

Ike following table embnuxs truly sttcfi vxightg aiid mtatwres at are givm fimm t 
to time in consular report* and in the coui-ae of commercial Ttlaiiotu. 



Tartugd 

ESTPt. . . . . . 

PortDsal 

AcgcotiDa... 



\^aHIU 



CubL Spidn Bnd Vmenid*.. ■ 



Cub«,8 






Miatd. 

Colambia. 

Heiioo ud Bft]T*dor. . 



Centnl Aiaaiitt. . . . 



Siun (Kayui) 

Argentina 

Uruguay 

QrafttftiUiD. 



8p«b... 



CMlnl Amortek. 

Chlls 

Cub* 

Hailoii.... 



4.423a>lloD*. 
7.A90TbaBhda. 



AM pooDdi. 
«.40S4 pooiuk. 




78.9y»Hia 



O.Mwn. 
10, BI pomuta. 



l.M738bialMb. 
Strika bowK, 70 pooni 
FuU tu^B, 118 pmndL 



•Hon fnqiMotly oallMi "kin." AmoDg aurAaoli In tlw tnmtr parte ft •qiwia 1.8 



FOREIGN WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, WITH 
AMERICAN EQUIVALENTS-CoNTrauED. 





WhrnoMd. 








i'dfSS. 










Wjnuada. 
































:&-^ 










































j£^;::::;:;::::::;:;::::::::: 






















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S2 2-7 pound). 














































.TZaSponndj. 


























































«T<S; 




























J:iSICbi 







218 



FOREIGN WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, WITH 

AMERICAN equivalents-Continued. 



Denominatioiui. 



larter 

Quintal 

euintaL 

luintaL 

Quintal 

quintal 

[uintal 

luintal 

[uintal 

Rin' !!!!!!!;;! 

Rottle 

Rottle 

Sacene 

Sabn 

Se 

Seer 

Shaku 

Sho 

Standard 

Stone 

Suerte 

Sun 

Tael 

Tan 

Tieroe 

To (dry) 

To (Uquid) 

Tola. 

Tonde 

Tondeland 

Tsubo 

Tmin 

Tun 

Tunna. 

Tunnland 

Vara 

Vara 

Vara 

Vara 

Vara 

Vara 

Vara 

Vara 

Vedio 

Venetian pound 

Vergees 

Venit 

Vlocka 



Where uaed. 

London (ooal) 

Argentina 

BraiU 

Castile, *Chile and Peru 

Greece 

Merioo 

Newfoundland (fish) 

Paraguay 

Syria 

Ji4>an , 

Japan 

Palestine. 

Syria 

Riuaia 

Malta , 

Japan , 

India 

Japan 

Japan 

St. Petersburg (lumber measure) . . . . 

Qreat Britain 

Uruguay 

Japan 

Cochin China 

Japan 

Newfoundland 

Japan 

Japan 

Japan 

Denmark (cereals) 

Denmark 

Japan 

China. 

Newfoundland (cod oil) 

Sweden 

Sweden 

Argentina 

Central America 

Chile and Peru 

Cuba 

Curacao 

Mexico 

Paraguay 

Venesuem 

Russia 

Greece and Mediterranean countries 

Isle of Jersey 

Russia. 

Russian Poland 



American equiTaleata. 



36 bushels. 
101.42 pounds. 
130.06 pounds. 
101.41 pounds. 
123.2 pounds. 
101.46 pounds. 
112 pounds. 
100 pounds. 
126 ix>unds. 
2.4«93mileB. 
0.5707 grains. 

6 pounds. 
5n pounds. 

7 feet. 

490 pounds. 

119 square yards. 

1 pound 13 ounces. 

11.9305 inches. 

1.6 dry quarts. 

165 cubic feet. 

14 pounds. 

2.700 cuadras (see onadn). 

1 . 193 inches. 

590 . 75 grains (Troy). 

0.245 acre. 

300 pounds. 

2.044 pecks. 

4.765 fi;aUons. 

180 grams. 

3.94783 bushels. 

1.36 acres. 

35.581 square feet 

1.41 inches. 

806 gallons. 

4.5 Bushels. 

1.22 acres. 

34.1208 inches. 

32.87 inches. 

32.91 inches. 

33.384 inches. 

33.375 inches. 

32.992 inches. 

34 inches. 

33.384 inches. 

2.707 Britiih laptrial Ballni. 

1.05 pounds. 

71 . 1 square rods. 

0.663 mile. 

41.98 acres. 



^Although the metric weights are used o£5cially in Spain, the Castile ouintal is employed in 
commerce in the Peninsula and colonies, save in Catalonia; the CatiJan quintal equals 91 . 71 pounds. 



Metric Weights and Measures, 



METRIC WEIGHTS. 

Milli|Eram (O.OOlfgram) equals 0.0154 grain. 
Centigram (0.01 gram) equals 0.1543 griun. 
Decigram (0.1 gram) equals 1.5432 grains. 
Gram equals 15.432 grams. 
Decagram (10 grams) equals 0.3527 ounce 

avoirdupois. 
Hectogram (100 grams) equals 3.5274 ounces 

avoirdupois. 
Kilogram (1,(X)0 grams) equals 2.2046 pounds 

avoirdupois. 
Myriagram (10,000 grams) equals 22.046 pounds 

avoirdupois. 
Quintal (100,000 grams) equals 220.46 pounds 

avoirdupois. 
Ifillier or tonneau — ton (1,000,000 grams) equals 

2,204.6 pounds avoirdupois. 

METRIC DRY MEASURES. 

Milliliter (0.001 liter)reqnals 0.061 cubic inch. 
Centiliter (0.01 liter) equals 0.6102 cubic inch. 
Deciliter (0 . 1 liter) equals 6 . 1023 cubic inches, 
liter equals 0.908 quart. 
Decaliter (10 liters) equals 9.08 quarts. 
Hectoliter (100 liters) equals 2.838 bushels. 
Eiloliter (1,000 liters) equab 1.308 cubic yards. 



METRIC LIQXnD MEASURES. 

Milliliter (0.001 liter) equals 0.0338 fluid ounce. 

Centiliter (0.01 liter) equals 0.338 fluid ounce. 

Deciliter (0. 1 liter) equals 0.845 gilL 

Liter equals 1 .0567 quarts. 

Decaliter (10 liters) equals 2.6417 nDons. 

Hectoliter (100 liters) equals 26.417 ffollons. 

Kiloliter (1.000 liters) equals 264.17 gallons. 

METRIC MEASURES OF LENGTH. 
Millimeter (0.001 meter) equals 0.0394 inch. 
Centimeter (0.01 meter) equals 0.3937 inch. 
Decimeter (0.1 meter) equab 3.937 inches. 
Meter equfus 39 . 37 inches. 
Decameter (10 meters) equals 393.7 inches. 
Hectometer (100 meters) equals 328 feet 1 inch. 
Kilometer (1,000 meters) equals 0.62187 mile 

(3,280 feet 10 inches). 
Blynameter (10.000 meters) equals 6.2137 milai. 

METRIC SURPACE ICEASURES. 
Centare (1 square meter) equals 1,550 sqoan 

inches. 
Are (100 square meters) equals 119.6 sooan 

yards. 
Hectare (10,(XX) square meters) equals 2.471 



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GENERAL INDEX. 



PAoa 

Acreage and production of winter and spring wheat in the U. 8. for a series of years IM 

* of the grain crops of Illinois for a series of years 18S 

' Of wheat, com, oats, rjre and barley in Illinois 184-198 

* Of wheat, com, oats, rye, barley, buckwheat, hay, potatoes, flaxseed and tobacco 

in the U. 8 174-179 

Alien passengers arrived in the United States for a series of srears 141 

American vessel tonnage engaged in the foreign commerce of the United States. 144 

Amsterdam, freights for grain, flour and provisions from Chicago to, for four years 108 

Antwerp, freights for grain, flour and provisions from Chicago to, for four years 108 

* Vessel tonnage of 145 

Argentine exports of wheat and com 14&-147 

Arrival of vessels in the Chicago District 124 

Arrivals and clearances of vessels at Chicago, tonnage of 120 

Atlantic ports, weekly export of flour, grain and provisions from the principal 164 

* * Exports of flour, wheat and com from 158-167 

* ' Exports of hog products from 168 

Australian exports of wheat and com 140-147 

Austrian vessel tonnage engaged in the foreign commerce of the United States. 144 

* Import duties on wheat 204 

Average freights for wheat and com from Chicago to New York for a series of years 108 

'All-nul" shipments, eastbound from Chicago 58-01 



lACON, exports of from the United States to France and Germany for a series of yean. . . . 161 

Baltimore, exports of flour, wheat and com from. 155-157 

* Exports of hog products from 158 

* Vessel tonnage of 146 

Banks, The National, of Chicago, condition of 118 

' The State, of Chicago, condition of 114 

Bariey, exports of the United States, by crop and calendar years. 180 

* Beoeipts and exports of, at New York. 171 

* Crops of Illinok 192-198 

* Crops of, in niinais 188 

' Crops of the United States, by sUtes. 176 

' Crops of the worid 181 

' Receipts and exports of, at San Francisco 109 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago 2-8 

* Receipts of, at Chicago, by crops 4 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 10 

' In store and by sample, range of prices for, at Chicago 17 

' Receipts and ddpments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 18-19 



272 



Barley, Inspection of, at Chicago 37 

* In store in Chicago, weekly, for two years 20-21 

" Weekly receipts and shipments of, at Chicago 22-23 

* Visible supply of. weekly, for two years in the United States and Canada 24-25 

' Eastbound shipments of, from Chioaco, by rail 68 

* Daily prices for cash of 62-85 

* Shipments of. from Chicago, by lake 123 

Beans, price of, weekly, at Chicago 94 

Beef, exports of, from the United States 150 

* Shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 128 

* (Tierces and barrels) eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 50 

* Packages, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 103 

' * receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 104-105 

* Packing at Chicago for a series of years. 44 

* ProductA, weekly cash prices of, at Chicago 40 

Belgian vessel tonnage engaged in the foreign commerce of the United States 144 

* Import duties on wheat 204 

Board of Trade. Monthly clearings and balances of Clearing House of the. for six years .... 112 

* * Membership of the Chicago 210 

Bordeaux, freights for provisions from Chicago to. for four years 108 

Boston, exports of flour, wheat and com from 155-157 

* Exports of hog products from 158 

* Lake and rail freights for grain from Chicago to 106 

* Vessel tonnage of 145 

Breadstuffs, exports of, to Europe 152 

Bristol, freights for flour and grain from New York to 172 

British vessel tonnage engaged in the foreign commerce of the United States 144 

Broom-corn, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 103 

* Eastbound shipments of. from Chicago, by rail 50 

* Shipments of, from Chicago, by lake 123 

Buckwheat, crops of, in the United States, by states 177 

Buffalo, freights for grain from Chicago to 10&-107 

Bulgaria, import duties on wheat in 204 

Bushel meastire in various states 104 

Butter, exports of, from the United States 150 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 50 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 101 

* Prices, of, weekly, at Chicago 102 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 104-105 



Canal statistics (official) IStV-lSS 

Canned Meats, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 103 

* * Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 50 

Cargo, tonnage of vessels, at Chicago, for a series of srears 126 

Cash prices of mras pork at Chicago, bi-monthly, for nine years 46 

" " Of hog products at Chicago, weekly 50-51 

" *' Of prime steam lard at Chicago, bi-monthly, for nine years 47 

" " Of beef products at Chicago, weekly 40 

*' *' Monthly, of grain, provisions, grass and flaxseeds 96 

Cattle receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 41 

" Ranges of prices for, at Chicago, weekly. 48 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 44 

* Number and value of, in the United States 106 

Charleston, exports of flour, wheat and com from 155-157 

Cheese, exports of, from the United States 150 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 50 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 101 

* Prices of, weekly, at Chicago. 102 

C«hicago, population of 140 



273 



PAQB 

CbioAgo Grain Reoeipts, by crops. 4 

Flotir and Grain Reoeipta for five srean 178 

Valuation of real and iwrsonal property in, for taxation, for a series of years 163 

Taxes levied on real estate and x)er8onal property in, for a series of years 163 

Public debt of, for a series of years 163 

Lake oommeroe of 121-130 

Vessel tonnage of 124-126-128 

Capadty of elevators at 88, 89 

r^ • Number of miles of railway communicating directly with 166 

Cindnnata, pork packing in, for a series of years 45 

dearanoes of vessels in the Chicago District 124, 125 

Clearing House. Chicago, monthly clearances and balances of the, for nx years Ill 

* * Of the Board of Trade, clearings and balances of the, for six years 112 

Clover Seed, monthly cash prices of, in Chicago 96 

Coal, Prices of, at Chicago, monthly 94 

^ * Reoeipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 104, 105 ' 

M * Reoeipts and shipments of, by lake 122, 123 

Coins, value of foreign 214, 216 

Coke, prices of, at Chicago monthly 94 

Consols English, prices of 205 

Contract Wheat, stocks of in Chicago, monthly, for nx years 29 

liH* Pork and Lard, stocks of, in Chicago, for ten years 110 

Copenhagen, freights for flour and provisions from Chicago to 108 

Com, exports of, the United States, by crop and calendar years 180 

Exports of, to Europe, for a series of years 152 

( 7-1* Exports of. from AUantic ports 153, 154, 157 

^* Exports of, from various countries 147 

Exports of, from the United States to various countries 168 

Crops of the United States 174 

Receipts and shipments of, at New Orleans 170 

Recdpts and'exports of, monthly, at New York 171 

Crops of Illinois 186, 187 

Crops of, in lUinms, for a series of years 183 

Receipts and exports of, at San Francisco 169 

London prices and statistics of imports and quantities of, on passage 206, 207 

Range of prices of, in Liverpool, weekly 208, 209 

Reoeipts and shipments of, at Chicago 2, 3 

Receipts of, at Chicago, by crops '. 4 

Reoeipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 10 

Range of prices of, in Chicago 11 

Range of prices of No. 2 (cash), in Chicago, monthly 12-06 

Current prices of, in Chicago, on the 1st and 16th of each month, for seven years. . . 15 

Reodpts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 18, 19 

Inspection of, in Chicago 87 

In store in Chicago, weekly, for the past two years 20. 21 

Reodpts and shipments of, at Chicago, weekly 22, 23 

Viable supply of, weekly, for two years in the United States and Canada 24, 25 

Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 58 

Viable supply of, monthly, for nine years, in the United States and Canada 26, 27 

Daily prices for cash and future deliveries of 62-85 

Frdght charges for, from Chicago to New York, for a series of srears 108 

Exports of, from Chicago, by lake 120 

Lake and rail frdghts for, from Chicago to eastern pdnts. 106 

Freights for, by lake and Erie canal 107 

Transported by Illinois and Michigan canal 138 

Reodpts and shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 122, 123 

Com*meal, reodpts and exports of, monthly, at New York 171 

Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 61 

Reodpts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 103 

Cotton, ivoduction, imports and exports of, in the United States, for a series of years 200 

* EngUsh prices of, for the past two seasons 205 

Cotton Seed Oil, monthly range of prices of, in Chicago, for a series of years 87 



274 



9Amm 

Crop, and srearly gnin exports from the United States. 181^ 

Crops, grain, of the United States 174-177 

Current prices of the leadins speoulatiTe articles at Chicago 6S-Wr 

• • Daily, of flaxseed 86 

Customs, ooUeotions of the principal districts in the United States 1S5 

Custom house, Chicago business transacted in the inspector's division of the 192 



Daily current prices for the leading speculatiye articles, at Chicago.. 89-8& 

* Current prices for flaxseed 80^ 

Danubian exports of wheat and com 146| 147 

Debt, public, of Illincus, for a series of years. 188 

* Public, of Chicago, tot a series of yean 168 

* PubUc, of the United States. 142, 148^ 

Denmark, import duties on wheat in 204 

Detroit flour and grain recdpts for five years 178 

Domestic exports of the United States 149 

" Produce, receipts of, at San Francisco 168 

Dre ss ed Hogs, Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 60 

Duluth flour and grain receipts for five years 178 

Dutch vessel tonnage engaged in the foreign commerce of the U. S., for a series of yean 144 

Duties collected on imported merchandise, at Chicago, monthly, for five years. 181 

' * On merchandise entered for consumption at the port of Chicago 134 

* * By the internal revenue department of the First District of Dlinais 133 

* * In the principal districts of the United States. 185 

* * United States, on cereals and farm products. 208 

Duty on flour and grain imported into the principal countries of the worid 204 



Eastbound shlpmentsof various Commodities from Chicago, by raQ 68-61 

EggVt prices of, weekly, at Chicago 102 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail, weekly 60 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of yean 102 

England, imports of flour and grain into, for five yean 211 

English prices of money, cotton, wheat, etc, for the past two seasons. 208 

Elevator warehouses, Chicago, the capacity and rates of storage 38, 80 

Erie Canal, grain freights by 107 

Europe, exports of breadstufFs to 152 

* Exports to, of flour, wheat and com. 168 

* Wheat crops of 182 

Exports of the United States, for a series of years. 148 

* Of wheat and com from various countries 14^147 

■ Domestic of the United States, for three yean 140 

* Of breadstuffs to Europe 162 

* Of flour and grain to foreign countries 168 

* Of flour, wheat and com from Atlantic ports 168'167 

" Of hog products from Atlantic ports. 168 

* Of flour and grain from the United States (by crops and yean) 168-180 

* Of flour, wheat and com from the United States and countries to which exported. . . 168 

* Of beef, hog products, cheese and butter 150 

* Of flour, grain, etc., at New York, monthly 171 

' Of wheat and flour from the United Kingdom, for a series of yean. 211 

* Of cotton, for a series of yean 200 

* Of flour, grain and provinons from the principal Atlantic porta, weeUy 164-168 

* Of hog products from the United States to France and Qermany for a Miiss of ye atSb. 161 

* From Chicago, by lake 126 

" Value of , from Qiicago, by lake, for five srears. 126 



275 

PAQB 

FaBM animalB, number and yalue of, in the United States. , 106~197 

First frost of each year, at various points in the U. 8.. for sixteen years 198, 100 

Flaneed. rates for inspecting and weighing 86 

' Eastbound shipments of. from Chicago, by rail 58 

' Receipts and shipments of. at Chicago, by routes and by months 02 

' Daily current prices of, at Chicago 86 

' Monthly cash prioes of, at Chicago 06 

' Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 104, 106 

' Shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 123 

' Crop of United States, by states 178 

Floor, exports of the United States, by crop and calendar years 180 

' Exports of, to Europe 152 

* Exports of, to foreign countries 152, 168 

' Exports of, from Atlantic ports 153-155 

' Exports of, from the United States to various countries 168 

* Receipts of, at principal western river and lake ports, for five years 173 

' Receipts and exports of, monthly, at New York 171 

' Receipts and shipments of, at New Orleans 170 

' Production and imports of, in the United Kingdom, for a series of years 211 

' Receipts and exports of, at San Frandsco 160 

' Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago 2, 3 

' Manufactured in Chicago for the past ten years 4 

* Stock of, in Chicago, monthly, for eight years 4 

' Range of prices of, in Chicago, weekly 7 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 5 

' Receipts of, by crops, in Chicago 6 

' Current prices of, in Chicago, on the 1st and 16th of each month, for seven years. . . 14 

' Manufactured and received in, and shipped from Chicago, for a series of years 18, 10 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, weekly 22, 23 

' Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 58 

' Rates at Chicago for inspecting 35 

' Exports of, from Chicago, by lake 126 

' Lake and rail freights for, from Chicago to Eastern points 106 

* Rail freights for, from Chicago to Eastern pmnts. 100 

* Freight rates for, from Chicago to European ports 108 

* Ocean freights for, from New York to British x>orta 172 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 122, 123 

* Foreign countries, exports of flour and grain to, for a series of years 152 

Foreign Commerce of the United States, nationality of .the vessels engaged in the 144 

* Freight rates on flour, grain and provisions from Chicago to European ports 108 

* Weights and measures. 202, 203,216-218 

* Values of, coins and currencies 214, 215 

Franoe, exports ot hog products from the United States to, for a series of years 161 

* Import duties on wheat in 204 

FMghta, foreign, on flour, grain and providons, from Chicago to European ports 108 

' For transportation of wheat from Chicago to New York, for a series of sreais. 108 

* Lake and rail, for grain, from Chicago to Eastern points. 106 

« Qrain, by lake and Brie canal 107 

* Rail, for flour, grain and providons, from Chicago to Eastern points. 100 

* Ocean, for flour and grain, from New York to British ports 172 

Franeh vessel tonnage engaged in the foreign commerce of the United States 144 

F^sth meats, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 42 

Froilt first* of each srear, for sixteen years, at various points In the United States 108, 100 



Galveston, exports of flour, wheat and oom from. 150-167 

Osnnaa vessel tonnage engaged In the foreign commeroe of the United States 144 

Qerasany, exports of hog products, from the United States to, for a series of yean 161 

* Import duties on wheat In 204 



276 



FAOB 

GlMgow, freishto for flour, srain and provisioiis from Chicago to« 108 

' Ocean freichts for flour and grain from New York to 173 

Grain, exports of, to foreign countriei, for a aeries of years 168, 108» 180 

Shipments Eastbound from Chicago, by raiL 68 

Exports of the United States, by orop and calendar years 180 

Receipts of, at principal western river and lake ports, for the past five years. 173 

Crops of the United States 174-179 

■ Of Illinois 184-198 

* Of Illinois for a series of years. 18S 

■ Of the world 181-182 

Weekly exports of, from the principal Atlantic ports 164, 168, 167 

Weekly range of prices of, in Liverpool 308, 200 

The entire movement of, at Chicago 2, 8 

Receipts of. at Chicago, by crops 4 

Inspection of, in Chicago 87 

In store at Chicago, weekly, for two years SO, 21 

Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, weekly 22, 28 

Stocks of, in Liverpool, monthly, for two years 208 

Visible supply of, in the United States and Canada, for two years. 24, 26 

Visible supply of, in the United States and Canada, monthly for nine years 28, 27 

Rules governing the inspection of, in Chicago 28, 33 

Inspection, extracts from the rules of the railroad and Warehouse Commissioners itfl 

for the administration of the department of 84 

Inspection and weighing, rates for 36, 80 

Freights by lake and Erie Canal 107 

Rail freights for, from Chicago to Eastern points 100 

Freights for, from Chicago to European ports 108 

Ocean freights for, from New York to British ports 172 

Grass seeds, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 01, 92 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 68 

* Prices of, at Chicago, weekly 93 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 104, 106 

* Exports of, from Chicago, by lake 128 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 123, 123 

Great Britain, exports to, of flour, wheat and com 163 

Grease, monthly range of prices of, at Chicago for a series of years 89 

Greece, import duties on wheat in 204 



Ham, exports of, from the United States to France and Germany, for a series of years 101 

Hamburg, freights for flour and provisions from Chicago to 108 

* Vessel tonnage of 146 

Hay, prices of baled, in carload lots, at Chicago 98 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 98 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 00 

' Crops of the United States, by states 177 

Havre, freights for provisions ^m Chicago to 108 

Hides, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months. 96 

* Prices of, at Chicago, monthly 97 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 60 

* Receipts and i^pments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 104, 106 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 122, 128 

Highest and lowest cash jKioes for the leading speculative articles. 98 

Hog products, exports of, from Atlantic ports 164-168 

' * Daily current prioes for 83-86 

' * Exported from the United States 169 

* * Exports of , to France and Germany, for a series of years. 101 

* * Receipts and shipments of, other than lard, at Chicago, by routes and by 

months. 48 

* * Cash prioss of. at Chicago, weekly 60, 61 



277 

PAGS 

Hoti, number of, packed in the MiaaiMippi valley and Chioago* for a Beiiei of years 4ft 

* Number of, packed in the Miasiasippi valley during the past six regular seasons 62, 53 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 40 

* Range of prices of, weekly, at Chicago 4& 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of jrears 44 

* Daily cash prices of, at Chicago 6^-8ft 

* DreMcd, eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 60 

' Number and value of, in the United States. .' 197 

Holland, import duties on wheat in 204 

Hops, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 103 

' Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by raU 61 

Horses, number and value of, in the United States 195 

Hull, imports of flour and grain at, for the past five years. 212 



Illinois, popuution of i40, i84. 1&5 

Grain crops of, for a series of years 183 

Grain crops of 174-177, 183-193 

State valuations of property for taxation in, for a series of years 162 

Public debt of, for a series of years 162 

And Michigan canal, statistics of the 136-138 

Central railroad statistics 164 

Hogs packed in, during the six past regular seasons 62, 53 

Duties collected by the Internal Revenue Department of the first district of 133 

And Michigan canal, articles and passengers transported by the 138 

Immigrants arrived in the United States 141 

Import duties on grain and flour, in the principal countries of the world 204 

Imports of the United States, for a series of years 148 

* Of merchandise into the United States 160, 151 

* Of wheat and flour into the United Kingdom, for a aeries of years 210 

' Of flour and grain into the United Kingdom, for the past five years 212, 213 

* Into the United States, of cotton 200 

Imported merchandise, duties collected on, at Chicago, monthly, for five years 131 

* Merchandise, duties collected on and value of. at Chicago 134 

India, exi>orts of wheat and corn from 146^ 147 

Indiana, hogs packed in, during the past six regular seasons 62, 63 

Indianapolis, pork packing in, for a series of years 46 

Inspection of grain at Chicago 37 

* Rules governing the, of grain, in Chicago 28-33 

* Of grain, extracts from the rules of the Railroad and Warehouse Commisrioners 

relating thereto, 34 

* Of grain and provisions, rates for the 36, 36 

Internal Revenue collections in the first district of Illinois 133 

Iowa, number of hogs x>acked in, during the i>ast six regular seasons 62, 63 

Ireland, imports of flour and grain into, for the past five yean 218 

Iron, range of prices for, in Chicago 119, 120 

Italian vessel tonnage engaged in the foreign commerce of the United States 144 

* Import duties on wheat. 204 



Kansas, number of hogs packed in, during the past six regular seasons 62, 68 

ffnniniff City, pork packing in, for a series of years 46 

* * Grain receipts for five years 178 

Kantoeky, number of hogs packed in, during the past six regular seasons 62, 68 



278 



Lake, Receipts and ahipments of flour and grain by, at Chioaco 

Receipts and shipments of flour and wheat by, at Chicaco 

Receipts and shipments of com and oats by, at Chicaco 

Receipts and shipments of rye and barley by, at Chicaco 

Receipts and shipments of hog products, other than lard by. at Chicaco. 
Rec^pts and shipments of lard and fresh meats by, at Chicago 



2. 8 

5 

10 

16 

48 

42 

Receipts and shipments of seeds by, at Chicaco 91, 92 

96 

98 

99 

101 

103 

128 

126 

126 

106 

107 

122 

123 

121 



Receipts and shipments of hides and wool by, at Chicaco 

Receipts and shipments of potatoes and hay by, at Chicago. . . . 
Receipts and shipments of lumber and shingles by, at Chicago. . 
Receipts and shipments of butter and cheese by. at Chicaco. . . . 
Receipts and shipments of various commodities by, at Chicaco. 
Receipts and shipments by, from Chicaco and South Chicaco. . 

Exports from Chicaco by 

Value of exports from Chicaco by. for fiye years 

And rail freichts for crain to eastern points 

Grain freichts by, from Chicaco 

Receipts and shipments at Chicaco by 

Shipments from Chicaco 

Lakes, openinc of navication on the. for a series of years 



Lard, exports of, from the principal Atlantic ports, weekly 154-158 

* Ranee of prices of, in Liverpool, weekly 209 

* Exports of, from the United States to France and Germany, for a series of years.. . . 161 

* Contract stocks of. in Chicaco, for the past ten years 110 

* Cash prices of, at Chicaco, weekly 50 

' Cash prices of. at Chicaco, monthly 96 

* Prime steam, current prices of, at Chicaco, bi-monthly, for nine years 47 

* Prime steam, stocks of, in store at Chicaco, monthly, for five years 57 

* Stocks of, in Chioaco, for six years 54 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicaco. by rail 59 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicaco, by routes and by months 42 

* Daily prices for cash and future deliyeries of, at Chicaco 62^85 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chioaco, for a series of years 104, 105 

Liyerpool crain and provision market, weekly ranee of prices in the 208, 209 

* Freichts for flour, crain and provisions, from Chicaco to 106 

* Imports of flour and craii^ At, for the past five years 212 

* Ocean freichts for flour and crain, from New York to 172 

* Vessel tonnace of, for a series of years 145 

* Stocks of crain at, for two years 210 

* Stocks of provisions at. 201 

London, wheat and com prices in, and statistics of imports and quantities '*on paHace*' 206, 207 

* Freichts for flour, crain and provisions, from Chioaco to 108 

* Freichts for flour and crain, from New York to 172 

* Imports of flour and crain at, for the past five years 212 

* Vessel tonnace of, for a series of years. 145 

Louisville, pork paokinc in, for a series of years 45 

Lowest and hichest cash prices for the leadinc speculative articles 96 

Lumber, stocks of, in Chicaco, on January 1, for a series of years 99 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicaco, by routes 99 

* Eastboimd shipments of, from Chioaco, by rail 60 

* Tri-monthly prices of, by vessel carco, at Chicaco 100 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicaco, for a series of years 104, 105 

* Transported by Illinois and Michigan oanal 188 

* Reoeii»ta and shipments of, at Chioaco, by lake 122, 123 



lACKINACf openinc of navication at the Straits of. for a aeries of srsars., 
Maltt receipts and shipments of, at Chioaco, by routea 

* Shipments of, at Chioaco, by lake 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chioaco, by rail 



121 
108 



61 



279 



PAOB 

ManeOles, rmaeH tonnafle of 145 

MeMures, foreign weights and 202, 208, 216, 218 

Meata (oared), eaatbound ehipmenta of, from Chicago, by rail 60 

* (fresh), eaatbound ■hipmenta of, from Chicago, by rail 50 

MemberehipB of the Chicago Board of Trade 210 

Merohandifle, Imports of, into the United States, for four years 150, 161 

* Imported, value and duties on, at Chicago 184 

* Imported, duties eollected on, at Chicago, monthly, for fire jrears. 181 

Mees pork, cash prices of, in C^oago. bi-monthly, for nine years 40 

■ * ''Contract" stock of , in Chicago, for ten years 110 

' * Range of, cash prices for 00 

Michigan, number of hogs packed in, during the past eix regular seasons 52, 68 

Millstu£Fs, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 103 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 122, 128 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 61 

Milwaukee, pork i>acking in, for a series of srears 45 

* Flour and grain receipts for five years 178 

Minneapolis flour and grain receipts for five years 178 

Minnesota, number of hogs x>aoked in, during the past six regular seasons 52, 58 

Mississippi Valley, number of hogs packed in the, for a series of years 45 

* * Number of hogs packed in the, during the past six regular seasons 52 

Missouri, number of hogs packed in, during the past six regular seasons 52, 53 

Mobile, exports of flour, wheat and com from 155-157 

Money, prices of English 205 

■ Value of foreign 214, 215 

Montreal, exports of flour, wheat, corn and hog products from 155-158 

Movement of flour and grain in Chicago 2, 8 

* * * grain and various commodities, eastbound from Chicago, by rail 58-61 

Mules, number and value of, in the United States 105 



lATIONAL banks of Chicago, the condition of the 118 

Nationality of vessel tonnage entered at the ports of the United States 144 

Navigation, opening of, at the Straits of Mackinac, for a series of years. 121 

Nebraska, number of hogs x>acked in, during the past six regular seasons. 52i 58 

New Orleans, exports of flour, wheat com and hogs products from 155*158 

* ' Monthly receipts and shipments of flour and grain at 170 

* * Vessel tonnage of 145 

Newport News, exports of flour, wheat and corn from 15&-157 

New York, exports of flour, wheat, com and hog products from 155-158 

' ' Vessel tonnage of ' 145 

* * Receipts and exports of flour, grain, etc., monthly 171 

' * Lake and rail freights for grain from Chicago to 106 

* * Lake and canal freights for grain from Chicago to 107 

* * Ocean freights for flour and grain from, to British ports 172 

Norfolk, exports of flour, wheat and com from 155. 157 

Norway, import duties on wheat in 204 



Oatmeal, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 103 

* Eastbound shipments of. from Chicago, by rail 61 

Oats, crops of the United States 175 

* Receipts and exports of, monthly, at New York 171 

* Exports of the United States, by crop and calendar years 168-180 

* Crops of, in Illinois for a series of years 188 

* Crops of Illinois 175. 188. 180 

* Crops of the world. 181 

* Receipts and exports of. at San Francisoo 160 



280 

PAOB 

Oata, reoeipto and ihipmeBto of, at New Orleaoa. 170 

' Export* of, from the principal Atlantie ports, weekly IM 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chioaco. 2,Z 

* Receipts of, at Chieaco, by crops 4 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chieaco, by roates and by months 10 

' Ranee of prices of, in Chioaco 11-06 

* Ranee of cash prices of, in Chieaco, monthly lS-96 

* Current prices of, in Chieaco. on the 1st and 16th of each month, for seven yean.. . . 15 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chieaco, for a series of years 18, 19 

' Inspection of, at Chieaco S7 

* In store, in Chieaco, weekly, for two years. 30, 21 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chieaco, weekly 22, 2S 

* Visible supply of, weekly, for two years, in the United States and Canada. 24, 25 

' Visible supply of, monthly, for nine years, in the United States and Canada. 26, 27 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chieaco, by real 58 

* Daily prices for essh and future ddiyeries of, at Chieaco. v 63-85 

' Exports of, from Chieaco, by lake 136 

* Transported by Illinois and Michican oanal 138 

* Shipments of, from Chieaco, by lake 122, 128 

Ohio, number of hoes packed in, durinc the past six recular seasons. 52, 53 

Oil cake, receipts and diipments of, at Chieaco, by routes. 103 

* Exports of, from Chieaco, by lake 126 

' Shipments of, at Chioaco. by lake. 122, 123 

' Eastbound shipments of. from Chieaco, by rail 61 

Oleo-Stearine, monthly ranee of prices of, at Chieaco, for a series of years 87 

Omaha, pork paokinc in, for a series of years. 45 

* Grain receipts for five years 173 



Peas, reoelpts and exports of, in New York, monthly*. 171 

Pensaoola, exports of flour, wheat and oom from. 155-157 

Peoria, flour and gnia receipts for five years 173 

Personal property in Chieaco, valuation of, for taxation, for a series of years 163 

Philadelphia, exports of flour, wheat, com and hoc products from 155-158 

' Lake and rail freiehta for cnun from Chieaco to 106 

* Vessel tonnaee of 145 

Population of Chieaco 140 

* Of Illinois 140, 184, 185 

■ Of the United States 140 

' Of the United Einedom 211 

Pork, exports of, from the principal Atlantic ports, weekly 154 

* Paddne in the Missiseippi valley and Chieaco. for a series of years. 45 

* Packinc in the Missisnppi valley for the past six recular seasons. 52, 53 

* Paddne in the principal western dties. for a series of years 45 

* Exports of, from the United States to France and Germany, for a series of years 161 

* Contract stocks of, in Chieaco. for the past ten years. 110 

* Mess, cash prices of, at Chioaco, bi-monthly, for nine years 46 

* Mess, hiehest and lowest cash prices of. for two years 06 

* Mess stocks of, in store in Chioaco. monthly, for five years 57 

* Paokinc at Chioaco, for a series of yearsi 44 

* Bbls., eastbound shipments of, from Chioaco, by rail 50 

I * Daily prices for cash and future deliveries of, at Chioaco 03-85 

I * Exports of, from Chieaco, by lake 126 

I « Shipments of, from Chieaco, by lake 122, 123 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chioaco, for a series of years 104, 105 

I Port Arthur, exports of flour, wheat and corn from 15&-157 

Portiand, exports of flour, wheat corn and hoe products from 166-158 

Portueuese vessel tonnaee eneaeed in the forden oommeroe of the United States 144 

M ' Import duties on wheat 304 

'. Post-offioe, Chioaco. budness transacted at the 116-118 



281 

VAGB 

Potatoes, prioM of, at Chioaco, weekly 04 

* Beoeipta uid ■hipmenta of, at Chioaco 98 

* Eaatboimd Bhipments of, from Chioaco, by rail 61 

' Cropa of the Uxuted States, by Btatee 170 

Prioe of flour, at Chioaco, weekly 7 

* Of wheat in store, at Chioaco, weekly 8 

* Of wheat, at Chioaco, monthly, for a series of years. 9 

' Of oom and oats, at Chioaco, weekly 11 

* Of oom, at Chioaco, monthly, for a series of years. 18 

* Of ootton seed oil, tallow craase and stearins, at Chioaco 87-00 

' Of oats, at Chioaco, monthly, for a series of years. 13 

* Of rye and barley, at Chioaco, weekly 17 

* Of flaxseed, daily, at Chioaco 80-88 

' Of oattle, hoes and sheep, at Chioaco, weekly 48 

* Of beef produots, at Chioaco, weekly. 4» 

* Of the leadlnc speculative artioles, at Chioaco. daily 63-85 

' Of sah and seed, at Chioaco, weekly 98 

■ Of hides, at Chioaco 07 

* Of oosl and soke, at Chioaco 04 

' Of hay, at Chioaco 08 

* Of lumber, shinclwi, ete., at Chioaco, tri-monthly 100 

* Of beans and potatoes, at Chioaco, weekly 04 

Production of winter and sprinc wheat in the United States, for a series of years 104 

' Of cotton in the United States, for a series of years 200 

Provisions, exports of, from the principal Atlantic ports, weekly 154^168 

* Ranee of prices of, in lirerpool, weekly 208, 200 

* Rates for inspectinc and weichinc, at Chioaco 86, 36 

* Stocks of. In Chioaco 57 

* Stocks of, in Chioaco, for five years 64r-66 

* Stocks of, at Liverpool 201 

* Fteicht rates for, from Chioaco to European ports 108 

Pubfic debt of the United States. 142-148 

* • Of Illinois 162 

' ' Of Chioaco, for a series of years. 168 



Rail freichts for flour and cndn, from Chicaco to eastern points 100 

* Shipments, esstbound, from Chioaco, weekly 68-61 

Railroads, mileace of, oommunicatinc directly with Chioaco 166 

Constructed and in operation in the United States, number of miles of 166, 167 

Receipts and shipments of flour and cnun by, at Chioaco 2, 8 

Receipts and shipments of flour and wheat by, at Chioaco 6 

Receipts and shipments of com and oats by, at Chioaco 10 

Receipts and shipments of rye and barley by, at Chioaco 16 

Receipts and shipments of hoc products other than lard by, in Chioaco 43 

Receipts and shipments of lard and fresh meats by, at Chicaco 42 

Receipts and shipments of seeds, by at Chicaco 01, 02 

Receipts and shipments of hides and wool by, at Chioaco 06 

Receipts and shipments of lumber and ■hingi— by, at Chioaco. 00 

Ranee of prices for flour, in Chioaco, weekly 7 

' F(ff wheat in store, in Chioaco, weekly 8 

* For Contract wheat, at Chioaco, monthly, for a series of years 

* For com and oats, in Chioaco, weekly 11 

* For No. 2 and Standard oats, at Chioaco, monthly, for a series of years 18 

* For No. 2 oom, in Chioaco, monthly, for a series of years. 12 

' For rye and barley, in store and by sample, in Chioaco, weekly 17 

* For oattle, hoes and sheep, at Chioaco, weekly 48 

* For salt and seeds, at Chicaco, weekly 08 

* For hides, at Chioaco. 07 

* For coal and coke, at Chicaco 04 

* For hay, at Chicaco. 98 



282 



FAOB 

Range of prices for lumber, etc., at Chioago, tri<monihly 100 

* * For butter, cheese and eggs, at Chicago, weekly 108 

* * For cotton seed oil, tallow and grease at Chipago, for a series of years 87-40 

* * For beans and potatoes, at Chioago. weekly 04 

' ' For iron and steel, at Chicago 119-120 

Rates for inspecting and weighing grain, provisions, etc 85, 30 

* For storage of grain in Chioago elevators 38 

Real estate in Chicago, valuation of, for taxation, for a series of years 163 

Receipts of flour, grain, etc.. at New York, monthly 171 

* Of flour and grain, at New Orleans, monthly 170 

' Of flour and grain, at principal river and lake ports 178 

* Of grain, at Chicago, by crops 4 

* Of flour and wheat, at Chicago, by routes and by months 5 

* Of flour and wheat, in Chicago, by crops. 6 

* Of com and oats, at Chicago, by routes and by months 10 

* Of rye and barley, at Chioago, by routes and by months 10 

* Of flour and grain, in Chicago, for a series of yean 18 

* Of flour and grain, in Chicago, weekly 88 

* Of hogs, at Chicago, by routes and by months 40 

* Of hog products, other than lard, at Chioago, by routes and by months 48 

* Of cattle and sheep, at Chicago, by routes and by months 41 

* Of lard and fresh meats, at Chicago, by routes and by months 48 

* Of hogs and cattle, at Chicago, for a series of years 44 

* Of seeds, at Chioago, by routes and by months 01, 08 

* Of hides and wool, at Chicago, by routes and by months (Ml 

* Of potatoes and hay, at Chioago, by routes and by months 08 

* Of lumber and shingles, at Chicago, by routes 00 

* Of butter and cheese, at Chicago, by routes and by months 101 

* Of eggs, at Chioago, for a series of years 108 

* Of various commodities, at Chicago 108 

* Of various commodities, at Chioago, for a series of years 104 

' At Chicago and South Chioago, by lake 128. 188 

Rotterdam, freights for grain, flour and provisions from Chicago to 108 

Roumania, import duties on wheat in 204 

Rules governing the inspection of grain in Chioago 28-83 

Russian vessel tonnage engaged in the foreign oommeroe of the United States. 144 

* Exports of wheat and corn 140, 147 

* Import duties on wheat 204 

Rye. exi>orts of the United States, by crops and calendar years 180 

* Exi>orts of, to Euroi>e, for a series of years 152 

* Receipts and exports of, at New York, monthly 171 

* Crop of, in Illinois, for a series of years. 183 

* Crops of Illinois 170, 190, 191 

' Crops of the United States, by states 170 

* Crops of the world 181 

* Receipts of, at Ban Francisco 109 

' Exports of, from the principal Atlantio ports, weekly 154 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chioago 2, 3 

* Receipts of, at Chioago. by crops 4 

* Receipts and shipments of. at Chicago, by routes and by months 10 

* In store and by sample, range of prices of, in Chioago, weekly 17 

* Reoeipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 18, 19 

* Inspection of, in Chicago 37 

* In store, in Chicago, weekly, for two years 20, 21 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chioago, weekly 22, 23 

* Viflible supply of, weekly, for two years, in the United States and Canada 24, 25 

* Eastbound shipments of. from Chicago, by rail 68 

* Daily prices for cash and future deliveries of, at Chicago 02-85 

* Range of cash prices for, monthly 90 

* Exports of, from Chicago, by lake 120 

' Shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 122-128 



283 

FAOB 

^AINT Mary's Falls eanal, amount of eommeroe through, for two years 100 

Salt, inioes of, at Chicago, weekly 08 

* Reoelpto and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 108 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chioago, by rail 00 

* Beeeipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 104, 106 

' Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 122, 128 

San Franoiseo, leoeipte of domestic products, from all sources at 100 

* Exports of flour and grain from 100 

' Vessel tonnage of 145 

SeandinaTian irBssiil tonnage engaged In the foreign commerce of the United States 144 

Scotland, imports of flour and grain into, for the past five years 218 

Seeds, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 01, 02 

* Prices of, at Chicago, weekly 08 

* Exports of , from Chicago, by lake 120 

Sheep, receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 41 

' Bangs of prices of, at Chicago, weekly 48 

* Number and value of. In the United Stotes. 107 

ShingJes, stocks of. In Chicago, on January 1st, for a series of years 00 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 00 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 00 

* Prices of, by vessel eargo, at Chicago, bi-monthly 100 

' Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, for a series of years 104, 106 

' Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by lake. 122, 128 

Shipments of flour and grain, from New Orleans, monthly 170 

* Of flour and grain, eastbound, from Chicago, by raiL 68 

* Of flour and wheat from Chicago, by routes and by months 8 

' Of oom and oats from Chicago, by routes and by months. 10 

* Of rye and barley from Chicago, by routes and by months 10 

* Of flour and grain from Chicago, for a series of years 10 

* Of flour and grain from Chicago, weekly 28 

* Of hogs from Chicago, by routes and by months. 40 

' Of hog products other than lard, from Chicago, by routes and by months 48 

* Of cattle and sheep from Chicago, by routes and by months. 41 

* Of lard and fresh meats from Chicago, by routes and by months 42 

* Of hogs and cattle from Chicago, for a series of years 44 

* Of seeds from Chicago, by routes and by months 01, 02 

* Of hides and wool from Chicago, by routes and by months 06 

* Of potatoes and hay from Chicago, by routes and by months 08 

* Of lumber and shingles from Chicago, by routes 00 

* Of butter and cheese from Chicago, by routes and by months 101 

* Of eggi from Chicago, for a series of years 102 

* Of various commodities from Chicago 103 

* Of various commodities from Chicago, for a series of years 106 

* Of various commodities eastbound from Chicago, by rail 68-01 

' By niinois and Michigan canal 188 

« From Chicago and South Chicago, by lake 122-128 

* By lake, from Chicago 128 

* Of wheat and com from various countries, weekly 140, 147 

Short-rib sides, daily prices for cash and future deliveries of, at Chicago 82-86 

* * monthly cash prices of , at Chicago. 00 

* ' Stock of, in Chicago, for the past eight years 110 

SQver, English prices of, for the past two seasons 208 

South Chicago, receipts and shipments at, by lake 128 

Spanish vessel tonnage engaged in the foreign commerce of the United States 144 

' ImiMjrt duties on wheat 202 

Speculative articles, daily current i>rices of, at Chicago 02-88 

State Banks of Chicago, condition of the 114 

Btearine, monthly range of prices for, at Chicago, for a series of years 87-88 

* Esstbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 61 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 103 

Steel, range of prices for, at Chicago 110, 120 

Stettin, freights for flour and provisions from Chicago to 108 



284 

TAau 

fltookholm, freight for flour and proTisiona from Chieago to 106 

Stocks of Short-rib Aides in Chiosgo, for the iMSt eight years 110 

* ' Of contract pork and lard, in Chicago, for tiie past ten years 110 

* Of flour in Chicago, monthly, for seven srears 4 

* Of grain in store at Chicago, weeldy, for the past two years 20, 21 

* Of contract wheat in store at Chicago, monthly, for dz years 20 

* Of provisions in Chicago 57 

* Of mess pork in store at Chicago, monthly, for five years 57 

* Of prime steam lard in store at Chicago, monthly, for five years 57 

* Of provimons in Chicago for five years 54-56 

* Of provisions in Liverpool 201 

fit. Louis, pork packing in, for a series of years 45 

* Flour and grain receipts for five years 178 

Storage capacity of Chicago elevators 38^ 30 

Sweden, import duties on wheat in. 204 

Switserland, import duties on wheat in 204 



Tallow, cash prices of, at Chicago, weekly 40-87-^0 

* Monthly range of prices for, at Chicago, for a series of years 87. 00 

* Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail 61 

* Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes 106 

* ReodptB and shipments of, at Chicago, by lake 122, 123 

Tariff duties of the United States 206 

Taxation, valuation of property in Illinois, for a series of years 162 

' Valuation of real estate and personal property in Chicago, for a series of years. 168 

Taxes levied in Chicago on real estate and personal property, for a series of srears 168 

Tennessee, number of hogs packed in, during the past six regular seasons 52, 63 

Texas, number of hogs packed in, during the past six regular seasons 52-68 

Timothy seed, monthly cash prices of, in Chicago 06 

Tobacco crop of United States, by states 178 

Toledo grain receipts for five years. 178 

Tonnage of vessels engaged in the foreign commerce of the United States 144 

* Of the merchant marine of tlie Umted States. 145 

* Of the principal European and American ports 145 

* Of vessels arriving and clearing in the Chicago District 124, 125 

* Of vessels arriving and clearing at Chicago and South Chicago 128 

* Of vessels and cargoes arriving and clearing at Chicago, for a series oi years. 126 

* Passing through St. Mary's Falls Canal, during the past two seasons 160 

Transportation of wheat and com from Chicago to New York, freight charges for the, for a 

series of years 108 

Turkey, import duties on wheat in 204 



U NITED KINGDOM, production and Imports of wheat and fiour, and population in the, 

for a series of years 211 

United Kingdom, imports of flour and grain into, for the past five years 212, 213 

United States, population of the 140 

Imports and exports of the, for a series of years 148 

Domestic exports of the, for the last three years 140 

Imports of merchandise into the, for the last three jrears 150, 151 

Exports of beef, hog products, cheese and butter from the 159 

Nationality of the vessel tonnage entered at the ports oi the 144 

Tonnage of the merchant marine of the 145 

Alien passengers and immigrants arrived in the, for a secies of years 141 

PubUo debt of the 142, 148 



285 



PAOB 

United States, erops of the 174-170 

' * Gnin exports, by oropa and srean 180 

* * Number of miles of railroad oonstnicted and in operation in the 166 

* * Farm animals in the 195-197 

* * Exports of hog products from the, to Franoe and Germany, for a series of years 161 

* • Tariff duties of the 203 

' * And Canada, visible supply of srain in the, for two years 24, 26 



VALUATION of property in lUinois, for taxation, 'or a aeries of years 162 

Value of grain erops in Illinois, for a aeries of years 183 

' Of hog products exported from the United States to Franoe and Germany, for a series 

of years 161 

* Of imported merchandise, warehoused at Chicago, monthly 131 

' Of foreign coins and currencies 214, 216 

Vessel toxmage, nationality of, entered at the ports of the United States 144 

Vessds, arrirala and clearances of, in the Chicago District 124, 126 

* Arriyala and clearances of, at Chicago, for a series of years 126 

* Built in the district of Chicago 127 

' Cargo, tonnage in Chicago, for a series of years 126 

* Lost during the year, belonging to the district of Chicago 127 

■ "Laid up" at Chicago 127 

* IJst of, owned in Chicago 129, 180 

Visible supply of grain in the United States and Canada, for two years 24, 26 

Visible supply of grain in the United States and Canada, monthly, for nine years 26, 27 



iMf ALES, imports of flour and grain into, for the past five years 213 

Warehouse registration, extracts from the rules adopted for the administration of the depart- 
ment of 34 

Weekly shipments, eastbound from Chicago, by rail 68-61 

• ■ By Lake, from Chicago 123 

Weight per bushel of grain and various oommodities in various states 194 

Weights and measures, foreign 202, 203, 216-218 

Weighing grsin, provisions, etc., rates for, in Chicago 35-36 

Wheat exports of the United States, by crop and calendar years 180 

Crops of the world 181, 182 

Exports to Europe, for a aeries of years 162-168 

Exports of, from Atlantic ports 153, 156-168 

Exports of, from the United States to various countries 168 

Exports of, from various countries 146 

Crops of the United States. 174, 175 

(Winter and spring), acreage and production of, few a series of years 194 

(Winter and spring), erops of the United States, by states. 174, 175 

£ Receipts and exports of, at New York, monthly 171 

Receipts and shipments of, at New Orleans 170 

Production and imports of, in the United Kingdom, for a series of years 211 

Crops of. in Illinois 183 

Raised and consumed in Illinois 184-185 

Receipts and exports of, at San Francisco 169 

English prices of 205 

Exports of, from the principal Atlantic ports, weekly 154 

London, prices of, and statbtios of imports and quantities, **on passage" 206, 207 

Range of prices of. in Liverpool, weekly 208, 209 

Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago 2, 8 

Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, by routes and by months 5 

In store at Chieago, range of priees for 8 



286 



9Ai 



Wlie«l, rooeipto oft by cropB, M Ghioi^ 

Cttirent prices of, at Chioaco, on the let and 16th of eaeh month, for aeven srean.. . 14 

Range ot cash prieee for, monthly IHM 

Receipta and ahipments of, at Chicago, for a eerieB of yean lS,Vk 

Inspection of, at Chicago 37 

In store, at Chicago, weekly, for two years 30^ 31 

Receipts and shipments of, at Chicago, weekly S2, S3 

Vudble supply of, weekly, for two years, in the United States and Canada 24, 26 

Vinble supply of, monthly, for nine years, in the United States and Canada. SA, 27 

Contract, stocks of, in Chicago, monthly, for six years 27 

Eastbound shipments of, from Chicago, by rail S8r 

Daily prices for cash and future deliveries of, at Chicago 82, 85 

I>Veight8 for the transportation of, from Chicago to New York, for a series of years 103 

Export of, from Chicago, by lake 128 

Lake and rail freight rates for, from Chicago to eastern points 108 

I>Veights for, by lake and Erie canal 107 

Transported by lUinois and Michigan canal 138^ 

Shipments of, from Chieago, by lake 123 

Wisconsin, number of hogs packed in, during the past six regular seasons 62, 83 

Wool, receipts and shipments of, at Chieago. by routes and by months 03 

* Eastbound sldpments of, from Chieago, by raO 80 

' Receipts and dupments of, at Chieago, for a series of years 104, 108 

* Receipts and shipments of. at Chicago, by lake 123, 123 



ACT OF INCORPORATION 



RULES, BY-LAWS AND REGULATIONS 



OF THE 



BOARD OF TRADE 



OF THE 



CITY OF CHICAGO 



ALSO 



RULES GOVERNING THE STATE INSPECTION OF GRAIN AS 

ESTABLISHED BY THE RAILROAD AND 
WAREHOUSE COMMISSION 



IN FORCE 

MAY 1, 1912 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAOS 

Act of Incorporation 6 

Objects of the Association 9 

Rule I. Government and Elections 10 

II. Duties of President 11 

III. Duties of Vice-President 12 

IV. Powers and Duties of the Board of Directors 12 

V. Duties of Secretary and Assistant Secretary 24 

VI. Duties of the Treasurer 24 

VII. Annual Meeting 26 

VIII. Committees of Arbitration and Appeals 26 

IX. Special Committees 27 

X. Membership and Assessment 27 

XI. Messengers 28 

XII. Visitors 29 

XIII. Complimentary Tickets 20 

XIV. Brokers, and Commission Rates 20 

XV. Appropriations 86 

XVI. Irregular Trading 36 

XVII. Smoking 36 

XVIII. Seal 36 

XIX. Quorum 36 

XX. Deposits for Security 36 

XXI. Regular Deliveries 40 

XXII. Rights of Parties on Contract 60 

XXIII. Failure to Deliver or Receive on Contracts 61 

XXIV. Provisions 61 

XXV. Sale of Provisions 64 

X XVI . Tares 68 

XXVII. Former Rules, Provisions in Regard to 68 

By-Laws 69 

Regulations Governing Inspection of Flotir. , 72 

Rules Governing Inspection of Grain (State Inspection) 78 

Regulations Governing Inspection of Provisions 88 



4 

PAOB 

Requirements as to Cutting and Packing of Hog Products 91 

Regulations Governing the Inspection of Flax Seeds 98 

Regulations for the Arbitration of Grass and Field Seeds 101 

Regulations Governing the Inspection of Hay 102 

Requirements for " Regular ** Grain Warehouse 104 

Regtdations Governing Grain Samplers 100 

Requirements for ** Regular" Provision Warehouse 109 

Regtdations Governing the Trade in Hops Ill 

Regulations Governing Clearing House 113 

Regulations Regarding Solicitors 116 

Regulations for the Weighing of Grain 117 

Regulations of the Custodian Department ^ 119 

Regulations of the Market Report Department 122 

Regulations for the Government of Messengers 123 

General Index 124 



LEGISLATIVE ACT TO INCORPORATE 



THE 



Board of Trade, Chicago. 



Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois^ represented in the 
General Assembly: 

Section 1. That the persons now composing the Board of Trade Oorpoimu 
of the City of Chicago, are hereby created a body politic and cor- 
porate, under the name and style of the "Board op Trade op the 
CiTT op Chicago," and by that name may sue and be sued, implead 
and be impleaded, receive and hold property and effects, real and per- 
sonal, by gift, devise or purchase, and dispose of the same by sale, 
lease, or otherwise (said property so held not to exceed at any *i^®5J^|!^ 
the sum of two hundred thousand dollars) ; may have a common seal, BeaL 
and alter the same from time to time; and make such Rules, Regu-po^^rto 
lations and By-Laws from time to time as they may think proper or ^2SJ*tiS^ 
necessary for the government of the corporation hereby created, not im By-Laws, 
contrary to the laws of the land. 

Sec. 2. That the Rules, Regulations and By-Laws of the said BSJSfatSSJT* 
existing Board of Trade shall be the Rules and By-Laws of the cor-^^By-La^ 
poration hereby created, until the same shall be regularly repealed gj^jji^^ 
or altered; and that the present officers of said Association, known ^'*"^**<^ 
as the "Board of Trade of the City of Chicago," shall be the officers 
of the corporation hereby created, tmtil their respective offices shall 
regularly expire or be vacated, or until the election of new officers 
according to the provisions hereof. 

Sec. 3. The officers shall consist of a President, one or moreOffioen. 
Vice-Presidents, and such other officers as may be determined upon 
by the Rules, Regulations, or By-Laws of said corporation. All of 
said officers shall respectively hold their offices for the length of time 
fixed upon by the Rules and Regulations of said corporation hereby 
created, and until their successors are elected and qualified. 

Sec. 4. The said corporation is hereby authorized to establish Rujaa. 
such Rules, Regulations and By-Laws for the management of their aS^E^.Lawa. 
business, and the mode in which it shall be transactCKl, as they may 
think proper. 

Sec. 5. The time and manner of holding elections and making j||[Bnner of 
appointments of such officers as are not elected, shall be established eiaetiana. 
by the Rules, Regulations and By-Laws of Jsaid corporation. 



Power to 
admit and 
«xpeL 

OommitteM of 
Arbitration 
and Appeala. 



Ezaoutiana 
npon award*. 



Bonda. 



Oathaof 
oflBoa. 



Suits upon 
bonds. 



gausen and 
weigbeiB. 



Gtrtificates, 
eridence of 
quantity, 
grade or 
quality. 



Emplojnnait 
of appointees 
not ooligatoiy. 



Knee. 

Shall not 
ezoeed fire 
doUari. 



Sbc. 6. Said corporation shall have the right to admit or expel 
such persons as they may see fit, in manner to be prescribed by the 
Rules, Regulations and By-Laws thereof. 

Sbc. 7. Said corporation may constitute and appoint Committees 
of Reference and Arbitration, and Committees of Appeals, who shall 
be governed by such rules and regulations as may be prescribed in the 
Rules, Regulations or By-Laws for the settlement of such matters 
of difference as may be voluntarily submitted for arbitration by 
members of the Association, or by other persons not members 
thereof; the acting chairman of either of said committees, when 
sitting as arbitrators, may administer oaths to the parties and wit- 
nesses, and issue subpcenas and attachments, compelling the attend- 
ance of witnesses, the same as justices of the peace, and in like manner 
directed to any constable to execute. 

Sec. 8. When any submission shall have been made in writing, 
and a final award shall have been rendered, and no appeal taken 
within the time fixed by the Rules or By-Laws,Sthen, on filing such 
award and submission with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, an execu- 
tion may issue upon such award as if it were a judgment rendered 
in the Circuit Court, and such award shall thenceforth have the force 
and effect of such a judgment, and shall be entered upon the judgment 
docket of said court. 

Sbc. 9. It shall be lawful for said corporation, when they shall 
think proper, to receive and require of and from their officers, whether 
elected or appointed, good and sufficient bonds for the faithfuljdis- 
charge of their duties and trusts; and the President or Secretary is 
hereby authorized to administer such oaths of ofiBce as may be pre- 
scribed in the By-Laws or Rules of said corporation. Said bonds 
shall be made payable and conditioned as prescribed by the RulesTor 
By-Laws of said corporation, and may be sued and the moneys col- 
lected and held for the use of the party injured, or such other use as 
may be determined upon by said corporation. 

Sec. 10. Said corporation shall have power to appoint one or 
more persons, as they may see fit, to examine, measure, weigh, gauge, 
or inspect flour, grain, provisions, liquor, lumber, or any other articles 
of produce or traffic commonly dealt in by the members of said cor- 
poration; and the certificate of such person or inspector as to the 
quality or quantity of any such article, or their brand or mark upon 
it, or upon any package containing such article, shall be evidence 
between buyer and seller of the quantity, grade or quality of the 
same, and shall be binding upon the members of said corporation, or 
others interested, and requiring or assenting to the employment of 
such weighers, measurers, gangers, or inspectors; nothing herein 
contained, however, shall compel the employment, by any one, of 
any such appointee. 

Sec 11. Said corporation may inflict fines upon any of its mem- 
bers, and collect the same, for breach of its Rules. Regulations, or 
By-Laws; but no fine shall exceed five dollars. Such fines may be 
collected by action of debt, before a justice of the peace, in the name 
of the corporation. 



Sbc. 12. Said corporation shall have no power or authority to I'l^tation of 
do or carry on any business excepting such as is usual in the manage- ^ 
ment of boards of trade or chambers of commerce, or as provided in 
the foregoing sections of this bill. 

WM. R. MORRISON, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

JOHN WOOD, 

Speaker of the Senate* 
Approved February 18, 1859: 

WM. H. BISSELL. 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ) 

STATB OP ILLINOIS. ) 

I, O. M. Hatch, Secretary of State of the State of Illinois, do ObrUfloato. 
hereby certify that the foregoing is a true copy of an enrolled law 
now on file in my office. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and 
[sBAL.] affixed the great Seal of State, at the city of Springfield, this 
seventh day of March, a. d. 1859. 

O. M. HATCH, 
Secretary of State^ 



\ 



RULES AND BY-LAWS 



OF THE 



Board of Trade of the City of Chicago 



IN FORCE MAY 1, 1912 



OBJECTS. 



The objects of the Association are: To maintain a Commercial Pn^mbk. 
Exchange; to promote uniformity in the customs and usages of mer- 
chants; to inculcate principles of justice and equity in trade; to facili- 
tate the speedy adjustment of business disputes; to acquire and to 
disseminate valuable commercial and economic information; and, 
generally, to secure to its members the benefits of co-operation in the 
furtherance of their legitimate pursuits. 

In accordance with the franchises conferred by its Charter, and 
to accomplish the objects sought by the Association in its organiza- 
tion, 

Thb Board op Tradb op thb Citt op Chicago has adopted, for 
its direction and government, the following Rules and By-Laws: 



GENERAL RULES. 



RULE I. 

GOVERNMENT AND ELECTIONS. 

STthTSS-* Section 1. The government of the Board of Trade of the City of 

eiAtian. Chicago, and the control and management of its Real Estate (including 

all of the authority and power heretofore vested in the Board of Real 
How rMtad. Estate Managers), are hereby vested in a President, two Vice-Presi- 
dents, and fifteen Directors, who, including the President and Vice- 
§?^^^J^_ Presidents, shall be known as the Board of Directors, all of whom 
Qu^ificatioma. shall have been members of the Association for at least one year next 
preceding their election. The President, one Vice-President, and 
five Directors shall be elected annually. The President shall hold 
Term of office, his office for the term of one year, or until his successor is elected and 
qualified; the Vice-Presidents, in like manner, shall hold their offices 
for the term of two years, and the Directors, in like manner, for the 
term of three years. Ten members of the Board of Directors shall 
Quorum. constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a less number 

may adjourn from time to time, to any fixed date preceding the next 
regular meeting of said Board. 
S?h??*«**' ®' Sec. 2. There shall also be elected by the members of the Asso- 
•nd Appeals, ciation a Committee of Arbitration and a Committee of Appeals, con- 
sisting of ten members each, who shall hold their respective offices for 
Term of office, the period of two years. Five members of each conmiittee shall be 
QuAUfloationa. elected annually. The qualifications for election to either of these 
committees shall be the same as for the office of Director. No person 
shall, at the same time, be a member of both committees. 

A™¥*^ Sec. 3. The annual election for all elective officers not otherwise 

eleotion. 

provided for, shall be held in the Exchange Hall on the first Monday 
after the second day of January in each year, between the hours of 
ten o'clock A. M. and two o'clock P. M., and all voting shall be by 

m«St^*?offi • l'^^ Australian Ballot. The official term of all officers shall commence 

tenn. on the Monday succeeding their election. 

Requirements Sec. 4. For President and Vice-Presidents, a majority of all the 

o ane ion. ^^^^g ^^g^ shall be necessary to a choice; but for all other elective 
officers a plurality shall elect. 

Failure to Sec. 5. In case of failure to elect any officer voted for on the first 

trial, another election, in like manner, shall be held on the succeeding 

Subsequent (j^y, and if there shall again be a failure to elect, then, upon a third 
trial, held in like manner, on the day following, a plurality shall elect. 

Failure to Sec 6. If from any cause an election of officers is not had at the 

yacan'des. regular annual election, or in case of the death, resignation or removal 
of the President, either of the Vice-Presidents, Directors or members 
of either of the Committees of Arbitration or Appeals, it shall be in 
the power of the Association to fill such vacancies for the remainder 

Notice, how of the official term at any regular or special election thereafter; prth 

published. vfded, notice of said special election shall have been announced on 
'Change at least three days immediately preceding such election. 

10 



(Boua I.-II.] 



11 



No ballot shall be counted for Directors at any election of Directors Ballots at 
which does not contain as many names of the regularly nominated 
candidates as there are directors to be elected at that election ; and no 
ballot shall be counted for members of the Committee of Arbitration 
which does not contain as many names of the regularly nominated 
candidates as there are members of the Committee of Arbitration to 
be elected at that election ; and no ballot shall be counted for members 
of the Committee of Appeals which does not contain as many names 
of the regularly nominated candidates as there are members of the 
Committee of Appeals to be elected at that election. It shall be the 
duty of the Secretary to have this portion of the Rules printed on all 
ballots used at any such election. 

Sec. 7. It shall be the duty of the President, prior to any election Tellers of 
to be held by the Association, to appoint or cause to be appointed a ©lection, 
sufficient number of tellers, who shall have charge of the ballot boxes Dutiee. 
and poll lists of the Association, and who shall receive consecutively, 
and place the same in the ballot box, all ballots of members who shall 
be in good and regular standing, who shall have paid all dues and 
assessments. They shall keep a record of all members voting, and 
opposite each name shall place the number of the ballot deposited by 
said member. Three of the tellers shall constitute a quorum for Qimwim 
receiving and recording the votes. No ballot box shall be opened, 
nor shall any votes be counted, except in the presence of at least four 
of their number. They shall make all returns in writing to the Presi- Returns in 
dent of the Association, duly signed by at least four of their number, '"*'"*«• 
and the Secretary shall preserve all the ballots for the period of at Preservatian 
least one month, for further examination, if the same shaU be ordered ^ 
by the Board of Directors, to verify the correctness of the returns of 
said tellers. 

Sec. 8. In the hearing or trial of any case or controversy before Disqualifiea- 
the Board of Directors, or before any committee of the Association, Direoton or 
no Director and no member of any such committee shall serve or act "^^^"^ 
m such hearing or trial who has any financial interest or concern in 
the result of such hearing or trial, or who shall be a business partner 
of any party thus interested. 

RULE II. 

DUTIES OP THE PRESIDENT. 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the President to act as general S^JJJJ'^ 
executive officer of the Association and of the Board of Directors, 
respectively; to preside at all meetings of either of these bodies, and to l^^^Su' 
direct the proceedings of each in accordance with the Rules, By-Laws 
and Rules of Order governing the same; he shall have power to call To oall tpeoial 
special meetings of the Board of Directors and of the Association; and " "'^' 
upon the written request of twenty-five members, he shall call special 
meetings of the Association, which shall be done by causing notice of Objeot to be 
the same to be publicly announced on 'Change; provided, such request 
shall state the object for which such meeting is to be called, and is 
made at least three business days preceding the said meeting. 

Sbc. 2. It shall be the duty of the President to preserve order and To pneenris 
proper business decorum in the Exchange and other rooms of the^ 



12 



[fimMm n.-in.-iy.] 



Penalty for 

diforderly 

oonduotk 



Power to fill 
▼aoancies and 
to api>oint 
eommitteea. 



Flnt and 
Second Vioe- 
Presidents. 



Reepeetiye 
duties. 



Bnsmees and 

eonoemSf 
how managed. 



^pointment 
oloflSoers and 
employes. 



Gbmpensation 
of omoeiB and 
appointees 
Tenns of 
appointed 
offioen. 



Appointments 
revocable. 



Oath of^offioe. 



Stoted 
meetings of 
Direotoih. 



Association, and in the corridors, halls, entrances and other parts of 
the building of the Association; and, in case any member, or other 
person, shall be guilty of any disorderly, boisterous or offensive con- 
duct in or about the Exchange or other rooms of the Association, or 
in or about the corridors, halls, entrances or other parts of the build- 
ing of the Association, he shall be for that offense suspended from 
admission to the Exchange rooms of the Association for such time as 
may be determined by the President, subject, however, to appeal to 
the Board of Directors; but pending such appeal the suspension shall 
not be enforced. 

^. ,/:^ Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the President to temporarily fill 
any vacancy which may occur in any appointive office of the Asso- 
ciation, and to appoint all committees whose appointment is not 
otherwise provided for. 

RULE III. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS DUTIES. 

Section 1. The Vice-President serving upon the last year of his 
official term shall be the first Vice-President, and the Vice-President 
serving upon the first year of his official term shall be the second 
Vice-President. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Presidents, respec- 
tively, in this order, to perform the duties of President, in case of his 
absence or^disability. 

RULE IV. 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

' Section 1. All the business and financial concerns of the Asso- 
ciation shall be managed and conducted (in accordance with the 
Charter, Rules, Regulations and By-Laws of the Association) by or 
under the direction of the Board of Directors. 

Sec 2. The Board of Directors shall, on the Tuesday succeeding 
each annual election, or as soon thereafter as may be practicable, 
appoint a Secretary, an Assistant Secretary, a Treasurer and such 
Inspectors, Gangers, Weighers, Measurers, and other^ officers, clerks, 
assistants and employes as they may consider necessary for the pur- 
poses of the Association, and they may establish such regtdations for 
the'direction and government of such appointees as they may][ think 
proper; and may fix their compensation, and determine by whom the 
same shall be paid. The term of office of all such appointees shall 
commence on the Tuesday succeeding their appointment, or at such 
other time as the Board of Directors may designate, and shall con- 
tinue for one year, or until their successors are appointed and assume 
their duties; but all such appointments shall be revocable at the will 
and pleasure of said Board. 

Sec. 3. The Board of Directors shall require of all apx>ointees an 
oath to well and faithfully perform all and singular the duties of their 
offices, and tnay at its discretion require a good and sufficient bond to 
secure such performance. . 

Sec 4. The Board of Directors shall hold stated meetings every 
Tuesday, except when Tuesday shall fall upon a legal holiday, in 
which case the meeting for that day may be omitted. 



(Buia IV.1 13 

Sec. 5. The Board of Directors shall cause to be announced onAnnounoe- 
'Change all appointments of public concern which they shall make, appointmente 
and all revocations of the same; and at every annual meeting they gJ^J[*^''°**" 
shall make a full report of receipts and expenditures, properly clas- 
sified, and an exhibit of the financial affairs, property and general con- '^j'Sl^tSSii 
dition of the Association. They shall, previous to the annual meeting ezpendUoTM. 



of the Association, assess on each of the members of the Association 
an amount which, in their judgment, will be sufBcient, in the aggre- 
gate, to meet all estimated expenditures of the Association for the 
ensuing fiscal year, and they shall, at the annual meeting, report to 
the Association the pro rata amount so assessed. 

Sec. 6. The Board of Directors shall provide suitable and con-^o*'™*' 
venient Exchange and other necessary rooms and offices for the pur- 
pose of the Association, and they shall cause the same to be kept in 
a comfortable, neat and orderly condition. They shall on all business 
days cause the Exchange Hall to be open, set apart and devoted to 
the purposes of a general exchange during the hours for regular trad- 
ing, as provided by Section 1 of Rule XVI . They shall have jwwer 
to make such Rules and Regulations as they may deem necessary in Power to 
regard to the use of the Exchange rooms, and the other rooms, offices, Srooma!''* 
corridors, halls, entrances and other parts of the building of the Asso- 
ciation, and to enforce the same by such penalties as they may prescribe. 

Sec. 7. When any member of this Association has been duly con- Oauaei for 
victed of failure to comply with the terms of any business obligation, ■"■P*""* 
or with the award of any Committee of Arbitration or Committee of 
Appeals, made in conformity with the rules and regulations of this 
Association, he shall be suspended from all privileges of the Board of 
Trade of the City of Chicago until all his outstanding obligations to 
members of the said Board of Trade shall have been settled, when he 
may, upon application to the Board of Directors, and upon stating it^nstate- 
under oath that he has settled all such outstanding obligations, be™®"*' 
reinstated. Notice of all applications for reinstatement shall be posted ApplioatioDs 
upon a properly designated bulletin in the Exchange Hall for at least Sj,Jf "*****•" 
fifteen (15) days prior to the hearing of such application by the Board 
of Directors. 

Such reinstatement shall be a bar to any further discipline by the A bar to 
Board of Directors of the said Board of Trade on account of claims SjJjSj ***** 
against such member maturing prior to his reinstatement. 

Sec. 8. Any member of the Association who shall be interested or Dealing in 
associated in business with, or who shall act as the representative of, ^^**^^ 
or who shall knowingly execute any order or orders for the account of 
any organization, firm or individual engaged in the business of dealing 
in differences on the fluctuations in the market price of any conmiod- 
ity or corporate stock — ^without a bona fide purchase and sale of the 
article for an actual delivery; or who shall be a member of, or shall, 
in his own behalf, or as agent, directly or indirectly make, execute, or 
give any orders for a trade or transaction in or upon any bucketshop 
or any so-called exchange, wherein is conducted or permitted the busi- 
ness aforesaid, or who shall knowingly accept, either directly or in- 
directly, from any member of an/ so-called exchange, wherein is 



14 



(Rnu iy.| 



conducted or permitted the business aforesaid, any orders for trades 
or transactions to be executed in the Exchange Hall of this Associa- 
tion, shall be deemed guilty of unmercantile conduct.which renders him 
unworthy to be a member of the Association; and upon complaint to 
and conviction thereof by the Board of Directors, he shall be expelled 
from membership in the Association. Any member who shall, directly 
or indirectly, become or continue a member of, or in his own behalf or 
as agent make any trade upon, or otherwise contribute to the main- 
tenance of, or accept any orders to be executed upon the Exchange of 
this Association from any member of a market or exchange in the city 
of Chicago, permitting the distribution of its quotations covering the 
commodities dealt in upon the Exchange of this Association, without 
imposing and enforcing prohibitions upon the use of such quotations 
in bucketshops, such as are imposed by this Association upon its quo- 
Ponal^. tations, shall, upon complaint to, and conviction thereof by the Board 

of Directors, be expelled from membership in this Association. 
^^•"■JJ?** ^ All orders received by any member of this Association, firm or cor- 
opea market, poration doing business upon the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, 
to buy or sell for future delivery any of the articles or commodities 
dealt in upon the floor of the Exchange (except when in exchange for 
cash property) must be executed in the open market in the Exchange 
Hall during the hours of regular trading, and under no circumstances 
shall any member, firm or corporation assume to have executed any 
of such orders or any portion thereof by taking the trades, or any por- 
tion of any of them, for their own account, either directly or indirectly, 
in their own name or that of an employe, broker or other member of 
the Association. Any member convicted of violation of this rule by 
the Board of Directors shall be expelled. 

[5^3 .fi When any member, or any firm of which a member of this Associa- 
tion is a member, or any corporation of which a member is an officer, 
whether acting as principal or as agent, shall either directly or in- 
The Mnding of directly make or execute, or cause or permit to be forwarded for exe- 
^tri^eex^ *** cution, upon any exchange or board of trade located outside of the 



0^.8© where City of Chicago, an order for a so-called "put" or "call," or for any 
oiSed^'puts'/ contract respecting the purchase or sale of grain or provisions for 
"^j^^ed."©" future delivery, when by the rules, regulations, customs or usages of 



Le majdng of such exchange or board of trade it is provided or permitted, or where 
eonttaots to be 



fulfiUed'by'de^ the parties to such "put," "call" or contract contemplate that such 
Ohirago ware- "p^t," "call" or contract may be fulfilled or satisfied by the delivery 
bf"''*hSttS** ^^^^ warehouse receipt or receipts issued by a warehouse located in 
Chicago, such member, or such member of such firm, or such officer of 
suchjcorporation, shall be deemed guilty of conduct which renders him 
unfit for membership in this Association, and upon conviction thereof 
he shall be expelled.| 
Tiolation of SI Sbc. 9. When any member of the Association shall be guilty of 
ui a willfidlviolation of any business contract or obligation and shall 
neglect or refuse to equitably and satisfactorily adjust and settle the 
same, or when any member shall willfully neglect or refuse to comply 
promptly with the award of any committee of arbitration or commit- 
tee of appeals, rendered in conformity with the rules, regulations and 



EuialV.J 15 

by-laws of the Association, he shall be suspended from all the privileges 
of this Association until such contract or obligation is satisfactorily 
adjusted and settled, or such award is performed or complied with. 

When any member shall be guilty of improper conduct of a per- 2«jS2? how 
sonal character in any of the rooms of the Association, or shall violate imniahable. 
any of the rules, regulations or by-laws of the Association or shall be 
guilty of any dishonorable conduct, for which a specific penalty has 
not been provided, he shall be suspended by the Board of Directors 
from all the privileges of membership for such period as in their dis- 
cretion the gravity of the offense committed may warrant. When any 
member shall be guilty of making or reporting any false or fictitious 
purchase or sale, or where any member shall be guilty of an act of bad 
faith, or any attempt at extortion or of any dishonest conduct, he shall 
be expelled by the Board of Directors. Or when a member shall, 
either in the Exchange Building or elsewhere, contract to give to him- 
self or another the option to sell or buy any of the articles dealt in on 
this Exchange in violation of any criminal statute of this State, he 
shall forfeit the right to have said contract enforced under the rules of 
this Association. 

Any member suspended from the privileges of the Association shall 2?J5J"^°"^ 
not be allowed to trade or do any business upon the floor of the Ex- 
change in his own name, either through a broker or employe. 

Any member of this Association trading or offering to trade, either Name of mw 
as a broker or employe, giving the name of a suspended member, shall fJJ «S Sw. 
be considered as having violated a rule of the Association, and shall be 
suspended for not less than thirty days nor more than six months. 

A majority of a quorum sitting at a regular or adjourned meeting y^j^^^. 



of the Board of Directors shall be necessary to suspend, and an aflSr- *^i["*''*I[^Jjj 
mative vote of at least twelve members of the Board of Directors shall 
be necessary to expel. 

Sec. 10. No member of the Association nor the firm or corpora- Tn^jXnj^^ 
tion with which he may be identified or associated shall in any case 
trade, accept or clear trades for or on behalf of any employe of another 
member, firm or corporation, where the name of the member, firm or 
corporation with whom said employe is employed appears in the 
transaction. 

Sbc. 11. No member of this Association is allowed under any cir- ^^ m^ianh^ 
cumstances to be both principal and agent in any transaction in any JHirfJiif*^H 
of the commodities dealt in under the rules of this Board. Further- 
more, no member of this Association in any transaction in any of the 
commodities dealt in under the rules of this Board shall allow himiM>lf 
directly or indirectly, either by his own act or by the act of an em- 
ploye or of a broker or other member of the Association, to be placed 
in the position of agent for both seller and buyer. 

This section shall not apply in case of exchange of cash property. 

Sbc. 12. Upon the conviction by the Board of Directors of any 
member of the Association, firm or corporation of the violation <^ 
Sections 10 and 11 of this rule, he or they shall be suspended from all 
the privileges of the Association for a period of not less than one year, 
and for a second offense shall be expelled. 



16 



EEnuIV.] 



|^™JJ^*J»' Sbc. 13. In any investigation or trial before the Board of Direc- 
booLi, «to. tors, or before any other duly constituted committee or other tribunal 
of the Association, if any member who shall have been cited by the 
President, or the Chairman of any duly constituted committee or other 
tribunal of the Association to appear, testify and produce his books 
and papers, shall neglect or refuse to so appear and testify or to pro- 
duce his books and papers, or, if testif 3dng, shall refuse to answer any 
question which may by a majority vote of the said Board of Directors, 
committee or other tribunal, be declared proper and pertinent to the 
case in hearing, he shall be subject to suspension by the said Board 
of Directors from all privileges of the Association, for such period as 
said Board may determine; action under this section may be had on 
the report in writing of any such committee or other tribunal, in case 
the contempt shall occur before it. It is hereby x>rovided that no wit- 
ness shall be compelled to answer any question which shall criminate 
himself; nor shall any testimony be admitted which, in the opinion of 
the conmiittee or other tribunal, is irrelevant^to the case in hearing. 

BdnirtntmiMint Ssc. 14. A suspended member may be reinstated by a majority 
vote of a quorum of the Board of Directors. A suspended member 
shall not be reinstated during the time for which he was suspended, 
unless it shall subsequently be proven that he was suspended upon 
false testimony, or in case satisfactory evidence is presented of error 
in the decision of the Board of Directors as to his guilt of the charges 
upon which he was suspended, and notice of the application for re- 
hearing of all such cases must be posted upon the bulletin of the 
Exchange for one week prior to sucli rehearing. 

Expelled !^Sbc. 15. An expelled member shall not be readmitted to member- 

JJJ3^JJ]j^J°^ ship except upon payment of the regular initiation fee and annual 

assessment, and upon satisfactory evidence that he is a fit person for 

Vote neooH membership in the Association, and then only upon an affirmative vote 

JJ2^^ of fat least twelve members of the Board of Dire<5tors; provided, such 

vote shall be had at a regular meeting at least one week succeeding a 

PioTisionto motion^ to" readmit ; provided, that in case it shall subsequently be 

? «cpu£oa!' proven that the member was expelled on false testimony, or in case 

satisfactory evidence is presented of error in the decision of the Board 

of Directors as to his guilt of the charges upon which he was expelled, 

he m ay be restored to membership, as provided by this section, without 

the payment of the initiation fee. 

jT 'Notice of the application for rehearing of all such cases must be 
posted upon the bulletin board of the Exchange for one week prior to 
such rehearing.^" 

Chaises to be " ^BC. 16. All charges made to the Board of Directors against any 
fai.wnting. member of the Association for any default, misconduct, or offense, 
shall be in writing, and in duplicate, and shall state the default, mis- 
How signed conduct or offense charged; and the same shall be signed by one or 
more members of the Association, by a business firm, one or more of 
whose members shall be a member of the Association, or by the Chair- 
man Jof a committee of the Association. 



(Btm IV.] 



17 



Sbc. 17. No member shall be censured, suspended or expelled Wr m infart i o n 
under this Rule, without an examination of the charges agamst him 
by the Board of Directors, nor without having an opportunity to be 
heard in his own defense. No examination shall take place until Notice of iiiaL 
notice has been served on the accused member, or his firm, if the 
charges apply to the firm, accompanied by a copy of the charges Oopy of 
against him or them, in writing. Such notice may be served upon*^****" 
the accused personally, by the Secretary or any of his assistants, or 
it may be left at or mailed to the accused at his ordinary place of 
business or residence; in either of which cases the notice shall be con- 8affiei«n«or off 
sidered sufficient, and the examination may proceed whether the 
accused is present or not. 

Sec. 18. It shall be the duty of the Board of Directors, in case 
any grave offense or act of dishonesty committed by any member 
involving the good name or dignity of the Association, or any act of 
dishonesty on the part of a member, shall come to their knowledge,' 
either by complaint or public report, to cause a preliminary or informal Invostisation 
investigation to be made by a committee of their number into the ^ 
truth or falsity of such complaint or report ; and if the said conmiittee, 
after investigation, shall deem any member guilty of such offense, they 
shall so report to the Board of Directors, with specific charges; where- 
upon the member thus implicated shall be notified to appear before 
the Board of Directors in manner as provided by Section 16 of this Puniabment if 
Rule, and if fotmd guilty, the said member shall be suspended or ex- •''■**"*•**• 
pelled, as hereinbefore provided. 

To facilitate the investigation of all cases under this rule, the 
Board of Directors, or any committee appointed to make the prelim- 
inary investigation, shall have power to call for persons and papers, Power to call 
and every member, firm or corporation connected with the matter boob and * 
under investigation may be required (imless it shall criminate him or p*p®"* 
them) to produce his, its or their books and records covering the mat- 
ters involved in the charges for examination by the Board of Directors 
or its conmiittee of investigation, and any member who or whose firm 
or corporation shall refuse to comply with this requirement shall be 
suspended from all the privileges of the Association until such require- 
ment shall be complied with. • ♦.^ 

Sec. 19. In investigations before the Board of Directors, or before Profeisional 
any committee of the Association, no party shall be]iallowed to befg^^^"*^ 
represented by professional counsel. 

Sec. 20. When a member against whom are pending no com- I^aohaxse in 
plaints or charges preferred by a member or the Association, or who ■^•'^*™p*^ 
is not under sentence of suspension, shall have been duly discharged 
from his legal responsibilities or debts by a cotirt of bankruptcy, he 
shall not thereafter be liable to discipline on account of such obliga- 
tions; provided, the institution of proceedings in bankruptcy shall in Piooeedinci 
nowise affect the action of the Board of Directors in matters of dis- **'^*™p*^' 
cipline brought before said Board before a final discharge in bank- 
ruptcy shall have been granted; nor shall a discharge in bankruptcy 
affect subsequent proceedings, in the way of discipline, before said Board . 
forimmoralor dishonest transactions, occurring prior to said discharge. pioee&i«t. 



w » 



* * 



* ^ * 



18 



[RulbIVJ 



fljjjdaidiof Sec. 21. It shall be the duty of the Board of Directors, as occa- 

sion may require, to fix and establish standards of grades or qualities 
for Flour, Grain, Provisions, Liquors, Lumber, and any other articles 
or commodities dealt in by the members of the Association: and the 

Oartlfioatet. certificate of any Inspector, Weigher, Measurer or Ganger, appointed 
by the said Board, as to the quality or quantity of any such articles, 
or his brand or mark upon it, or upon any package containing such 
articles, shall be evidence between buyer and seller of the quality, 
grade or quantity of the same, and shall be binding upon the mem- 
bers of the Association or others interested or requiring or assenting to 
the employment of such Inspectors, Gangers, Weighers or Measurers. 

Cufltodian shaU Sbc. 22. The Board of Directors is empowered to organize a 



■ion of all com- department to be designated "The Custodian Department of the 

mouiuOB to 

praflenreUen Board of Trade of the City of Chicago," and also to appoint the 

ofnllerfor «- * . 

purohaae necessary officers and employes m connection therewith, to specify 

pviioab 

the duties to be performed in the management of said department, 

and to establish such regulations for the conduct and government of 
said department as, in the judgment of the Board of Directors, shall 
best promote its efficiency. The term of office of all such appointees 
shall begin at such time as the Board of Directors may designate, and 
shall continue until successors are appointed and assume their duties; 
but all such appointments shall be revocable at the will and pleasure 
of said Board of Directors. The custodian of the department shall 
file a bond with sufficient sureties in such sum and subject to such 
conditions as may be deemed necessary by the Board of Directors. 
The said custodian, for the purpose of this rule, shall be deemed the 
agent of the seller to hold possession of any and all commodities 
placed in his care and control until the purchase price of the same is 
paid, and he shall not release said possession, except in accordance 
with the provisions of this section and the regulations established 
tmder its authority. Provided, however, that nothing in the said 
section, or the regulations passed in conformity thereto, shall be con- 
strued as a reservation of title by the seller to any and all commodities 
in the possession of the custodian, if, in the absence of this section, 
the agreement between parties, or the custom of trade shall contem- 
plate the transfer of title thereto to the buyer. 

Oinnisaftkm Sec. 23. The Board of Directors shall have power to organize a 

of SSSSk^'^ Department of Market Records and Reports, and to appoint the neces- 
sary officers and employes in connection therewith, to designate the 
work to be performed by the said Department, and to make all needful 



CBulbIV.] 



19 



Rules and Regulations to govern the same. The records and reports 
which may be prepared and compiled by the said Department shall 
be considered and treated as portions of the Official Records of the 
Association, and the said records or parts thereof may be disseminated 
in such manner and under such conditions and restrictions as may be 
prescribed by the Board of Directors. 

Whenever the market quotations of said Board are transmitted 
over any private wire, or wires, leased by, or running into the office cbaxge for 
of, any member of this Board, or any firm one of whose partners is a p"^^*® '"^ 
member, or any corporation entitled to any of the privileges of this 
Board, such member, firm or corporation shall pay to the Secretary 
of this Board, monthly, two dollars ($2.00) for each and every office 
outside of the City of Chicago into which any leased wire, or wires, 
run, and every such member, firm or corporation shall, from time to 
time, whenever requested by the Secretary, report to him in writing the 
number and location of his, their or its said offices; and upon the fail- 
ure of any such member, firm or corporation to make such report, or 
to pay any of the moneys herein provided, such member, or members, 
or the officers of any such corporation who are members, shall be sus- 
pended by the Board of Directors until this rule shall have been com- 
plied with. 

Sec. 24. It shall be the duty of the Board of Directors, upon the gtandxnc 
nomination of the President, to appoint such Standing Committees ^*°"''"***'"* 
from their own number as they may deem necessary. The Transpor- 
tation, Grain and Inspection Committees, for the purpose of having jnmpmMAtm 
the proper branches of trade represented, may be selected in part or ™"'*^^^''' 
wholly from the other members of the Association. All such com- 
mittees, however, shall be fully under the control of the said Board of 
Directors. The said Board of Directors shall, in like manner, appoint DeiaBatea to 
all delegates to the National Board of Trade, and all representatives BoanL 
to other deliberative gatherings in which the Association may be en- 
titled to a voice, and in which it may desire a representation; and such other i«pto- 
ddegates and representatives may be appointed wholly or in part from """^ ^^^ 
the membership of the Association not members of the Board of 
Directors. 

Sec. 26. The Board of Directors may employ such legal advice LggBi advioa. 
and assistance as they may deem necessary for the purpose^of the 
Association. 



20 



[Bin.Biy.1 



dinbility of 

pnaidixig 

offioen. 

Temponucy 
obainnan. 



Sec. 26. In case of absence or disability of the President and both 
Vice-Presidents, it shall^be the duty of the Board of Directors to elect 
from their number a temporary chairman, who, in addition to his 
duties as Chairman ol the Board of Directors, shall also temporarily 
perform all other duties devolving upon the President. 



Special meot- 
11101 of the 
AiMOoiation, 
how oallecL 

Poweci of 

■peoial 

mMiing. 



Sec. 27. The Board of Directors shall have power to call special 
meetings of the Association upon such notice and for such purpose as 
they may deem proper. All calls for special meetings of the Associa- 
tion shall state the specific object of such meetings, and no other busi- 
ness than that for which a special meeting was called shall be consid- 
ered at any such meeting, except by unanimous consent. 



Absence of 
Directon. 



Sec. 28. In case any member of that body shall absent himself 
from six consecutive regular meetings of the Board of Directors, with- 
out having been previously excused, or without communicating to the 
President, in writing, a good and sufficient excuse for his absence, or a 
resignation of his office, the Board of Directors shall declare the office 
of said Director vacant and may immediately order a special election 
by the Association to fill said vacancy. 



Special 
meetings of 
Directon. 



How called. 



Sufficient 
notice. 



Sec. 29. Special meetings of the Board of Directors may be con- 
vened by order of the President, or by written request of any five 
members of the said Board, addressed to the Secretary. Such meet- 
ings may be called by public notice announced on 'Change, or by ser- 
vice of personal or written notice by the Secretary, or by any of his 
assistants, upon the members of the said Board. A written notice left 
at the usual place of business of any member of the said Board of 
Directors shall be a sufficient notice in case of meetings called by 
service of personal or written notice. 



Statements 

lequixed of 

corporations 

enjoying 

Clearing 

House 

priirileges. 



Sec. 30. Any corporation applying for membership in the Clear- 
ing House of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, shall accom- 
pany such application with a statement of the affairs of such corpora- 
tion at that time, which statement shall show the amount of the capi- 
tal stock authorized by its charter, the amount of said capital stock 
which has been paid in cash, and shall give a financial Exhibit of the 
affairs of the corporation, which statement shall be swpm to by the 
President and Secretary thereof. Any corporation applying for mem- 
bership in the Clearing House of the Board of Trade of the City of 
Chicago may be admitted to such membership only upon reconunen- 
dation of the Clearing House Committee, in the exercise of its discre- 



(Rou IV.I 



21 



tion, and upon approval by at least ten afifirmative ballot votes of the 
Board of Directors, provided that three negative ballot votes are not 
cast against such corporation. Any corporation which now is, or 
which may hereafter become a member of the Clearing House of the 
Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, may, in the discretion of the 
Board of Directors, be suspended from the privileges of such member- 
ship upon the recommendation of the Clearing House Committee, after 
a proper hearing: provided such recommendation is approved by at 
least twelve affirmative votes of the Board of Directors. No corpora- 
tion shall be admitted to or have at any time the privileges of the 
Clearing House of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, unless the 
President and 'Secretary of such corporation shall both be members of 
this Association in good standing, and shall be the bona fide owners 
of a reasonable amount of the stock of such corporation. The Board 
of Directors shall require each and every corporation which has the 
privileges of the Clearing House of the Board of Trade to file in the 
office of the Secretary of the Board, on or before the fifth day of Janu- 
ary in each year, a statement of the affairs of such corporation upon 
the first day of said month, which statement shall show the amount 
of said capital stock which has been paid in cash, and shall give a 
financial exhibit of the affairs of the corporation, which statement shall 
be sworn to by the President and Secretary thereof. 

The Board of Directors may also require at any time during the 
year, such a statement from such corporation, and upon a petition 
asking for such statement as to any such corporation by twenty-five 
(25) members of the Association, shall require the same to be filed 
forthwith; such statement shall be open to inspection only to members 
of the Association. 

Whenever any such statement shall show that the capital stock 
of any corporation has been impaired or reduced in fair cash value 
below the amount named in its original application, the Board of 
Directors may, in its discretion, upon the recommendation of the 
Clearing House Committee, suspend such corporation from the privi- 
leges of the Clearing House, until such impairment has been made 
good ; provided such recommendation is approved by at least ten affirm- 
ative ballots of the Board of Directors. 

No firm, or individual, shall be admitted to the privileges of the 
Clearing House without the approval of the Board of Directors of the 
Board of Trade of the City of Chicago. Any firm, or individual, 
which now is or which may hereafter become a member of the Clear- 



22 



PlUUBlV. 



ing House of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago may, in the 
discretion of the Board of Directors, be suspended from the privileges 
of such membership upon the recommendation of the Clearing House 
Contmiittee, after a proper hearing, provided such recommendation is 
approved by at least twelve afiBrmative votes of the Board of Directors. 

ications ^° ^"'^ shall have, at any time, the privileges of the Clearing 

membuship in House of the Board of Trade, unless every member of such firm is a 
Clearing House member of this Association in good standing. 



IneolTfficj. 



Sbc. 31. When any member of this Association, knowing himself 
or the firm of which he is a partner, or the corporation of which he is 
President or Secretary, to be in an insolvent condition, shall make 
any contract on his own account, or on account of such firm or corpora- 
tion, under the rules of this Association, whereby pecuniary loss shall 
restdt to any other member, or to any|]firm or corporation entitled to 
transact business on this Exchange, he shall be suspended or expelled 
at the discretion of the Board of Directors; or, when any member of 
this Association, knowing himself, or the firm of which he is a partner, 
or the corporation of which he is President or Secretary, to be in an 
insolvent condition, shall accept on his own account, or on account of 
any such firm or corporation, any money or security or securities as 
margins from any customer on any trade or trades made under the 
ndes of this Board, whereby pectmiary loss shall result to the person, 
firm or corporation depositing such margins, such member shall be 
suspended or expelled at the discretion of the Board of Directors. 



GUI for oom Sbc. 32. A. The Board of Directors is hereby empowered to estab- 

lish a public "Call" for com, oats, wheat and rye to arrive, to be held 
in the Exchange Room immediately after the dose of the r^^ar 
session on each business day. 

B. Contracts may be made on the "Call" only in such articles 
and upon such terms as have been approved by the " Call " Conmiittee. 

C. The "CaU" shaU be under the control and management of a 
committee consisting of five members appointed by the President with 
the approval of the Board of Directors. 

D. Final bids on the "Call," less the regular commission charges 
for receiving and accotmting for such property, may be forwarded to 
dealers. It is the intent of this rule to provide for a public competi- 



[KULB IV.) 



23 



tive market for the articles dealt in, and that with such market, all 
making of new prices by members of this Association shall cease until 
the next business day. 

£. Any transaction by members of this Association, made with 
intent to evade the provisions of this rule, shall be deemed uncom- 
mercial conduct and upon conviction such member shall be suspended 
from the privileges of the Association for such time as the Board of 
Directors may elect. 



Sec. 34. The Board of Directors shall promulgate regulations to SoUoitoxB. 
control the employment by members of solicitors of orders for the 
purchase and sale of property for future delivery upon the Exchange 
of this Association. No person, firm or corporation enjoying the privi- 
leges of this Association shall employ any person as such solicitor 
until such solicitor shall have been approved by the Membership Com- 
mittee, nor continue such employment after having been directed by 
such committee to discontinue it. Any member who, or whose firm 
or corporation, shall be convicted by the Board of Directors of a viola- 
tion of this nile, or any regulation thereunder, shall be expelled from 
this Association. 



Sec. 36. Whenever it shall appear to the Board of Directors ocmtiol over 
that any member has formed a partnership with one or more persons, *** ^ 

not members of this Association, and that thereby the interest and 
good repute of this Association may suffer, the Board of Directors 
may, after investigating the facts of the case, require said member to 
withdraw from such partnership; and if he shall fail to do so within 
a reasonable time to be fixed by the Board of Directors, he shall be 
suspended from all the privileges of this Association until he shall 
have severed his connection with such partnership. 



24 



[Rous y.-VL 



RMordi. 
Property. 

Statutioi. 
AnnuAl report. 



Notice to 
Oommitteee. 



GorreepoDi- 
denoe. 

Attend 
meetings of 
oommittees. 



GoUeotione. 



Other duties. 



Certifioates of 
appointment. 



Appointments 
revocable. 

To assist in 
pexforming 
the duties of 
Secretary. 



Shall receive 
funds of 
Association. 

How disburse. 
Beports. 



Books 

aecessible to 
Dirsotoxs. 



RULE V. 

DUTIBS OF THE SECRETARY AND ASSISTANT SECRETARY. 

Section 1. The Secretary, under the direction and control of 
the Board of Directors, shall keep a journal of the proceedings of 
the Association; take charge of the seal, books, papers and property 
belonging to the Association; keep an account of the imports and 
exports of the city, collect and record valuable statistical information 
pertaining to the commercial, mercantile and manufacturing interests 
of the City of Chicago, and post the same on 'Change daily; and on or 
about the 1st of January in each year, he shall make to the Association 
a full report of the business of the city for the preceding year ending 
December 31, embracing such other information in his possession as 
may be of interest to the members. He shall furnish to the chairman 
of every special committee a copy of the resolutions whereby such 
committee shall have been appointed, and under the direction of the 
President, he shaU give notice of any meetings of the Board of Directors 
or of the Association. He shall conduct the correspondence of the 
Association, and read such records or papers as the presiding officer 
may direct; shall attend meetings of the Committees of Arbitration, 
of Appeals, and of the Board of Directors, and keep an official record 
of their proceedings, give notices when their services are reqviired, 
issue the necessary notices and papers to parties, and deliver copies of 
all awards or findings. He shall credit all moneys due to the Associa- 
tion for assessments, fines, fees or otherwise, and pay the same to the 
Treasurer; shall keep his office open during usual business hours; 
shall see that the rooms and property of the Association are kept in 
good order, and shall perform such other duties as the Board of Direc- 
tors may from time to time direct. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to furnish to all 
Inspectors, Gangers, Weighers and Measurers, appointed by the 
Board of Directors, official cretificates of their appointments, bearing 
the signatures of the President and Secretary and the seal of the 
Association. Such certificate shall specify their duty and the time 
for which they are appointed, and also that such appointments are 
revocable at the will and pleasure of said Board. 

Sec 3. The Assistant Secretary shall perform such duties per- 
taining to the office of the Secretary as the Directors or the Secretary 
shall order, and in the temporary absence or disability of the Secretary, 
shall perform the]duties of Secretary. 

RULE VI. 

DUTIES OF THE TREASURER. 

Section 1. The Treasurer shall receive from the Secretary 
deposit of funds belonging to the Association, and shall disbtirse the 
same on the order of the Secretary, countersigned by the President. 
He shall make a full report to the Association at its annual meeting 
of all receipts and disbursements by him, of funds received and of 
the balances, if any, remaining in his hands. The accounts of the 
Treasurer shall be kept in books belonging to the Association, which 
books shall at all times be open for the examination of the Board of 
Directors or any committee of said Board. 



(BuLM vn.-yiiL] 



25 



RULE VII. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Section 1. The Association shall hold its Annual Meeting o&^®^"^*^ . 
the second Monday after the second day of January. elMtioa, 

RULE VIII. 

COMMITTEE OP ARBITRATION AND APPEALS. 

Section 1. It shaU be the duty of the Committee of Arbitration g^ee of 
to hear and determine all cases of disputed claims voltmtarily sub- Axbitzatian. 
mitted for their adjudication by members of the Association. All 
evidence in such cases shall be taken under oath or affirmation, except BTidenoe. 
documentary evidence, which shall be sworn to, if demanded by either 
party and the committee decide it to be necessary, and shall be duly 
recorded. In all such adjudications the committee shall construe How to 
all Rules, Regulations and By-Laws of the Association as being ^2^™* 
designed to secure justice and equity in trade; and all awards or 
findings shall be made in conformity therewith. 

In case either party shall so demand, by previous notice given to the Stcnogimphio 
Secretary, the testimony and proceedings of the Committee of Arbi- "^ 
tration shall be taken by a stenographer, the cost of which shall be 
assessed by the committee as in cases of other costs incurred. 

Sec. 2. Any award or finding of the Committee of Arbitration 
may be appealed from, and the case may be carried to the Committee 
of Appeals for revision; provided, notice of such appeal shall be gi'^'en Appeal to 
to the Secretary, in writing, within two business days after such Appeals, 
award or finding shall have been delivered to the parties in contro- ^®^ "*•**•* 
versy. 

Sec 3. It shall be the duty of the Committee of Appeals to review Oommittee off 
such cases as may be appealed from the Committee of Arbitration and j^SS^* 
formally brought before it, and its awards or findings shall be final 
and binding, and shall not be subject to revision by any other tribunal ita awaxde no4 
of the Association; provided, the Board of Directors may determine, JjJ^SL*** 
from the record and other evidence, as to the proper constitution of 
any committee and as to the regularity of its proceedings. The said Regularity. 
Committee of Appeals shall receive such new evidence as may be New evidenoe. 
offered under oath or affirmation; and if, in its judgment, evidence is 
produced which will justify a rehearing of the case by the Committee Ramandinc 
of Arbitration, it shall remand the case to the said Committee of '^■" 
Arbitration for a new trial. Any final award or finding of the Com- l^inal awards, 
mittee of Appeals shall be based on the record of the Committee of g^^ 
Arbitration, and shall be made in like manner as prescribed by Sec- governed, 
tion 1 of this Rule. 

Sec 4. Five of either of these committees shall be a quorum for Qaoram. 
the transaction of business, and a majority decision of such quorum JJjjJJ*^ 
shall be binding. bindinc. 

Sec 5. The Committee of Arbitration and the Committee of Awards, 
Appeals shall each render their awards or findings in writing, through ^^^ rendered, 
the Secretary of the Association, within two business days after their when 
decisions shall have been made. Such awards or findings shall be "****"•*** 
signed by the Chairman of the Committee, and shall be certified by 



26 



CRuu vm.] 



Vaoandes, 
howfiUad. 



Speoial 

Oomznitteai of 
Axbitratioin, 
bow fonned 
and goTemad. 

AwAida. 



Official the Secretary under the seal of the Association. The oflScial records 

to memban. £Uid decisions of these committees, and all other records of the Asso- 
ciation, may be inspected by any member of the Association upon 
application to the Secretary. 

Sec. 6. When, from absence or disqualification of regular mem- 
bers, either the Committee of Arbitration or Appeals cannot be 
formed, the parties in controversy shall be allowed to fill vacancies 
with any member or members of the Association willing to serve (not 
being of the other committee), on whom they may agree; or, if such 
parties are unwilling to submit their case to the Conmiittee of Arbi- 
tration, they may choose three or more members (willing to serve 
and not being of the Committee of Appeals) whom they may agree 
upon; such agreement, in either case, to be communicated to the 
Secretary in writing, signed by all the parties in controversy. A 
majority award or finding of any such committee shaU be binding, 
and any award or finding of committees thus formed shall be made 
under the same Rules, and shall have the same effect as if made by 
the regidar committees, respectively. 

Sec. 7. Before entering upon the duties of their office the mem- 
bers of any Committee of Arbitration or Committee of Appeals shall 
be required to take or subscribe to the following oath or affirmation, 
viz.: "You do solemnly swear (or affirm) that you respectively will 
faithfully and fairly hear and examine all matters of controversy 
which may come before you during your tenure of office, and that 
you will in all cases make just and equitable awards or findings upon 
the same, in conformity with the Rules, Regulations and By-Laws of 
the Association, and according to the evidence, to the best of your 
understanding; so help you God." 

iulmu^imtion Sec. 8. The Chairman or Acting Chairman of any Committee of 
to witneisaa. Arbitration or Appeals shall have power to adminster suitable oaths 
to the parties and witnesses, and to issue citations to witnesses. 



Oath of 

membenof 

Ctommittaaa. 



Submiariona, 
how mada. 

AgnwMSit 
to abida by 
award. 



Poatponamant 
of tnal. 

Trifling mat- 
tan not to ba 
antertained. 



Finaof 
mamben of 
oommittaea. 



Sec. 9. Parties desiring the services of either of the forgoing 
committees shall notify the Secretary to that effect in writing, and, 
before the hearing of the case, shall file an agreement with him, signed 
by the parties to the controversy, binding themselves to abide, perform 
and fulfill the final award or finding which shall be made touching the 
matter submitted, without recourse to any other court or tribunal. 
Neither party shall postpone the trial of a case longer than ten days 
after it has been submitted, unless good cause can be shown therefor, 
satisfactory to the committee. Trifling and unimportant matters shall 
not be entertained by the Committee of Arbitration. Any member 
of a firm may execute said agreement on behalf of such firm. 

Sec. 10. Members of the Committees of Arbitration and Appeals 
failing to attend when their services are required may be fined, for 
the use of the Association, three dollars for each defatdt, unless a 
satisfactory excuse shall be made to the Committee. 



Ruus VIIL-IX.-X. 



27 



Sec. 11. The fees for arbitration, under the Rules, By-Laws andF< 
Regulations of the Association, shall be as follows: 

For each case where the amotint in controversy shall be under 

$500 $10 00 

Where the amount in controversy shall be from $500 to $1,000. . 15 00 
Where the amoimt in controversy shall be from $1,000 to $1,500 20 00 
Where the amotint in controversy shall be from $1,500 to $2,500 25 00 
Where the amount in controversy shall be from $2,500 upward . 50 00 

The fees, as above, shall be paid in advance, to the Secretary, by 
the party bringing the case, and shall be equally divided between the 
members of the Committee hearing the case. 

Sec. 12. The fees of the Committee of Appeals shall be the same Fe« on 
as the fees in the same case before the Committee of Arbitration ; and •pp®*"* 
they shall be paid and disposed of in the same manner. 

Sec. 13. If parties to a controversy fail to appear at the time Failure to 
set for trial, or request a postponement, they may (if the case is post- •pp*"* 
poned) be assessed with costs, by and for the use of the committee, Ooj*» ^^^ 
in any sum in the committee's discretion, not exceeding five dollars. 
The committee, however, may insist that the trial shall take place 
without postponement. 

Sec. 14. When neither of the parties in the controversy is aFe«on 
member of the Association, the aforesaid fees may be doubled. Fees, JUn^^mfiBn/ 
and all additional costs that may be incurred in the investigation of qq^^^ ^ y^ 
suits, shall be finally paid by either of the parties in the case, as may *"^2S?*^ 
be decided by the committee hearing the same, and shall be included 
in their award or finding. 

RULE IX. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

Section 1. Special committees may be appointed by the Asso-How^ 
ciatioii, by the President, or by the Board of Directors, to such service •pp**"* • 
and in such manner as they may see fit, and it shall be the duty of 
every committee appointed by the Association, the President, or the 
Board of Directors, to act when properly called upon. 

RULE X. 

MEMBERSHIP AND ASSESSMENTS. 

Section 1. All applications for membership in the Association Committee on 
shall be referred to the Committee on Membership, who shall hold £^ regular 
regular stated meetings for examining such applicants and their sponsors, ™««tJ'^«»- 
in person, under such rules and regulations as may be made by the 
Board of Directors. Any male person of good character and credit, Qualifioationa 
and of legal age, on presenting a written application, indorsed by two 
members, and stating the name and business avocation of the appli- 
cant, after ten day^' notice of such application shall have been posted Applioatian. 
on the bulletin of the Exchange, may be admitted to membership 
upon approval by at least ten (10) affirmative ballot votes of the 
Board of Directors; provided, that three negative ballot votes are not 
cast against such applicant, and upon payment of an initiation fee of 
ten thousand dollars, or on presentation of an unimpaired or unfor- 
feited membership, duly transferred, and by signing an agreement to 



28 



(RuuB X.-XI.J 



Ositifioateoff 
inoEnbonhip* . 

Whoi 
tnaaferable. 



How 
tranaferable. 



MsmbflSBhip 
of deoeaaed 
penoDs. 

Application to 

txanafertobe 

posted. 



AnTiniil 
payment ox. 



Duty of Mem- 
beranip Com- 
mittee in 
of mjarepre- 
aentation of 
applicant. 



OonditioDa. 



Privilegeaof 



abide by the Rules, Regulations and By-Laws of the Association, 
and all amendments that may be made thereto. 

Sec. 2. Every member shall be entitled to receive a certificate of 
membership, bearing the corporate seal of the Association and the 
signatures of the President and Secretary; and if the member in whose 
name said certificate stands has paid all assessments due, and has 
against him no outstanding, unadjusted or unsettled claims or con- 
tracts held by members of the Association, and said membership is 
not in any way impaired or forfeited, it shall, upon the payment of 
one hundred (100) dollars, be transferable upon the books of the 
Association to any person eligible to membership who may be approved 
by the Board of Directors, after due notice, by posting, as provided 
in Section 1 of this Rule. The membership of a deceased member 
shall be transferable in like manner, by his legal representative. 
Prior to the transfer of any membership, application for such transfer 
shall be posted upon the bulletin of the Exchange for at least ten days, 
when, if no objection is made, it shall be assumed the member has no 
outstanding claims against him. 

All moneys derived from the transfer of memberships, under and 
by virtue of the provisions of this Rule, shall constitute a fund to be 
applied by the Board of Directors to the liquidation of the bonded 
indebtedness of this Association. 

Sec. 3. When the annual assessment is made, it shall be con- 
sidered due, and any member neglecting or refusing to pay the same 
within thirty days thereafter, may be excluded from the rooms of the 
Association until such assessment is paid. And in case of the failure 
of any member to pay the annual assessment during the whole of any 
fiscal year of the Association (said fiscal year beginning and closing 
with the day of the regular annual election), such failure shall of 
itself operate as a forfeiture and cancellation of the membership of 
such member and of all rights and privileges thereunder. Payment 
of annual assessments by a member while under suspension, shall not 
be construed as in any way affecting such suspension. 

Sec. 4. If any applicant shall intentionally or willfully misstate 
or suppress any fact, or be guilty of any other fraudulent or dishonest 
act to secure his acceptance as a member, and thereafter and thereby 
become a member, the Membership Committee shall, upon the dis- 
covery of such misconduct, immediately report the same to the Board 
of Directors, which, after due notice to such member of the time and 
place of such hearing, shall investigate such charges, and if such 
member shall be found guilty the Board of Directors shall declare 
such membership forfeited. 

RULE XI. 

MESSENGERS. 

Section 1. The Board of Directors shall be authorized, imder 
such restrictions, regulations and limitations as they may deem 
proper, to grant admission to the Exchange rooms to messengers for 
members, such messengers not to be allowed to transact any business 
beyond communicating with their principals, and not to remain 
longer than is necessary for that purpose. 



[Bdkm zii.-xiii.-xnr.] 



29 



RULE XII. 

VISITORS. 

Sbction 1. Visitors may be introduced to the Exchange rooms In*«>dn«*»«« 
ttpon such terms and for such time as the Board of Directors n:iay 
from time to time determine. No person holding a visitor's ticket Il«Btri«tloiii. 
shall be permitted to negotiate or transact any business in the Ex- 
change rooms. For any violation of this Rule the privilege of visiting 
the rooms may be forfeited. 

RULE XIII. 

PRBSS TICKBTS. 

Sbction 1. The Board of Directors may authorize the issue ^^^"bJJiiSo?^ 
tickets of admission to the Exchange rooms to members of the news- Diraoton. 
paper press under such restrictions and regulations as they may deem 
proper; but no person holding such a ticket shall be allowed to transact B*rtriolloM. 
any business in the Exchange room except the collection of information 
for the newspaper for which he shall be employed. 

RULE XIV. 

BROKBRS. 

Sbction 1. A. Members may act as brokers between other 
members only, except in making contracts between members of this 
Association and authorized agents of transportation companies, 
vessel owners, railroad, insurance or banking companies in connection 
with the ordinary legitimate business of the latter, but in all cases 
the agent or broker of such person, firm or corporation, shall be held 
liable both for the acceptance of contracts by alleged principals and 
for the faithftd execution of the same, under the rules of the Asso- 
ciation, by such principal. Provided that on C. I. P. contracts for 
grain for shipment to points outside Chicago, the broker so contracting 
may, if desired, give up to members for whose account such contracts 
have been made, the name of his principal, even though such principal 
be not a member of this Association. Provided, however, that in 
such cases brokers shall be held liable both for the acceptance of such 
contracts and for their faithful performance under the rules of this 
Association. 

B. Brokers shall be held personally liable on any transaction 
made by them until they have given the name of a principal acceptable 
to the other party to the transaction. 

C. A commission or brokerage mtist be paid on every transaction 
as prescribed in this rule. 

brokbragb by gradb. 

Sbc. 2. A. The*' following rates|of brokerage, being just and 
reasonable, are hereby established as the Tninimum charge which 
shall be made by members of this Association for the transaction of 
the business specified in this section: 

B. For the purchase, or for the sale, by grade alone, of wheat, 
com or oats, to be delivered in store in regular houses, either for 
immediate or for future delivery, ten cents per 1,000 bushels. 



30 



PIulbZIV. 



C. For the purchase, or for the sale, by grade alone, of rye, barley 
or flaxseed, to be delivered in store in regular houses, either for imme- 
diate or for future delivery, twenty-five cents per 1,000 bushels. 
^ ' D. For the purchase, or for the sale, of all kinds of grain or flax- 
seed, in store in Chicago, when special location or character of property 
is stipulated, fifty cents per 1,0Q0 bushels. 

E. For the purchase, orjfor the sale, of "Contract" pork or lard 
for immediate or for future delivery, two-fifths of one cent per barrel 
or per tierce, respectively. 

F. For the purchase, or for the sale, of "Contract" D. S. short 
ribs, or D. S. extra short clears, for immediate or for future delivery, 
two cents per 1,000 pounds. 

G. For the purchase, or for the sale, by grade alone, either for 

immediate or for future delivery, or to arrive, or in carload lots in 

any position: 

On wheat, rye or barley per car, $1 . 00 

On com or oats " " .50 

On hay or straw " ** 2.00 

On ear com " * 1 . 50 

On screenings, bran, middlings and all kinds of ground 

feed « « 1.00 

On flaxseed " « 1.00 

On clover, timothy, millet, Hungarian, mustard or buck- 
wheat seeds " " 2. 00 

On seeds in less than carload lots (provided total charge 

is not more than $2.00) per bag, . 02 

BROKERAGE BY SAMPLE AND C. I. P. 

Sec. 3. A. The following rates of brokerage, being just and 
reasonable, are hereby established as the minimum charge whict 
shall be made by members of this Association for the transaction o 
the business specified in this section. 

B. For the purchase, or for the sale, by sample or by grade and 

sample combined, for immediate or for future delivery, or to arrive, 

or in carload lots in any position : 

On wheat, rye or barley per car, $1 . 00 

On com or oats " " .50 

On ear com * " 1 . 50 

On hay or straw " " 2.00 

On screenings, bran, middlings, and all kinds of groimd 

feed « " 1.00 

On flaxseed " " 1.00 

On clover, millet, Hungarian, timothy, mustard or buck- 
wheat seeds " " 2.00 

On seeds in less than carload lots (provided total charge 

is not more than $2.00) per bag, . 02 



IBiiuiZiy.] 



31 



C. For the purchase, or for the sale, of all kinds of grain C. I. F. 
for shipment by water or rail, to or from Chicago or other points, 
one-eighth of one cent per bushel in lots of 5,000 bushels or more, and 
one-quarter of one cent per bushel in lots of less than 5,000 bushels. 

COMMISSIONS FOR BUYING OR SELLING, OR 
FOR BUYING AND SELLING. 

Sec. 4. A. The following rates of commission, being just and 
reasonable, are hereby established as the minimum charge that shall 
be made by members of this Association for the transaction of the 
business specified in this section: 

B. For the purchase, or for the sale, or for the purchase and 
sale, by grade alone, of wheat, com or oats, to be delivered in store, 
either for immediate or for future delivery, seven dollars and fifty 
cents per 5,000 bushels. 

C. For the purchase, or for the sale, or for the purchase and 
sale, by grade alone , of rye, barley or flaxseed, to be delivered in 
store, either for immediate or for future delivery, one-quarter of 
one cent per bushel. 

D. For the purchase, or for the sale, or for the purchase and 
sale of lard, six cents per tierce. 

£. For the purchase, or for the sale, or for the purchase and 
sale of pork, five cents per barrel. 

F. For the purchase, or for the sale, or for the purchase and 
sale of D. S. short ribs or D. S. extra short clears, twenty-five cents 
per 1,000 pounds. 

G. It is hereby provided that upon transactions specified in the 
foregoing paragraphs of this section which are made for the account 
of members of this Association, or for firms one of whose general 
partners is a member, or for corporations entitled under Section 8 
of this rule to members' rates, one-half of the foregoing minimum 
specified rates shall be charged and shall be the minimum rates in 
such cases. 

H. It is further provided that to members who personally do 
their own buying and selling, but who clear their trades through other 
members, the minimum rates of commission on all transactions opened 
and closed within ten days shall be twenty-five cents per 1,000 bushels 
of grain, one cent per package of pork, three dollars per lot of 250 
tierces of lard, and five cents per 1,000 pounds of D. S. short ribs or 
D. S. extra short clears. 

It is further provided that the minimum rates of commission on 
all such trades as are not actually closed within the prescribed limit of 
ten days, shall be members' rates; but the clearing member may pay 
the principal the rates of brokerage prescribed in Section 2 of this 
Rule, as compensation for executing such trades. It is expressly 
understood that all such transactions shall be for the personal account 
of the member, firm or corporation for whom the trades are cleared, 
and in no case, directly or indirectly, on behalf of any other person, 
either wholly or in part. 



32 



ptouiZIV.) 



Hence, if trades in grain are opened and closed within 
10 days, the principal shall pay the clearing mem- 
ber (per 6,000 lot) $1.25 

If trades in wheat, com or oats are opened, but not 
closed within 10 days, the principal shall pay the 

clearing member (per 5,000 lot) $3. 75 

Less brokerage for both bu3ring and selling (this para- 
graph only contemplates trades executed by the 

principal) 1.00 2.75 

The same principle shall apply in construing commission rates to 
be charged for executing similar transactions in all other commodities 
dealt in under the rules of this Association. 

J. Trades made under the foregoing paragraph, where one side of 
such trades only is executed by the principal, and the other side either 
by the clearing member or broker, whether closed within the pre- 
scribed limit of ten days or not, shall be subject to members' rates of 
commission, but the clearing member may allow the principal the 
minimum rates of brokerage on the portion of the trades executed 
by. the principal. If a broker is employed to execute any portion of 
such trades, the party emplo3ring such broker shall pay the brokerage 
thus incurred, the minimum rates for such service being those pre- 
scribed in Section 2 of this Rule. 
Hence, on trades made in wheat, com or oats, whether 
opened and closed within 10 days or not, the prin- 
cipal shall pay the clearing member (per 5,000 lot) . $3. 75 
Less brokerage (one side being executed by the prin- 
cipal) 50 $3 . 25 

If closed either by clearing member, or broker employed 
by him, the principal shall pay the clearing mem- 
ber (per 5,000 lot) 3.25 

If closed by a broker employed by the principal, the 
principal shall pay the clearing member (per 5,000 
lot), (it being understood that the clearing mem- 
ber shall pay the broker) 3. 76 

The same principle shall apply in construing commission rates 
to be charged for executing similar transactions in all other com- 
modities dealt in under the rules of this Association. 

K. Members cannot clear through other members as contem- 
plated in paragraphs H and J any trade that is not for their own 
account; but members receiving orders may execute them and turn 
over any resulting trades, with the name of the customer, to other 
members, in which case the latter shall pay the former the minimum 
brokerage rates as compensation for executing the order. 

COMMISSIONS — BUYING OR SELLING AND ACCOUNTING. 

Sec. 5. A. The following rates of conmiission, being just and 
reasonable, are hereby established as the minimum charge that shall 
be made by members of this Association for the transaction of^the 
business specified in this section: 

B. For receiving and selling, or for buying, either to be loaded 
or to be unloaded or to be forwarded, by grade, or sample or both 



« 



IKviM XIV.) 



33 



m m 



m m 



either for immediate or for future delivery, or to amve, or in carload 
lots in any position : 

On wheat, rye or barley 1 cent per bushel 

On com or oats i " * * 

On ear com 1 " • 

On bran, middlings, screenings, ground feed and all 

millstuffs $5 . 00 per car 

On hay or straw (of 10 tons or less) 7 . 60 ** " 

On hay or straw (of more than 10 tons) 75 cents per ton 

On broom com J cent per pound 

On flaxseed or cloverseed 1 per cent 

On flaxseed or cloverseed in less than carload lots.. . . 1) 
On timothy, millet, Hungarian, mustard or buck- 
wheat seeds (carloads or less) 1) 

C. For the purchase or for the sale of all kinds of grain contained 
in canal boats, by grade, by sample, or by grade and sample com- 
bined, i cent per bushel. 

D. For the purchase and sale by grade or by sample, or grade 
and sample combined, of the following described property to arrive: 
On carload lots of flaxseed or cloverseed 1 per cent 

On buckwheat, timothy, millet, Hungarian, or mus- 
tard seeds, either carloads or less 1) * • 

On carload lots of wheat, rye or barley 1 cent per bushel 

On carload lots of com or oats ) • * * 

On carload lots of ear com 1 * * * 

For receiving and selling, or for bu3ring and shipping 

pork, lard, green, cured or partly cured meats. . . . ) of 1 per cent 
£. It is hereby provided that upon transactions specified in the 
foregoing paragraphs of this section which are made for the account 
of members of this Association, or for firms one at least of whose 
general partners is a member of this Association, or for corporations 
entitled under Section 8 of this Rule to members' rates, three-fourths of 
the foregoing rates shall be the minimum rates charged; except that 
in the case of provisions one-half of the foregoing specified rate shall 
be the minimum rate. 

F. Whenever members of this Association, acting as principals or 

agents, shall have made a purchase of any of the property mentioned 
in this section, to arrive, or in transit, such members shall notify in 
writing, the party from whom such purchase was made, of the price 
and terms of such purchase on the same day upon which the trans- 
action takes place. 

These requirements shall apply only to shipments from country 
points, either to Chicago or to other markets, if purchased in Chicago 
market, whether such property is to be shipped or is in transit. 

BUYING OR SELLING VESSEL LOTS. 

Sec. 6. A. The following rates of commission, being just and 
reasonable, are hereby established for receiving and selling, or for 
buying and shipping the following described property by vessels: 

On wheat, rye, barley or flaxseed J cent per bushel 

On com or oats J ** ** 

These shall be the minimum rates for both members and non- 
members. 



34 



[RouXIY.] 



ADDITIONAL CHARGES. 

Sbc. 7. A. In addition to all the rates of commission pre- 
scribed by this rule, there shall be charged all legitimate expenses 
incurred in handling and caring for the property involved, including 
storage, insurance, inspection, weighing. Cost of sampling shall 
not be considered a charge against the property. 

CORPORATIONS. 

Sec. 8. A. Any corporation having for one of its executive 
officers and stockholders a member cf this Board, may submit to the 
Board of Directors, or a committee appointed for such purpose, a 
full disclosure of the relations of such member to such corporation, 
and if such member shall, upon investigation, be found to be a real 
bona fide and substantial executive officer and stockholder of such 
corporation, and that such relation is not created for the sole purpose 
of obtaining members' rates, such corporation shall be thereafter, 
and so long as such member shall remain such officer and stockholder, 
entitled to members' rates provided in this rule; provided, that for the 
purpose of this rule, not more than one corporation can be represented 
by the same member of this Association as its executive officer. 

Whenever any such corporation shall be so fotmd entitled to 
members' rates, it shall, whenever requested by the Board of Directors, 
or such committee, make a full disclosure of the then existing relations 
of such member to such corporation. If it shall refuse so to do, itf 
right to members' rates shall thereupon cease. 

B. On all transactions for the account of any officer, agent, 
employe or stockholder of any such corporation, not a member of 
this Association, such corporation must exact non-members' rates 
of commissions. 

C. No firm or corporation shall enjoy members' rates by virtue 
of a membership in the Chicago Board of Trade in the name of one 
of its members, if a firm, or in the name of one of its executive officers, 
If a corporation, if said member of the Board shall at the same time 
be a member of a firm, or president or secretary of a corporation, 
represented in the membership of the Clearing House of the Board 
of Trade. One membership shall only secure members' rates to one 
firm or one corporation. 

constructions. 

Sec. 9. A. On all transactions where the purchase or sale 
of cash grain is made contingent on the price ruling for future delivery, 
and where the purchase or sale of the future delivery is at once accom- 
plished, fixing by such transaction the value of the cash grain so 
bought or sold, it shall be construed that the purchase or sale of the 
future delivery shall be a part of the cash transaction. Should the 
purchase or sale of grain for future delivery upon which the cash 
transaction is based be held subject to the convenience or subject to 
the orders of the parties with whom such transaction is made, then 
all such business for future delivery shall be subject to- the regular 
rates of commission as prescribed in this rule. 

B. In no case shall the aggregate amount of brokerage allowed on 
any transaction be such that the net commission to members on such 



ptuuH ZIV.-ZV.-XVI.1 



35 



transaction shall be less than the minimum rates prescribed in Para- 
graph H, Section 4 of this rule, for clearing trades for members. 

C. Members cannot abate or divide with other members the rates 
prescribed in Paragraph H, Section 4 of this nile, for clearing. 

D. A firm whose only member of the Association is a special 
partner in such firm is not entitled to members' rates. 

B. A firm or a corporation shall charge regular rates of commis- 
sion on all transactions in which only a part of such firm or corpora- 
tion appears as a principal. 

P. Any member who, or whose firm or corporation, shall be con- 
victed by the Board of Directors of a violation of the provisions of 
this rule, or of any evasion thereof by making rebates in prices, by 
making any contract or observing any contract already made, by 
furnishing a membership in this Exchange, by giving any bonus, 
gift, donation or otherwise, or shall purchase or offer to purchase any 
grain, seeds, provisions or other commodities consigned to him, them, 
or it, for sale, or by rendering any other service or concession whatso- 
ever, with the intent to evade in any way directly or indirectly the 
regular rates of commission or brokerage established by this rule, 
shall be expelled from this Association. Free telegraphic communi- 
cation, however, shall not be construed as a violation of this nile. 

G. The Board of Directors is authorized to offer a reward of not 
more than twenty-five hundred dollars to any person who shall fur- 
nish evidence that does convict any member, firm or corporation of a 

violation of this rule. 

RULE XV. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

Section 1. No appropriation of money or other property of the 
Association shall be made except to defray its legitimate business 
expenditures or to promote the purpose of its organization. 

RULE XVL 

HOURS FOR REGULAR TRADING. 

Section 1. No trade or contract for the future delivery of grain 
or provisions shall be made, or offered to be made, by any member or 
members of this Association, in the Exchange room of the Board, nor 
in any of the public streets, courts or passages in the immediate 
vicinity thereof, or in any hall, or exchange hall, or corridor in any 
building located or fronting on any such streets, courts or passages, 
on any business day, except from 9:30 o'clock a. m. to 1:15 o'clock 
p. M ., or upon any Saturday except from 9 :30 o'clock a. M. to 12 o'clock 
M., nor on any day or that part of any day on which the Board shall 
hold no business session; it being the object and intent of this rule 
that aU such trading which may tend to the maintenance of a public 
market shall be confined within the hours above specified. On any 
alleged violation by a member of this Association of the provisions of 
this rule which shall be brought to the attention of the President of 
the Board by creditable report, it shall be the duty of the President 
to cause said member to be summoned before the Board of Directors, 
and if the party shall be found guilty of such violation of the rule, he 
shall be suspended for not less than one month nor more than one 
year, and for a second violation he shall be expelled. 



36 



] 



M ok applieabis 

Imgular 
TmiHuitians. 



Definite figun 
oi prioe. 



** Provided, however, that the provisions of this section shall not 
apply to contracts made upon any public "Call" established under 
the rules of this Association 

Sec. 2. All transactions in future contracts for property shall 
be deemed irregular when on the basis of money considerations added 
to or deducted from the contract price; and such transactions shall be 
esteemed misconduct and punishable by suspension at the discretion 
of the President or Board of Directors. 

Sec. 3. All contracts and offers to contract for grain for future 
delivery shall be at one figure of price, having as the multiple of price 
one-eighth of a cent per bushel; provided, however, that offers and 
contracts may be made to include one-half the total amount of each 
contract at any given price, and the remainder of said contract at a 
price one-eighth of one cent per bushel higher or lower than the other 
moiety and not otherwise ; the same principle to apply on transactions 
for the future delivery of provisions ; and every infraction of this rule 
shall be deemed misconduct and punishable by suspension at the 
discretion of the Board of Directors. 



Prohibited. 



DMoription. 



RULE XVII. 

SMOKING. 

Section 1. Smoking in the Exchange room of the Association 
shall be deemed discourteous and offensive conduct, and the same is 
hereby prohibited. 

RULE XVIII. 

SEAL. 

Section 1. Th^ Association shall have a seal, bearing a figure 
of Justice with a ship in the distance, surrounded by the words "Board 
of Trade of the City of Chicago." 



One hundied 

membeiBA 

quorum. 



RULE XIX. 

QUORUM. 

Section 1. One hundred members of the Association shall 
constitute a quorum, but a smaller number shall have power to adjourn. 



Protection to 
purehaaen. 



Proteetionto 
■ellam. 



Sefluritiei, 

where 

depoeited. 



RULE XX. 

deposits to secure the fulfillment of time contracts. 

Section 1. On time contracts, purchasers shall have the right 
to require of sellers, as security, a deposit of ten (10) per cent, based 
upon the contract price of the property bought, and further security, 
from time to time, to the extent of any advance in the market value 
above said price. Sellers shall have the right to require as security 
from buyers a deposit of ten (10) per cent on the contract price of the 
property sold, and, in addition, any difference that may exist or occui 
between the estimated legitimate value of any such property and the 
price of sale. All securities shall be deposited, either with the Treas- 
urer of the Association or with some bank duly authorized by the 
Board of Directors to receive such deposits; and shall, in each instance, 
be accompanied by the following form of memorandum or statement: 



[Ruui XX.] 



37 



Bank. 

oaiCAoo. 
189... 

ICABODf CBBTIVICATBa WaNTBD. 

By 


Bank. 

CHICAGO. 

189... 

MR. GEO. F. STONE, 

Seo'y Board of Trade of the City of 
Chicago. 


•** J' 


have deposited approved Check for 
Margin Certificate which we will issue 
today in accordance with your Rules 
as follows. 


worn DBPOBITOB AND 


AMOUNT. 














































% 





The above form of memorandum shall state the name of theJJj^Jf^ 
depository, the date on which the deposit is made, the name of the 
depositor, and also the name or names of the party or parties in 
whose favor the deposit is to be made, together with the amount or 
amounts of such deposit in detail, and also in the aggregate. The 
left-hand part of the memorandum or statement before described 
shall be retained by the depository selected, and the right-hand por- 
tion thereof taken by the depositor, after being duly signed by the 
person authorized to receipt for the said deposit, and, without delay, 
placed in the office of the Clearing House of the Board of Trade of the 
City of Chicago; it being distinctly understood that the provisions of 
Section 2 of this Rule are and shall remain in force, and that the 
issuance of the certificate in the form and manner prescribed in said 
Section 2 is unaffected by the provisions of this section. It is hereby 
provided that such deposits shall not be made with any bank or banks ?**'®^i?^. 
to which the party calling for the said security shall expressly object 
at the time of making such "call;" but in such case the deposit shall 
be made with some duly authorized bank not thus objected to, or 
with the Treasurer of the Association, as the depositor shall elect. 

Sec. 2. All banks which may be appointed to act as depositories Bonds, 
for securities, shall be required to have one or more of their executive 
officers, members of this Board, who shall be held amenable to the 
Rules of said Board in matters of dispute arising from any transactions 
on the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, between the banks they 
represent and any of the members of said Board of Trade, and shall 
execute and file with the Secretary of the Association a good and 
sufficient bond, with sureties, to be approved by the Board of Directors, 
for the proper disposal of the said deposits, in accordance with the 
provisions of the Rules, Regulations and By-Laws of the Association. -- ^j- ^^ 
Said banks shall issue certificates in duplicate, not transferable, for for deposits. 



38 



[RouiXZ.J 



all such deposits. Said certificates shall state by whom the deposit 
was made, and for whose security the same is held, that the deposit 

How payablt. has been made under the Rules of the Board of Trade and is payable 
upon the return of the certificate or its duplicate, duly indorsed by 
the parties to the contract or contracts, or on the order of the President 
of the Board of Trade, as provided by Section 6 of this Rule. Said 

MrtifioatM. certificate shall be in the following form, to- wit: 

Original (or) Duplicate. 

Not Negotiable or Transferable. 

Chicago 19 ... . 

has deposited with this Bank 

Dollars as security on a contract or 

contracts between the depositor and 

which amount is payable on the return of this certificate or its dupli- 
cate, duly indorsed by both of the above-named parties, or on the 
order of the President of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, 
indorsed on either the original or duplicate hereof, as provided by the 
Rules of said Board of Trade, under which the above-named deposit 
has been made. 



CaskUr, 

Deposito to bt All deposits so made shall be held to have been made as security 

Moarity on aU for the faithful fulfillment of any contracts made or to be made between 

Skmn'tho ^^® parties during the time the deposit shall remain impaid ; provided, 

PMtiM. it shall be competent for either party to a contract to demand that 

ExMption. the certificate shall express the particular contract upon which the 

deposit shall have been made, and in such case the deposit shall be 

applicable only to the settlement of that contract. 

MMginawith Sec. 3. The Treasurer of the Association shall, in like manner 

TiBMuier. SLud under like safeguards, receive deposits for security, and issue 

certificates for the same, payable as is provided by Section 2 of this 

Rule. 

NoUeeof Sbc. 4 The party depositing security shall, within one hour 

§S^y^ from the time such deposit shall be called, deposit with the Clearing 

House of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, or with the party 

calling for such deposit, the duplicate certificate for the same, in due 

form, as provided for in Section 2 of this Rule. 

Failure to Sec. 5. Should any party called upon, as herein provided for, fail 

^^^^ ' to deposit the security called, within the next banking hour there- 

S^oloSed' "*^ ^*®^» *^^ party making such call shall have the right, if he be the 

seller, to resell the property for account of the delinquent, such resale 

to be for the same delivery as was named in the original contract; if 

he be the buyer he shall have the right to repurchase the propeiCy 

for account of the delinquent, deliverable at the time named in the 

original purchase; in either case he shall at once communicate to the 

delinquent the action he has elected to take, and all losses or damages 

on such defaulted contract shall be at once due and shall be payable 

through the Clearing House the same as though said contract had 

fully matured. The party so calling may, however, elect to permit 



dUiuXX.) 



39 



the contract to stand, in which case no notice to that effect shall be Notices of oaU 
necessary to the delinquent. All notices for the call of deposits as closing of 
security, or of the closing of contracts under this Rule, may be served oontn^c**- 
on the party called, either in person or by leaving a written notice at 
his place of business, or may be served in person upon his authorized 
representative, or upon any clerk representing the party on 'Change; 
and in case the party called upon shall not be known to have a regular 
place of business, a written notice left in the office of the Secretary of 
the Board shall be deemed sufficient. 

Sec. 6. Upon the fulfillment or settlement of any contract, or Release of 
upon the closing of any contract under the provisions of Section 5 of ^ftSment 
this Rule, deposits upon which have been made, and when the full 
adjustment of all differences relating to the same shall have been 
effected, the deposits shall thereupon be payable to the party deposit- 
ing the same ; and the joint indorsement of both parties upon the 
certificate shall be a sufficient authority to the party holding the 
deposit to pay the same to the holder of the certificate; or in case of 
a failure between the contracting parties to adjust and settle their Failure to 
respective claims upon the deposit within three (3) business days contracts, 
after the maturity of all contracts upon which the deposit is appli- 
cable, the matter in dispute shall, upon the application of either party ^^u^^^fjj^i*** 
to such contracts, be submitted to a select committee of three dis- committee, 
interested persons, members of the Association, to be appointed by 
the President, which committee shall, without unnecessary delay, 
summon the parties before them, and hear such evidence under oath 
as either may wish to submit touching their claims to the deposit, and 
shall by a majority vote decide, and report to the President of the 
Board, in writing, in what manner and to whom the deposit is payable, 
either wholly or in part, whereupon the President shall indorse on President 
either the original or duplicate certificate an order for the payment 
of such deposits in accordance with the decision of said committee, 
and such order shall be a sufficient warrant to the party holding the 
deposit to pay the same in accordance with such order. In case any Penalty for 
member neglects or refuses to indorse a certificate of deposit to theJJi^JJe. 
party entitled to receive the money thereupon when all contracts 
upon which the deposit is applicable are settled, and all money due 
upon such contracts has been paid, he shall be liable to a penalty of 
one per cent, per day on the amount of such certificates, for every 
day such refusal or neglect is continued; and for refusal to promptly 
pay such penalty, the party may, upon due complaint, be suspended 
from all privileges of the Board until the same is paid. In case i^j*®®"?^*!^ 
should occur that by reason of changes in the market, or of delivery upon, released, 
or the settlement of a portion of the contracts upon which security 
has been deposited and to which such security is properly applicable 
under this Rule, that a larger sum remains on deposit than is con- 
templated by Section 1 of this Rule upon then existing unadjusted 
contracts between the parties, and either party to such contract 
should refuse to release such excess of deposit, the President of the 
Board is authorized, upon a representation of the facts and admission 
or proof that such excess ought to be released, to order such release 



40 



[RuLM ZX.-XZL] 



and payment to be made to the party to whom it rightfully belongs, 
by the indorsement of an order to that effect on either the original 
or duplicate certificate or certificates issued for such deposits; pro- 
vided, in case of such disagreement no surrender of the deposit shall 
be ordered pending any arbitration touching the rights of the parties 
under the said contract or contracts, or in case the party refusing to 
adjust the dispute shall signify his willingness to submit the matter 
to arbitration. 
Valtt« of Sbc. 7. In determining the value of property under this Rule, its 

w^tEw value in other markets, or for manufacturing or consumptive pur- 
Role, bow and poses in this market, together with such other facts as may justly 
dctonnined. enter in the determination of its value, shall be considered irrespective 
of any fictitious price it may at the time be selling for in this market. 
Such value, for the purposes of this Rule, in case of disagreement, 
shall be determined by the Board of Directors, and communicated to 
the parties in interest through the President or Secretary. 

RULE XXI. 

RBGULAR DBLIVBRIBS. 

Tender of Sbction 1. All deliveries upon contracts for grain or flax seed, 

^*?pte^ unless otherwise expressly provided, shall be made by tender of regular 



warehouse receipts, which receipts shall have been registered by an 
officer duly appointed for that purpose. All such warehouse receipts 
shall be made to run five days from date of delivery on regular or 
customary storage charges, which regular or customary charges shall 
follow such warehouse receipts and be chargeable upon the property 
covered by the same, and shall be issued by such houses as have 
complied with the Rules of the Board of Trade and the Regulations 
and Requirements of the Board of Directors, and have been declared 
Requiremeota regular warehouses for the storage of grain or flax seed by said Board 
waraSouii^. o^ Directors ; and it shall be the duty of the Board of Directors, prior 
to the first day of July in each year, to inspect all warehouses, the 
proprietors or managers of which shall apply to have their receipts 
declared regular for delivery on contracts under the Rules of the 
Board of Trade, and no warehouse shall be declared a regular ware- 
house unless it is conveniently approachable by vessels of ordinary 
draft and has customary shipping facilities, and unless the storage 
Ratee of rates on all grain or flax seed in such warehouse in bulk and in good 

condition, shall not be in excess of three-quarters (}£) of one cent per 
bushel for the first ten days or part thereof, and one-fortieth (1-40) of 
one cent per bushel for each additional day thereafter until from and 
after July 1, 1910, when the storage rates shall not be in excess of 
one (1) cent per bushel for the first ten days or part thereof, and 
one-thirtieth (1-30) of one cent per bushel for each additional day 
thereafter so long as such grain or flax seed remains in good condition, 
and unless the proprietors or managers of such warehouse are in good 
financial standing and credit, and are canying on and intend to 
continue to carry on the legitimate business of public warehousemen 
under the laws of the State of Illinois and in accordance with the 
Rules of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago and the Regula- 
tions and Requirements of the Board of Directors and until the 



eloTBge. 



RuLi XXI.] 



41 



proprietors or managers of such warehotise shall file a bond with Bond, 
sufficient sureties in such sum and subject to such conditions as may '"®^^^^ ^• 
be deemed necessary by the Board of Directors, under the Rules of 
the Board of Trade and the Regulations and Requirements of the 
Board of Directors in reference to warehouses. \ 

And furthermore, the proprietors or managers of such warehouse shipmeata by 
shall be required to sell their regular contract grades of grain or flax pJ?p"®***'* 
seed in the Chicago market only, and shall not ship any grain from "off Krades." 
any regular warehouse, of which they are proprietors or managers, 
except those grades which are denominated and understood to be 
"off grades"; provided, however, that the Board of Directors of the 
Board of Trade may, upon application, grant to such elevator pro- 
prietors or managers the privilege of shipping such quantity of grain 
from their elevators as wiU sufficiently relieve such elevators from 
being overloaded, or as will maintain the condition of such grain; and 
furthermore, the proprietors or managers of such warehouse shall be 
prohibited from hxiying grain at any non-competing points. 

Whenever application shall be made by the proprietors or managers jteauirwnent 
of any warehouse to have the same declared a regular warehouse for for removal ol 
the storage of grain and flax seed under the provisions of this Rule warehouMs 
(except in cases of renewal on the first day of July in each year, as JjEEjjjJ ^ ^ 
hereinbefore provided) any grain or flax seed that may be contained in 
said warehouse at the time of such application, shall be required to 
be removed from said warehouse, when after it shall have been 
graded and inspected according to its quality and condition then 
existing by the duly constituted authorities, such grain or flax seed 
may then again be received into said warehouse and receipts issued 
therefor shall be registered and dated upon the day when such grain 
or flax seed is again actually received into said warehouse. 

The chief inspector of grain of the State of Illinois may, upon supervising 
request of the Board of Directors of the Board of Trade, appoint a^^'P**'*^' 
supervising inspector who shall so supervise the storage and distribu- 
tion of grain and of flax seed in such warehouse that no discrimination 
or selection can be made in the quality or grade of grain or flax seed 
in the delivery of such grain or flax seed. 

Warehouse receipts issued by warehouses so declared regular by Warebouaa 
the Board of Directors shall be regular for delivery on contracts under 'w^^Pt*- 
the Rules of the Board of Trade so long as the said warehouse shall 
continue to be a regular warehouse, but the term for which any ware- Termof x«cular 
house is declared a regular warehouse to issue such receipts shall be ^'•'•**°''**- 
limited to and expire on the first day of July in each year. No receipts 
issued on grain received in any warehouse shall be regular for delivery 
under the Rules of the Board of Trade after that date unless the ware- 
house upon which it has been issued has again been declared a regular 
warehouse by the Board of Directors; provided, however, that receipts 
issued before the first day of July by warehouses which have been.jj|^ ^^ ^^^^ 
regular warehouses during the preceding year, but which have not house reoeipts. 
been declared regular for the succeeding year, shall be regular for 
delivery upon such contracts for six months after the first day of 
July; but nothing contained herein shall prevent the Board of Directors 
from declaring any warehouse, or the receipts thereof, irregtdar at 



42 



CRuuXXL] 



Bmergcnflj 
•1*1 



Limitation of 

•ggre^te 

•apaeity of 

warebouoes 

mftd« regular 

under 

•mergeaoy 



any time for violation or non-compliance with the laws of the State 
of Illinois or any of the Rules of the Board of Trade or of the Regu- 
lations and Requirements of the Board of Directors. 

Provided^ that the Board of Directors shall have power, when in 
their judgment an emergency exists reqtiiring more storage room 
than can be supplied by the regular elevator warehouses, or because 
of an inability to obtain insurance on grain stored therein, to declare 
any storehouses, vessels, or places suitable for the storage of grain or 
flax seed within the Chicago Switching District — ^wherdn the cost of 
delivery to vessels or railroad cars shall not be greater than such as 
is made by the regular elevators for the same service — to be regular 
places for the storage of grain deliverable under* the Rtiles of the 
Board of Trade. 

x\nd provided further, that in case it shall happen that at any time 
there shall be no warehouses which shall be regular warehouses for the 
storage of grain and flax seed, then the Board of Directors may declare 
any warehouses suitable for the storage of grain or flax seed, whose 
aggregate capacity shall not exceed twenty-five million (25,000,000) 
bushels, regular warehouses for the storage of grain or flax seed, upon 
such terms and for such period as the Board of Directors in its dis- 
cretion may deem necessary or proper, and the warehouse receipts 
issued by warehouses so declared regtilar under this proviso, shall be 
regular for delivery on contracts under the Rules of the Board of 
Trade, in the same manner as if issued by warehouses declared regular 
under the foregoing provisions of this section in regard to declaring 
warehouses regular for the term ending on the first day of July in 
each year. 

All complaints against elevator proprietors under this section 
shall be heard and decided by the Board of Directors of the Board of 
Trade of the City of Chicago. 

Sec. 2. All deliveries of grain and flax seed in 1,000 and 5.000 
bushel lots; of mess pork, lard or s. p. hams, in 50 and 250 package 
lots; or of meats in lots of 25,000 and 50,000 lbs., in store, on time 
contracts, shall be made between 9:30 a. m. and 11:00 o'clock a. m., 
at the office of the clearing member who has the property bought, or 
shall be made in the Exchange Hall, or in such other place as may 
be designated by the Board of Directors between the hours of 1:30 
and 2:00 o'clock p. m., except as hereinafter provided. All such 
deliveries shall be made by a notice in writing, which notice shall 
Form of notice, state on its face the place of business of its issuer. Such notice shall 
state in detail the warehouse receipts proposed to be delivered, and 
in the case of provisions in packages, or lard, the packer's brand, and 
the contract price on which delivery is proposed to be made, also the 
net cash value (deducting extra storage) of said property at the 
market price. Twice each day at stated hours, it shall be the duty 
of the Secretary to post or cause to be posted, in a suitable place, the 
market price of such grain or provisions as are deliverable on time 
contracts. The first price posted shall be applicable to deliveries 
between 9:30 o'clock and 11:00 o'clock A. m. The second price 
posted shall be applicable to deliveries between 1:30 and 2:00 o'clock 
p. M. Such delivery notice may be passed from one purchaser to 
another before 11:00 o'clock a. m., or before 2:00 o'clock p. u., as the 



Deliveriee, 
when and 
wliere made 



Deeeription of 
procedure. 



IRuuZZLI 



43 



case may be, by indorsement thereon by the seller, of the name of the 
party to whom it is to be delivered, together with the contract price 
at which the property is sold, and also the time at which the delivery 
is made. In the case of deliveries made outside of the buyer's office, 
as provided above, the first delivery of such notice shaU be made 
before 1:35 o'clock p. m., and any party holding such notice longer 
than five minutes as shown by the indorsement on same of the time 
of the previous delivery, shall not be permitted to deliver it. 
Provided, however, that on the last business day of any month a party 
having grain bought in 1,000 bushel lots and sold in 5,000 bushel lots 
may deUver five 1,000 bushel lots on 5,000 bushel lot contracts not later 
thaii five minutes after having received the last 1,000 bushel lot, by 
attaching the five notices firmly to each other and making the usual 
endorsement upon the last notice, as hereinbefore provided. Any 
person indorsing upon said notices any fictitious name or the name 
of any person, firm or corporation other than that of the person, firm 
or corporation to whom he tenders the notice upon a bona fide sale of 
the property mentioned therein, actually made by himself, or the firm, 
or the corporation he represents, or upon the written order of another 
member, firm, or corporation on whose behalf he makes such tender, 
or who shall make any alteration therein, or any substitution of 
property other than that originally named in the notice by the original 
issuer thereof, shall be deemed guilty of gross fraud, and, if a member, 
he shall be suspended or expeUed, at the discretion of the Board of 
Directors; and if not a member, such person shall be permanently 
excluded from the rooms of the Association. All delivery notices 
issued tmder this rule shall be consecutively numbered by the parties 
issuing them. Notices of readiness to deliver property as herein 
provided, and all subsequent transfers of such notices, shall be deemed 
and held to be a valid and sufficient tender of property, on time con- 
tracts, tmder the Rules of this Board of Trade, provided the property 
is actually delivered, or is shown to have been ready for delivery, in 
the manner and upon the terms herein provided. It shall be the duty 
of the party regularly holding such notice at 2:00 o'clock p. m., to 
present the same at the office of the issuer before 2:30 o'clock p. m., 
and of the party regularly holding such notice at 11:00 o'clock a. m. 
to present the same at the office of its issuer before 11:30 o'clock 
A. M. of the same day, together with a certified check on some Chicago 
bank in good standing, or other satisfactory payment for the net 
amount due for the property represented by any or all of said notices, 
at the market price; and upon tendering said notice, or notices, with 
payment, at the office of its issuer, the holder of said notice or notices, Differaoeai, 
«hall be entitled to receive the property represented by same. AllJ^^gJj"** 
differences due from, or to parties to such delivery shall be paid upon based, 
the basis of a full delivery, and no more, and each purchaser receiving 
notice of delivery, shall be responsible to the seller from whom the 
notice was received, for the difference between the price actually paid 
for the property and their contract price. In cases where the seller's 
contract price is less than the price actually paid for the property, 
such seller shall be responsible to the purchaser to whom he delivered 
the notice, for the difference. All such differences shall be due and 
payable immediately upon the delivery and payment for the actual 
property; it being the duty of each person traxisf erring the delivery 
notice to ascertain what price was actually paid for the property. 

On the first business day of each month all deliveries on time p*'i]|2'^M Ani 
contracts d the kinds of property mentioned in this section, if delivered ^'^^'^^ 



44 



[Ruu XZI.] 



before 11:00 o'clock a. m., shall be delivered in the Exchange Hall, or 
such other place as may be designated by the Board of Directors, 
between the hours of 8:30 and 9:15 o'clock a. m., in the same manner 
and under the same regulations, except as hereinafter provided, as 
is specified for similar deliveries after 11 00 o'clock a. m. The delivery 
FoBB of notiee. notice shall be of the same form and character in all respects as that 
prescribed for deliveries between 1:30 and 2:00 o'clock p. m., except 
that it shall state the net value (deducting extra storage) of the 
property at the closing market price on the last business day of the 
previous month, for the delivery on which the property is tendered, 
which price shall be posted in a suitable place immediately after the 
close of the market. The first delivery of the notice shall be not 
later than 8:35 o'clock a. m., and it shall be the duty of the party 
regularly holding such notice at 9:15 o'clock a. m. to present the same 
at the office of its issuer before 11:00 o'clock a. m. of the same day, 
together with a certified check on some Chicago bank, in good stand- 
ing, or other satisfactory payment, for the net amount due for the 
property represented by said notice, as hereinbefore provided, and 
upon tendering said notice with payment at the office of the issuer, 
the holder of such notice shall be entitled to receive the property 
represented by the same. 

All differences between* the price paid for the property and any 
Mode of settle- contract prices involved in its delivery, due to or from parties to such 
delivery, shall be adjusted and paid in the same manner and with the 
same liabilities as in the case of delivery made under this section 
between 1:30 and 2:00 o'clock p. m. In case property represented by 
Default either of the delivery notices mentioned in this section is not called 

and paid for as herein provided, it may be held by the issuer of the 
notice, for and at the expense for storage, interest, insurance and 
other risk of the party whom it may concern, tmtil 12:00 o'clock m. 
of the next business day, at which time it shall be sold in open market 
for account of whom it may concern; or it may be sold, if the notice 
was delivered before 9:15 o'clock a. m., or before 11:00 o'clock a. m., 
at any time between 12:30 o'clock p. m. of that day and 12:00 o'clock 
M. of the next business day. If the notice was delivered between 
1:30 o'clock p. m. and 2:00 o'clock p. M., it may be sold at any time 
between the beginning of trading hours and 12:00 o'clock m. of the 
next business day. The party holding the property shall, however. 
Notification on notify the party to whom he delivered the original delivery notice, 
before 2:00 o'clock p. m. of the same day of the default, if the delivery 
notice was delivered before 9:15 o'clock a. m. or before 11:00 o'clock 
A. M.; or before 4:00 o'clock p. m., if the delivery notice was delivered 
between 1 :30 o'clock p. M. and 2:00 o'clock p. m., such notice of default 
to be in writing; and each purchaser receiving said notice of default 
shall in turn deliver the same, without delay, to the party to whom 
RaBponsibility he passed the original notice of proposed delivery. All expense and 
^defaulting j.jgj^ ^f carrying property defaulted on, including a commission of one- 
quarter of one cent per bushel on grain, and one-quarter of one per 
cent on the market value of provisions, shall be payable to the party 
required to make resale, by the party to whom he had the property 



IRuu XXI.] 



45 



sold, he to be reimbursed by the one to whom he delivered the notice 
of delivery and so on until it is finally paid by the party in default. 
And in case of such default and resale of property all differences shall 
be adjusted as hereinbefore provided, on the basis of the price at 
which the property shall have been resold. All parties having property 
due them on time sales shall be present, or shall be represented by an partiM to be 
authorized employe, in the Exchange Hall, or such other place as may SfdeEverii*™* 
be designated by the Board of Directors, between the hours of 1:30 
and 2:00 o'clock p. m. of each business day, and on days when the 
Board adjourns at 12:00 o'clock m., between the hours of 12:30 and 
1 :00 o'clock p. M., and on the first business day of each month between 
the hours of 8:30 and 9 :15 o'clock a. m. ; and admission to the Exchange 
Hall, or such other place as may be designated by the Board of Direc- 
tors, shall be denied all parties after 1:30, 12:30 o'clock p. m. or 8:30 
o'clock A. M., as the case may be. Any property which cannot be 
delivered owing to the absence of the buyer from the Exchange Hall, 
or such other place as the Directors may have designated for the pur- 
pose of delivery, may be sold out by the party having same sold to 
such absentee, as hereinbefore provided in cases of default ; all expenses 
and risk of carrying the property, commissions, etc., shall be paid by 
the absentee, the same as in case of default; provided, however, such 
property shall not be sold until the absentee has had notice in writings 
either delivered to him in person, to his business representative, at 
his place of business, or left at the Secretary's office in case he has no 
regular place of business, that the property was ready for delivery 
under this Rule on his contract. In case it should appear on com- 
plaint duly made to the Board of Directors that any member has been 
guilty of issuing a notice of readiness to deliver property as herein 
provided, who had not the property mentioned in such notice, in his 
control or possession at the time of issuing such notice, or, having 
issued such notice, shall thereafter dispose of the property, except as 
herein provided, or who refuses to deliver up such property when 
demanded, as provided for under this Rule, such party shall be deemed 
guilty of gross fraud, and shall be suspended or expelled from mem- 
bership in this Association, under the provisions of Rule IV. 

Provided, however, that on all Saturdays when there is a regular DeUveries 
business session of the Association, all deliveries shall be made in the jj^^^*^** 
Exchange Hall ; a morning delivery between the hours of 8 :30 o'clock a* 12 m. 
and 9:15 o'clock a. m., in the same manner and under the same regu- 
lations, except as hereinafter provided, as is specified for similar 
deliveries after 11:00 o'clock a. m. The delivery notice shall be of 
the same form and character in all respects as that prescribed for 
deliveries between 1:30 and 2:00 o'clock p. m., except that it shall 
state the net value, deducting extra storage of the property at the 
closing market price on the immediately preceding business day, for 
the delivery on which the property is tendered, which price shall be 
posted in a suitable place immediately after the close of the market. 
The first delivery of the notice shall not be made later than 8:35 
o'clock A. M., and it shall be the duty of the party regularly holding 
such notice at 9:15 o'clock a. m. to present the same at the office of 



46 



{RoiaXXL 



Form and 

delivery 
notice and 
time of its 
preeentatioii. 



Power of 
Secretary (o 
extend 
deliyeriee on 
laat busineei 
day of month 



Parahr 
teehnioal 
proviaioneno 
pretext for the 
AToidanoe <^ 
oontraotiud 
obligatiooa 
under thia 
nde^ 



its issuer before 11:00 o'clock a. m. of the same day. together with 
certified check on some Chicago bank in good standing, or other 
satisfactory payment, for the net amount due for property repre- 
sented by said notice, as hereinbefore provided; and upon tendering 
said notice with payment at the office of the issuer, the holder of such 
notice shall be entitled to receive the property represented by the 
same ; and also, on such Saturdays, as fall on the last business day of 
the month when there is a regular business session of this Association, 
an afternoon delivery between 12:30 and 1.00 o'clock p. m., in the 
same manner and under the same regulations, except as hereinafter 
provided, as is specified in similar deliveries after 11:00 o'clock a. m. 
The delivery notice shall be of the same form and character in all 
respects as that prescribed for deliveries after 11:00 o'clock a. ii. 
The first delivery of the notice shall not be later than 12:35 o'clock 
p. M., and it shall be the duty of the party regularly holding such notice 
at 1:00 o'clock p. m. to present the same at the office of its issuer 
before 11:00 o'clock a. m. of the next following banking day, together 
with certified check on some Chicago bank in good standing, or other 
satisfactory payment, for the net face value of the property repre- 
sented by said notice, without adding anything additional for interest 
or insurance, or without deducting any additional storage for the 
period between the time of delivery and the time of actual payment. 

And provided further, that on the last business day of any month, 
when deliveries of articles mentioned in this Section are made after 
11:00 o'clock A. M., the Secretary of the Board, or any person acting 
under his direction, shall have the power to extend the time for such 
deliveries from 2:00 o'clock p. m. (if on a Saturday, from 1:00 o'clock 
p. M.), as often and to such time during that day as in his judgment 
it may be necessary to enable all, who are prepared to do so, to tender 
or receive delivery notices. When any extension of time is made 
under this proviso, it shall be announced in the Exchange Hall, or in 
such other place as may be designated by the Board of Directors for 
the purpose of making deliveries, on or before the expiration of the 
time hereinbefore stated for the termination of such deliveries; in the 
event of the extension of the time for deliveries as herein provided, 
wherever the time stated in this rule would be affected by such exten- 
sion, such time shall in all cases be correspondingly extended. 

It is the object and intent of this Section that all contracts for the 
purchase and for the sale of commodities mentioned therein shall be 
carried out in absolute good faith, it being expressly understood that 
in construing this Section its purely techincal provisions — ^the princi- 
pal purpose of which is to facilitate deliveries — must not be used as a 
pretext to evade the obligations of a contract. Any violation, how- 
ever, of any of the provisions of this Section with intent to thwart or 
impede deliveries shall be deemed dishonorable conduct under the 
provisions of Section 9 of Rule IV of the Rules of the Board of Trade 
of the City of Chicago. 



Dlreeton 



warehouae 
regolationa. 



Sbc. 3. The Board of Directors may prescribe all necessary 
xc^gulations and requirements for warehousing all kinds of pi o p e ilj f 
(other than grain) deliverable by warehouse receipts. 



re 



RULB XXI,] 



47 



Sbc. 4. It shall be the duty of the Board of Directors, under Poctlnc 

elevaton and 
this Rule, to publish annually, or oftener if necessary, by posting on w»i»hou«#. 

the bulletin of the Exchange, the names of all elevators and other 

warehouses contorming in all respects to prescribed requirements of 

said Board ; and to report immediately to the Association, by posting Pontine 

as above, any irregularity in the management of such elevators or ^^*"*'^*'*'' 

warehouses, or any fact calculated to discredit or impair^the value of 

warehouse receipts of any such elevators or warehouses, as the same 

shall come to their knowledge. 

Sec. 5. All warehouse receipts for property tendered or delivered 



raocipti 

on contracts shall be for quantities or parcels, in the aggregate, as 

sold; accompanied by a memorandum of the property delivered, 
with the price of the same, together with the amount due therefor, 

provided, that on all time contracts of five thousand (5,000) bushels 
of grain or flaxseed, or any multiple thereof, deliveries shall be made 
in lots of five thousand (5,000) bushels; and on all time contracts for 
mess pork, sweet pickled hams, or lard, for two hundred and fifty 
(250) packages, or any multiple thereof, deliveries shall be made in 
lots of two hundred and fifty (250) packages; and on all time con- 
tracts for fifty thousand (50,000) pounds of meats, or any mtiltiple 
thereof, deliveries shall be made in lots of fifty thousand (50,000) 
pounds; and on all time contracts for one thousand (1,000) bushels 
of grain or flax seed, or any multiple thereof, except as provided 
above, deliveries shall be made in lots of one thousand (1,000) bushels; 
and on all time contracts for mess pork, sweet pickled hams, or lard, 
for fifty (50) packages, or any multiple thereof, except as provided 
above, deliveries shall be made in lots of fifty (50) packages; and on 
all time contracts for twenty-five thousand (25,000) pounds of meats, 
or any multiple thereof, except as provided above, deliveries shall be 
made in lots of twenty-five thousand (25,000) pounds; a variation, 
however, of one per cent in the quantity of grain or flaxseed delivered, 
and that contracted for, shall not vitiate a tender or delivery. Any 
excess or deficit within the above limits shall be settled for at the cur- 
rent market upon the day of delivery. 

No individual, firm or corporation shall make tender upon con- 
tracts for grain or flaxseed as hereinbefore provided until such grain 
or flaxseed is covered by insurance to at least 85 per cent of their 
market value, such insurance to cover ptirchaser until 12 o'clock noon 
of the next business day after the day of delivery, provided, upon 
request of purchaser on day of delivery seller shall give purchaser 
an order for the cancellation and rewriting for the purchaser of such 
insurance to the extent of 85 per cent of the market value of the 
property so delivered, and the seller shall pay premiums on any 
insurance thus designated until noon of the next business day follow- 
ing delivery. 



48 



[RuLB XXL] 



FORM FOR DESIGNATION. 



Chicago, lU 19... 



The insurance hereunder is hereby designated for the 
sole use and benefit of accord- 
ing to its terms. It is to be cancelled as of 12 o'clock noon 
to-morrow or next business day, and rewritten for him or them. 
Return premium to be paid to 



All fire insurance policies, binders or other written evidence of 
insurance used for the insurance of grain or flaxseed in warehouses 
and elevators made regular under the laws of Illinois and the rules 
and regulations of this Association, shall in addition to the provisions 
ordinarily found in such policies contain the following clause and 
form of indorsement: 

Loss, if any, to be adjusted with asstired named herein and 
payable to assured or order hereon. In event of sale and delivery 
of the property insured hereunder, this policy will, if so desig- 
nated in writing by the assured and such writing filed with the 
agent of this Company, on day of such delivery, remain in full 
force and effect for the sole use and benefit of the purchaser of 
the identical property described, until 12 o'clock noon of the 
next business day succeeding the delivery of the property. 
(Only payment in full by check or otherwise, and delivery of 
warehouse receipts on day specified, shall constitute a delivery 
as above described.) 

Until 12 o'clock noon of the next business day as described 
above, the said purchaser so designated shall be recognized as the 
assured in all respects, but from and after that time, this policy 
shall be void as to any person claiming hereunder, except for 
return of the unearned premium thereon, after deducting the 
usual short rate earned premium for the entire time it shall have 
been in force. The unearned premium shall be payable to the 
original assured or order hereon. This insurance shall cease and 
become void, so far as the original assured is concerned, im- 
mediately upon delivery of the cancellation order to the pur- 

haser of the property, and cannot be extended by the pur- 

haaer to protect any other party. 



[Rvu XXI.] 



49 



In the event of the delivery of insurance in Companies, Lloyds, 
or Associations, commonly known as "Surplus Line" insurance, the 
individual, firm, or corporation accepting delivery may demand 
policies in stock Companies, duly licensed to transact business in 
the State of Illinois, and the individual, firm, or corporation making 
delivery shall forthwith exchange such "Surplus Line" insurance 
for insurance in duly licensed Companies as aforesaid, Provided, 
such individual, firm, or corporation holds insurance in duly licensed 
Companies not used as a warranty or basis for other insurance 
contracts. 



PENALTY. 

Any member, firm, or corporation who purchases and holds fire 
insurance on grain or flaxseed in any regular elevator without own- 
ing or holding warehouse receipts on grain or flaxseed in said 
elevators, with intent to thwart or impede deliveries, shall be deemed 
guilty of dishonorable conduct under the provisions of* Section 9 of 
Rule 4, Provided, however, that nothing herein shall be construed as 
forbidding the retention of such insurance from day to day when not 
in excess of ordinary and reasonable business requirements. 

Sbo. 6. All sales of flaxseed, tmless otherwise agreed, are made yyi^ ^^ ^^^ 
upon the basis of pure seed, that is : Seed tendered or delivered on ■••**• ''■•^ °'' 
contracts may carry impurity or foreign matter, but must contain the 
sale quantity of pure seed, and for such pure seed only shall payment 
be required. 

The Board of Directors shall also appoint a competent person as j^^^j^j^^^ ^^ 
Registrar of Flaxseed, whose duty it shall be to provide and cause to A*"**!, eto. 
be kept suitable books, in which shall be registered all warehouse 
receipts for flaxseed issued as "regular," or for "regular delivery'* of 
such property under the rules of the Board of Trade; such receipts, 
after being so registered, shall be stamped or written across their face 
the word "Registered," and the date of such registry, and signed, in 
writing, by the said Registrar, or some person duly authorized by him 
for that service. All such warehouse receipts issued from or by each 
warehouse, or other place of storage, shall be consecutively numbered, 
and no receipts of duplicate numbers issued from the same place of 
storage shall be registered. No second warehouse receipt for the 
same property shall be registered imless the original is presented at 
e mhite tand its registration canceled by the Registrar. 



50 



tROLU 



ORnoeUation of No flaxseed shall be removed from the place of storage indicated 
^S^li^e'" by any registered receipt issued to represent it until the registration 

delivery. q£ such receipt has first been canceled in the office of the Registrar of 

Flaxseed by writing or stamping across its face the words** Registration 

canceled." 

WarefaouM Sec. 7. No warehouse receipts for flaxseed shall be registered 

fli^xa^ — except such as have been issued by or from a warehouse or place of 
tMued^onlyby storage declared to be a regular warehouse for the storage of such 
warehouse. property by the Board of Directors of the Board of Trade. 



RULE XXII. 



ContFaotfl — 
buyer's 
demand as to 
time. 



When 
deliverable. 



When no 
demand shall 
be made. 



Gontraots-^ 
seller's 
pleasure 
as to time. 



RIGHTS OP PARTIES ON CONTRACTS. 

Section 1. On time contracts made between members of the 
Association, where property is bought, deliverable on the buyer's 
demand within a specified time, the time of delivery shall be as follows: 
When demand for the property is made by the buyer before 12K)0 
o'clock M., the property shall be due and deliverable before 2:00 o'clock 
p. M. same day. When the demand is made after 12:00 o'clock m., 
the property shall be due and deliverable before 2:00 o'clock p. m. 
same day, or before 11:00 o'clock a. m. next day. Or the buyer may 
specify any particular future day during the time when the property 
is deliverable, upon which the property shall be delivered, and the 
property shall be delivered before 11:00 o'clock a. m. on the day 
designated; provided, no demand shall be made before the begininng 
of the time specified, when it may be made; and if no demand is made 
the property shall be deliverable before 2:00 o'clock p. m. on the day 
of maturity of contract; and provided, also, that all deliveries after 
11:00 o'clock A. M. shall be made under the provisions of Section 2 of 
Rule XXI. 

Sec. 2. On contracts for property deliverable at the pleasure of 
the seller, within a specified time, the seller may deliver the property 
on any day during such time, between the hours of 9 :00 and 1 1 :00 a. m., 
or between the hours of 1:30 and 2:00 p. m., as provided by Section 2 
of Rule XXI. 



Toider of 
wheat on 
contracts. 



Sec 3. On contracts for grain or flaxseed for future delivery the 
tender of a higher grade of the same kind of grain or flaxseed than the 
one contracted for shall be deemed sufficient. All contracts made 
for Wheat hereafter, unless otherwise specified, shall be understood 
as for **Contract" wheat, and on such contracts a tender of No. 1 
Red Winter Wheat, No. 2 Red Winter Wheat, No. 1 Northern Spring 
Wheat, No. 1 Hard Winter Wheat, or No. 2 Hard Winter Wheat, in 
such proportions as may be convenient to the seller, subject, however, 
to the provisions of Section 5 of Rule XXI, shall be deemed a valid 
tender. To take effect on October 1, 1908. 

All contracts for com, unless otherwise specified, shall be under- 
stood as for **Contract" com, and on such contracts a tender of No. 1 
Com, No. 1 White Com, No. 1 Yellow Com No. 2 Com. No. 2 White 



Suuxxn.) 



51 



Com, No. 2 Yellow Com, and on and after July 1, 1905, a tender of 
No. 3 Com, No. 3 White Com, and No. 3 Yellow Com, in such pro- 
portions as may be convenient to the seller, subject, however, to the 
provisions of Section 5, of Rule XXI, shall be deemed a valid tender; 
provided, however, that No. 3 Com, No. 3 White Com, and No. 3 
Yellow Com can be delivered as "Contract" com only at a deduction 
of five cents per bushel from the contract price. 

All contracts for oats, unless otherwise specified, shall be under- Tender of oat« 

on oontraets. 
stood as for "Contract' oats, and on such contracts a tender of No. 1 

White Oats, No. 2 White Oats, No. 3 White Oats, or Standard Oats, 
in such proportions as may be convenient to the seller; subject, how- 
ever, to the provisions of Section 5 of Rule XXI of the Rules of the 
Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, shall be deemed a valid tender 
of "Contract" oats; provided, however, that No. 3 White Oats can be 
delivered as "Contract" oats only at a deduction of five cents per 
bushel from the contract price. 

Sec. 4. When a contract shall mature on Sunday or on a legal Sundays or 
holiday, delivery on such contract shall be made on the preceding 
business day. No property shall be tendered on any day upon which '^"\f.?JJ . 
the Association shall hold no business session. 

Sec. 5. On contracts for grain sold in store without special agree- Delivety of 
ment as to delivery, the property shall be delivered before 2:30 o'clock JJJ^ '^^^ ^ 
p. M. of the day of sale, or before 11:00 o'clock a. m. of the next busi- 
ness day, except as hereinafter provided. In case a purchase is Delivery of 
specified as for cash, it shall, if purchased before 1 : 15 p. m., be delivered ***** «**»'*. 
before 2:30 o'clock p. m. same day, except as hereinafter provided. 
No property shall be tendered between the hours of 11 :00 o'clock a. m. 
and 1:15 o'clock p. m., except on Saturdays, unless by special agree- 
ment. All deliveries under this section on Saturday shall be made 
before 12:00 o'clock m. In case of the tender of property during theTenden during 
temporary absence of the purchaser from his place of business, notice jSw** **' 
of such tender shall be left at his office, and he shall have the right to 
call for the same, and pay for it, within one hour thereafter. 

Sec. 6. In case it shall appear that the delivery of any outstand- Settlementof 
ing trade or contract between members of the Association may be offset, 
offset by some other corresponding trade or contract, made by the 
parties with other members of the Association, and the parties to 
such trade or contract, or their authorized agents, consent to such 
offset, such trade or contract shall be deemed to have been settled, 
and any balance between the ctirrent market value of the property 
covered by such trade or contract, and the several contract prices 
shall be due and payable immediately by the party from whom such 
balance may be due to the party entitled to receive the same under 
his contract. The current market value of the property contracted JJ»A«jTjj3* 
for shall be conspicuously posted, at a stated hour each day, under 
the direction of the Board of Directors, in the Exchange Hall and in 
the settlement room of the Board, which posting shall serve as a 
basis for the adjustment of all contracts settled, as herein provided 
on that day. 



52 



[RuuiXXIL] 



Adiustment In order to facilitate the operation of this section, each member 

Mttlement!^ is required to keep a settlement book in which shall be entered the 
names of parties with whom settlements have been made, and the dates 
and terms of the trades included in such settlements, and the terms 
of such settlements, and the prices at which the commodities were 
originally sold or purchased, and the amounts due to or from him or 
them on each separate settlement, also the net amount due to or from 
(t|Qi^j^ him or them on all settlements; and the Board of Directors is hereby 

HouM. authorized to provide a suitable office, with the necessary employes, 

to which members shall be required, at stated hours each day, to 
R«porU. make reports, showing the net balance due to or from each member, 

as shown by such settlement book, and also the general balance due 
to or from him or them upon all such settlements; each report to be 
accompanied with an acceptable check for the aggregate of balances, 
if any, due from him or them on the contracts so settled; whereupon, 
if said report is found to be correct, as compared with other reports 
rendered him, the person in charge of said office shall, at a stated hour 
each day, pay to each of the parties making such reports any balances 
which he may have collected, and which shall appear to be due to them 
by said reports, less such charges as shall be prescribed by the Board 
of Directors as compensation for the services of said office. 

GonfirmatioD ^^c. 7. It shall be the duty of each member or firm making a 

fo*fSS«**"** transaction for future delivery of grain or flaxseed in 5,000 or 1,000 
delivery, eto. bushel lots, lard and pork in 250 or 50 package lots, and D. S. short 
ribs and D. S. extra short clears in lots of 50,000 or 25,000 poundst 
under the Rules of the Association, to confirm such transaction by 
sending to the Clearing House a memorandum of the same by 6:00 
o'clock p. M. of the day on which it is made; such memorandum shall 
be in writing, and shall state on its face the date of the transaction, 
the quantity and kind of property covered by the same, the month of 
delivery, the price, and the name of the party to whom sold or of 
whom bought, and shall be signed by the party or firm making the 
same. All transactions of the same date made with any member or 
firm may be included in one memorandum, and all such memoranda 
shall be sent to the Clearing House by the member or firm making the 
same, in unsealed envelopes addressed to the member or firm with 
whom such transactions were made. It shall be the duty of the 
Clearing House Manager to assort and have ready for delivery by 
8:00 o'clock a. m. of the following day, and to deliver, on application, 
all envelopes containing such memoranda as are left with him in com- 
pliance with this section. In order to enforce this section, it is hereby 
provided that any member or firm failing to comply with its pro- 
visions, shall be fined $5.00 for each offense, and for repeated offenses 
they may be disciplined by the Directors under the provisions of 
Section 9 of Rule IV. 

Oonfiimatian Sbc. 8. It shall be the duty of each member or firm making an 

by offset. offset of any outstanding contract for future delivery, to confirm the 

same by sending to the Clearing House a memorandum of the same by 

6:00 o'clock p. m. of the day on which it is made; such memorandum 

shall be in writing, and shall state on its face the date of the offset and 



[RuxJi TTTT.l 



53 



the amount proposed to be paid or collected. When several offsets 
have been made on any one day, the memorandum shall state the net 
amount only of the proposed payments or collections; such memoranda 
shall be sent to the Clearing House by the member or firm making the 
same, in unsealed envelopes addressed to the member or firm with 
whom such transactions were made. It shall be the duty of the 
Clearing House Manager to assort and have ready for delivery by 
8:00 o'clock a. m. of the following day, and to deliver on application, 
all envelopes containing such memoranda as are left with him in 
compliance with this section. In order to enforce this section it is 
hereby provided that any member or firm failing to comply with its 
provisions shall be fined $5.00 for each offense, and for repeated offenses 
they may be disciplined by the Directors under the provisions of 
Section 9, of Rule IV. 

Sec. 9. In case any member of this Association, acting as a com- 
mission merchant, shall have made a purchase or sale by order and for 
account of another, whether the party for whom any such purchase 
or sale was made be a member of this Association or not, said member 
shall be deemed authorized to settle such contract through the 
Exchange Clearing House of this Association, and under the Rules ciearins Houae 
and Regulations relating to such Clearing House; and the Board o^SSiSi^^eof 
Directors of this Association are authorized to establish Rules and Trapsaotions 
Regulations governing the Exchange Clearing House of this Asso- rul«f and* * 
ciation, and to change, add to, or modify such Rules and Regulations ^K^l^tions 
from time to time. In case any member of this Association, acting 
as a commission merchant, shall have made purchases or sales by 
order and for accoimt of another, whether the party for whom such 
purchase or sale was made be a member of this Association or not, 
such order shall be deemed to have been made with reference to, and 
to be executed and carried out in all respects under the Rules, Regu- 
lations and Customs of this Association (including the Exchange 
Clearing House Regulations) the same as though they were in terms 
incorporated into such order; provided, that in case of substitution of 
one contract for another, or of offsets or settlements of contracts in 
ptirsuance of such Rules, Regulations or Customs, the member or firm 
making the same shall be beld to guarantee to his or their principal 
the ultimate fulfillment of the original contract made under such 
order, and the principal also continuing liable on such original con- 
tract, the same as though no substitution, offset or settlement were 
made. 

Sec. 10. Any offer to buy. or sell on a time contract any com- Often to buy 
modity dealt in under the Rules of this Association by a member of w^ith th«*** * 
the Association, when made openly in the Exchange Hall during the ™*°^|^ ^^^ 
hours for regvdar trading, may be accepted by any other member of 
the Association at the time such offer was made, and the contract shall 
be made with the member first accepting such offer. 

Sec. 11. No member shall give the name of a corporation as his 
principal on any trade or contract made in conformity with the Rules 
and Regtilations of this Association unless the President and Secretary 
of such corporation are both members of this Association in good 



54 



(RnuiXZn. 



Liability of standing. In case the said corporation is accepted by the other party 
ponSiona.*"^ ^ such trade or contract and defaults in the execution of the same on 
its part, or fails to comply with the terms of any business obligation 
made in conformity with the Rules and Regulations of this Association 
on which the said corporation has become liable, the President and 
Secretary of such corporation and such other officers and managers 
of such corporation as shall be members of this Association, shall be 
subject to be disciplined in the same manner as they are subject to 
be disciplined for failure to comply with the terms of any business 
obligation of their own; and in case of such default or failure on the 
part of said corporation, it shall be suspended from the privileges of 
the Clearing House until all its outstanding obligations to members 
of this Association shall have been settled. 

ObUptionto Sbc. 12. Whenever a member of the Association, acting on his 

aotioM^nuIde!*" ^^'^^ behalf or as the representative of a firm or corporation, shall 
have made a purchase or sale for another party for future delivery 
of contract grades of commodities dealt in on the Exchange, such 
member or the firm or corporation of which he is the representative, as 
the case may be, shall notify the party for whom such purchase or 
sale was made, of the price at which and the party with whom such 
purchase or sale was made, such notice to be in writing and to be 
given upon the day of such purchase or sale. A non-compliance with 
the requirements of this section shall be deemed uncommercial con- 
PwaHgr. duct and punishable, in the discretion of the Board of Directors, by 

suspension or expulsion from membership in this Association under 
the provisions of Rule IV. 

Such non-compliance shall not invalidate any such contract or 
purchase or sale. 

No. of buBhab Sbc. 13. In all sales of oats for future delivery, a carload shall be 
p^^lmd Med deemed to contain 1,500 bushels; of wheat, com, rye and barley, 1,000 

bushels; and, on and after December 10, 1907, of flaxseed, 650 bushels; 

of timothy, Hungarian millet and clover seed, 36,000 pounds. 
Sale* to arrlTe, ^^ ^ sales to arrive, in the absence of a specific agreement as to 
time for ship- time foT shipment or delivery — ^fifteen days arrival shall govern; and 

in case of excess or deficit on such sales, the excess or deficit shall be 

settled for on the basis of the fair market price of such grade on the 
Case of exoeH day on which the excess or deficit is ascertained and made known to 
or deficit. each party. 

In case property of any kind is weighed by a Board of Trade or 

disinterested weigher and is paid for in accordance with such weights, 
Ooet to be peid*^^ ^^^* °^ ^**^^ weighing shall be borne by the seller, provided such 
for weighins. cost does not exceed 25 cents per car; should such cost be in excess of 

25 cents per car it shall be divided equally between the buyer and 

seller. 
Oblivion to It shall be the duty of members of this Board, or of firms or cor- 

^^rwted*' porations represented in its membership, either acting as commission 
eeitlfioatea of merchants in the sale of grain or flaxseed on the Chicago market, or 
^ ' ' acting as purchasers of grain or flaxseed at country points, when 

Chicago weights are the basis of settlement, to furnish the consignor 

or seller, as the case may be, a Board of Trade or disinterested cer- 



{RaiM ZZII.] 



55 



tificate of weights. The proportion of the cost of such weighing paid 
by the commission merchant or purchaser, in accordance with the 
provisions of this section, shall be charged to the consignor or seller. 

Sec. 14. Whenever grain or mill feed is sold by sample, the pur- OonditioM of 
chaser must accept or reject such grain or mill feed by 11:00 o'clock reSSion^f**' 
A. If. of the business day next succeeding the day of purchase, unless FJ^V^ ®' "***' 
it shall have been impossible for an official Board of Trade sampler to 
sample such grain or mill feed by that time. If it be impossible to 
sample such grain or mill feed within the time specified it shsdl be the 
duty of the purchaser to notify the seller by 11:00 a. m. of the business 
day next succeeding the day of purchase, and such grain or mill feed 
shall be sampled as soon as possible thereafter by the official grain 
sampler, and the purchaser must accept or reject such grain or mill 
feed immediately after the report of the official sampler is made. 

It shall be the duty of the seller to notify the buyer at the time l>«ty of seller 
of sale (or on arrival, if sold to arrive), when grain is graded subject rice^ven^ 
to approval, and upon such notification or upon the delivery of the 
t fficial sample obtained by the buyer, it shall be the duty of the buyer 
to notify the seller of his intention to demand a clean certificate of 
inspection. When sales are made by sample and the official sampler 
reports cars *'too full for thorough examination," it shall be the duty of 
the buyer to notify the seller of such fact before 11 :00 o'clock a. m. of 
the business day next succeeding the day of purchase, and of his inten- 
tion to re-examine such cars at time of unloading or transfer. 

Whenever grain, mill feed or seeds are sold to be switched or P"*3j of seller 
delivered to connecting lines, or when sold for shipment beyond iptin. etc.. for 
Chicago, it shall be the duty of the seller to order such property in* 'p*"*" • 
accordance with the written instructions received from the buyer 
within twenty-four hours after the receipt of such instructions — 
Stmdays and holidays excepted. If the purchaser fails to provide 
by the close of the next business day after date of purchase such 
written instructions, then the property involved shall be at his risk 
in all particulars. 

In case the seller shall fail to order the property as hereinbefore Aj.*° cwicel- 
provided, it shall be his duty to promptly notify the purchaser the purchase, 
next day of such neglect, and the purchaser may for such reason 
cancel the purchase; but such cancellation, if made, must be made 
immediately. 

On all property sold as hereinbefore provided, a delivery by the ^®^^^®jy J* 
railroad over which the property arrives, to the designated railroad designated 
shall be construed as a delivery, and the seller's responsibility for ^^ "'"*^* 
damages or loss on any account shall cease, after delivery to such 
connecting line or railroad. 

Whenever grain, mill feed or seeds are sold to be switched or Reaponsibility 
delivered or for shipment beyond Chicago, and after such sale has been faUuie*of*R. R. 
made, it shall develop that the railroad nominated by the buyer is *o accept i:i^ 
tmable to accept or handle the property tendered, it shall be the duty tendersd. 
of the buyer upon receipt of request from the seller, to provide or 
nominate the name of a railroad which will receive such pxoperty; 
and upon failure of the buyer to provide such written instructions 



56/ 



CBvuiXZn.] 



within 48 hours after notice has been given by the seller, the seller 
shall have the right to sell out for account of the purchaser, all property 
so involved; any loss which accrues, shall be paid by the original 
purchaser of the property. 
Time when All property sold as hereinbefore provided for transfer or for 

pi^rty Bold cleaning, clipping or mixing at time of transfer, must be transferred 
Bust be made q^ unloaded within seven business days after delivery to the railroad 
nominated by the buyer, and be weighed under the supervision of 
an official weighmaster. On all property not transferred or unloaded 
within the seven business days, for any reason whatsoever, the pur- 
chaser shall pay eighty (80) per cent of the value of the grain — on 
demand — for the grain so delayed, based on shipper's weights or 
based on the capacity of the car; subject, however, to final adjust- 
ment based on official weights at Chicago, or as may be otherwise 
agreed between buyer and seller. 

Duty of hum I* shall be the duty of the buyer to provide and deliver within 48 

*o.PJ^<*« hours to the railroad or elevator nominated by him for the transfer, 

elevator in oue mixing, clipping, cleaning or shipment of any property bought by 

ele^^f eto. ^^t ^h® necessary instructions for the unloading, cleaning, mixing 

•nd penalty, or handling and shipment of such grain, and upon the failure to 

provide such necessary orders within 48 hours after the delivery of 

the property to the designated railroad or tracks he shall pay, in 

addition to the contract price, one per cent per day as liquidated 

damage for each day's delay, until such necessary instructions have 

been delivered; the purchaser shall also be responsible for any delay 

caused by neglect or errors that may occur through his agents. 

Piovieion ^^^' ^^* ^^ ^ gTSLUi, mill feed or seeds consigned to any member 

forintereet of this Board, or to any firm or corporation duly represented in its 

^'&^ent. membership; or bought by any member thereof, or by any such firm 

andparohaaea qj. corporation, and shipped to Chicago or any common Chicago 

points, subject either to Chicago weights or inspection, or both Chicago 

weights and inspection, the receiver or the purchaser, as the case may 

be, shall charge the current rate of interest on any sum advanced on 

such consignment, or purchase; provided always, that the minimum rate 

of interest so charged shall be at the rate of five (5) per cent per annum. 

Any violation of the provisions of this section shall be subject to 

a penalty of suspension from all the privileges of this Association, or 

of expulsion therefrom, according to the discretion of the Board of 

Directors. 

Sbc. 16. All bills rendered for grain, seeds, millstuffs, straw and 
hay, sold by grade, or by sample, or by grade and sample, either after 
arrival or to arrive, unloaded on regular or private tracks, or in private 
elevators or warehouses, or in any manner as may be agreed upon 
between buyer and seller, if delivered at the office of the buyer by 
2.00 P. M ., shall be paid by 2.46 p. m. the same day , except that on 
Saturdays all bills delivered by 11.20 a. m. shall be paid by 11.50 a. m. 
the same day; provided that the regular team track weight tickets, 
or official Board of Trade weight tickets, or other disinterested cer- 
tificates of weight, shall be attached to the invoice, together with a 
proper receipt for the country bill of_lading and a certificate of inspec- 



[RULB XXII) 



57 



tion. Failure to deliver the freight bill from the originating line shall 
not be construed as a sufficient reason for refusal of payment for such 
property. On all property sold as above described, where the weights 
are not available to the seller, but are in the regular course of business 
first delivered to the buyer, weight tickets with checks covering 
payment shall be delivered on the day next succeeding the date on 
which it is unloaded, by 2.45 p. m. on any regular banking day, or by 
11.50 A. M. on Saturdays. Board of Trade holidays that are not legal 
holidays or are not made holidays by the clearing house banks shall 
not be considered as granting the buyer any time beyond that pro- 
vided in this rule. 

When any member, or any firm of which a member of this Associa- 
tion is a member, or any corporation of which a member is an officer, 
shall violate any of the provisions of this section, such member, or 
such member of such firm, or such officer of such corporation, shall 
be deemed guilty of dishonorable conduct under the provisions of 
Section 9 of Rule IV of the rules of this Association. 

Sec. 17. In making contracts, a specific number of days shall 
be mentioned, and shall mean calendar days, excluding date of sale 
in which to load and ship the grain from the date of the receipt of 
full shipping directions at point of shipment. 

Sec. 18. It shall be the duty of the Board of Directors upon the Qrmin 
nomination of the President to appoint a standing committee of seven Committee 
members of the Association, to be known as the "Grain Committee," 
to serve for one year, or until their successors are appointed. 

Whenever grain is sold subject to the "approval of official sam-Bicbtof 
piers," either as to sample, grade or condition, any party to the transac- 
tion may appeal from the decision of the Official Sampler to the Grain 
Committee, and the decision of the Grain Committee shall be final and 
binding upon all parties interested. 

The delivery of samples of grain in the Excnange Room by non- 
members, through any department Df the Board of Trade, in com- 
petition with members of the Board of Trade, is prohibited. 

No member of the Grain Committee shall sit on any case in which Diointorested 
he is directly or indirectly interested. 

The President of the Board of Trade shall select another member Form ol 
of the Association to serve in the place of any regular member who}^pp2f 
is disqualified or unable to serve. When an appeal to the Grain 
Committee is desired under this rule, such appeal shall be made in 
writing to the Secretary of the Chicago Board of Trade, and the fees, 
as hereinafter provided, shall accompany said appeal. 

The fees shall be $5.00 per car; $10.00 per canal boat, $50.00 perg^^'^gj^" 
vessel. Such fees shall be equally distributed among the members 
serving. In case the Grain Committee shall decide in favor of the I 



58 



(B 



appellant, the appellee shall, within one business day, reimburse the 
appellant with the amount of the appeal fees, as hereinbefore pro- 
vided, and further pay all additional expenses incurred by the Grain 
Committee in securing samples and conducting the case. 

The Grain Committee may decide an appeal either by examina- 
tion of the grain in car, boat or vessel ; or by sample obtained in such 
manner as in their discretion they may deem advisable. 

bidemnity Sbc. 19. Any member, or firm, or corporation, making or receiv- 

ing contracts for indemnity shall confirm the same by memoranda 
through the Clearing House in the same manner and under the same 
regulations and requirements as are provided for contracts of purchase 
and sale in and by the other sections of this rule. 

Sbc. 20. All contracts of indemnity provided for under this rule 
shall be in the following form : 

INDEMNITY OP PURCHASE. 

Chicaoo, Illinois, day of 19 

In consideration of the sum of dollars, receipt of which 

is hereby acknowledged, I hereby agree to indemnify and save harm- 
less from any loss, not exceeding five cents per 

bushel, due to the decline below per bushel of 

bushels of bought by the said for 

r delivery, the said having repre- 
sented that the said indenmity against loss is bought to protect an 
existing and legitimate insurable interest in the commodities forming 
the subject matter of this risk, not otherwise protected by contract 
made under this rule. 

It is further stipulated and agreed between all parties interested 
in this contract of indemnity that — 

1. This contract shall terminate at the close of the business 
session of the Exchange following the date hereof, unless by agreement 
between the parties thereto, a different time of expiration shall be 
specified. 

2. That all claims for indemnity hereunder shall be determined 
by the market price of the commodity involved in this contract of 
indemnity at the close of the business session of the Exchange upon 
the day fixed for the expiration of this contract. 

Signature 



RouXZII.] 



59 



CONFIRMATION OF INDEMNITY OF PURCHASE. 

Chicago, Ilunois, day of 19 

This is certify that has agreed to indemnify and 

save harmless the undersigned from any loss not exceeding five cents 

per bushel due to^the decline below per bushel of 

bushels of bought by the undersigned for 

delivery upon the representation that the undersigned had an existing 

and legitimate insurable interest in the conmiodities forming the 

subject matter of the contract of indemnity, not otherwise protected 

by oontract^made under this rule. 

Signature 

INDEMNITY OF SALE. 
Chicago, Illinois, day of 19. . . . 

In consideration of the sum of dollars, receipt of 

which is hereby acknowledged, I hereby agree to indemnify and save 

harmless from any loss, not exceeding five cents per 

bushel, due to the rise above per bushel of 

bushels of sold by the said for 

delivery, the said having repre- 
sented that the said indemnity against loss is bought to protect an 
ejcisting and legitimate insurable interest in the commodities forming 
the subject matter of this risk, not otherwise protected by contract 
made under this rule. 

It is further stipulated and agreed between all parties interested 
in this contract of indemnity that: 

1. This contract shall terminate at the dose of the business session 
of the Exchange following the date hereof, unless by agreement between 
the parties thereto, a different time of expiration shall be specified. 

2. That all claims for indemnity hereunder shall be determined 
by the market price of the commodity involved in this contract of 
indemnity at the close of the business session of the Exchange upon 
the day fixed for the expiration of this contract. 

Signature 

CONFIRMATION OF INDEMNITY OF SALE. 

Chicago, Illinois day of 19 

This is to certify that has agreed to indemnify 

and save harmless the undersigned from any loss, not exceeding five 

cents per bushel, due to the rise above per bushel 

of bushels of sold by the under- 
signed for delivery upon the representation that the 

undersigned had an existing and legitimate insurable interest in the 



60 



DEtouXXn.} 



oommodities forming the subject matter of the contract of indemnity, 
not otherwise protected by contract made under this rule. 



Signature. 



No member of this Association transacting business in his own 
name, or firm one at least of whose partners is a member of this Asso- 
ciation, or corporation one at least of whose executive officers is a 
member of this Association, shall buy an indemnity for any person 
not a member of this Association, unless such member, firm, or cor- 
poration is already carrying for said person an open contract made in 
accordance with the rules and regulations of this Association for the 
purchase or sale of commodities equal to or greater than the amotmt 
indemnified; provided, however, that it shall be permissible for a 
member of this Association transacting business in his own name, or 
a firm one at least of whose partners is a member of this Association, 
or a corporation one at least of whose executive officers is a member 
of this Association, to buy such indemnity for another such member, 
firm or corporation, upon the signing by the member, firm or corpora- 
tion seeking the indemnity, of a written statement that the said 
member, firm or corporation has open contracts made in accordance 
with the rules and regulations of this Association for the purchase or 
sale of commodities as aforesaid with other members of this Association 
equal to, or greater than, the amount indemnified, and not otherwise 
protected by contract made under this rule. 

Any member who, or whose firm or corporation, shall knowingly 
purchase for himself or another any indemnity as herein provided, 
except in conformity with the directions of the preceding paragraph, 
or who shall employ any device or subterfuge to create artificially an 
apparent insurable interest in order to purchase indemnity thereon, 
or who shall knowingly permit the same to be done by their agents or 
taiployes, shall upon conviction of the first offense before the Board of 
Directors be suspended from all privileges of this Assodaiton for a 
period not to exceed six months, and for any subsequent violation 
thereof, shall be expelled. 
« 

Memoranda of amount due on indemnity contracts and of amounts 
due as premiums on, or considerations for the same, shall be sent 
through the Clearing House the same as is provided for memoranda of 
offsets, and payments of the same shall be made in like manner. 

For negotiating contracts of indemnity, including the adjustment 
of claims thereunder, if any, a commission of not less than ten (10) 
per cent of the consideration of the premium paid or received, shall be 
charged to non-members, and a commission of not less than five (5) 
per cent shall be charged to members. 

How eleftnd. When a broker is employed by a clearing member for the execution 

of orders for contracts of indemnity, a brokerage of not less than three 
(3) per cent of the premium paid or received shall be charged. 



BuLM xxiu.-xxiy.] 



61 



RULE XXIII. 

FAILURB TO DELIVER OR RECEIVE ON CONTRACTS. 

Section 1. In case any property contracted for future delivery 
is not delivered at maturity of contract, the President shall appoint a 
committee of three from the membership at large, to be approved by 
the Board of Directors, which committee shall determine as nearly as 
possible the true commercial value of the commodity in question on 
the day of maturity of the contract, and the price so established shall 
be the basis upon which settlement is made. 

As liquidated damage the seller shall pay to the purchaser not less 
than five per cent, nor more than ten per cent of the value of the 
commodity as established by the committee; the percentage, within 
said limits, to be such as, in the judgment of the committee, may be 
just and equitable. 

Settlement shall be made without delay, and the damage, as deter- 
mined under the provisions of this section, shall be due and payable 
immediately upon the finding of the committee. 

This section shall not be construed as appl3ring to any parties 
having the property both bought and sold, in all of which cases settle- 
ment shall be made on the basis of prices established by the contracts 
in such instances. 

Sec 2. In case any property contracted for future delivery isj^ighuof 
not received and paid for when properly tendered, it shall be the duty J*°?°™io 
of the seller, in order to establish any claim on the purchaser, to sell rtoeive. 
it on the market at any time during the next twenty-four hours, at 
his discretion, after such default shall have been made, notifying the 
purchaser within one hour of such sale; and any loss restilting to the 
seller shall be paid by the party in default. 

RULE XXIV. 

PROVISIONS. 

Section 1. The Board of Directors shall appoint five members 7n« p<M<tinn 
of the Association as a Committee on Provision Inspection, who shall Oommitue. 
have and exercise a general control over the inspection of provisions, 
and shall act as referees in case of complaint against the Chief Inspector 
of Provisions or the inspection of any lot of provisions, or any matter ^owere. 
of difference pertaining to the same, except as hereinafter provided. 
The committee shall be authorized, in determining the correctness of 
any inspection they are called upon to revise, to adopt any measure 
they may deem necessary under the circumstances for the ascertain- 
ment of its true character. The committee shall be entitled to f ees (joJmitte*. 
amounting to three dollars each for each case of reference decided by 
them, to be paid by the party against whom the decision shall be 
made. 

Sec 2. The Board of Directors will also appoint a suitable P^^" SJSLjtor of 
son as Chief Inspector of Provisions, who shall be required to give a Provisions, 
bond in such amount as shall be fixed by the Board of Directors, g^nd 
conditioned for the faithful performance of his duties as prescribed 



62 



{fixjiM XZIV.) 



Deputy 
Inspeeton, 
how 
Appointed. 



Inapeoting. 
Reports. 



of 

PiortoioiM. 



registcatioin. 



Property to 
be marked. 



New reoeipte. 



by the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Trade of the City of 
Chicago and the Regulations of the Board of Directors; which said 
bond shall be made to the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, for 
the use and benefit of any parties having claims under the Rules and 
Regulations of the said Board of Trade for damages against said Chief 
Inspector on account of any of his official acts. Said bond shall be 
satisfactory to and approved by the Board of Directors before the said 
Chief Inspector shall be entitled to enter upon the discharge of his 
official duties. 

Sec. 3. The Chief Inspector of Provisions shall appoint, to be 
confirmed by the Committee on Provision Inspection, a sufficient 
number of competent deputy inspectors, who shall be under his con- 
trol and subject to his orders in all matters pertaining to the perform- 
ance of official duty. 

Sec. 4. The Chief Inspector, through and by his deputies, shall 
furnish the necessary labor and materials for inspection. The several 
deputy inspectors shall make a report in detail of every inspection or 
examination they may make, which report shall be returned to the 
Chief Inspector, and be by him preserved for future reference. 

Sec. 5. The Board of Directors shall also appoint a competent 
person as Registrar of Provisions, whose duty it shall be to provide 
and cause to be kept suitable books, in which shall be registered aU 
warehouse receipts for beef, sheep and hog products issued as "regu- 
lar" or for the "regular delivery" of such property in the Chicago 
market under the Rules of the Board of Trade; such receipts, after 
being so registered, shall be stamped or written across their face with 
the word "Registered" and the date of such registry, and signed, in 
writing, by said Registrar or some person duly authorized by him for 
that service. All warehouse receipts, before being registered, shall be 
plainly numbered, and shall indicate on their face the number or mark 
of the particular lot of property intended to be covered or represented 
by such receipt. All such receipts issued from or by each warehouse 
or other place of storage shall be consecutively numbered, and no 
receipts of duplicate numbers issued from the same place of storage 
shall be registered. All property covered or represented by registered 
warehouse receipts shall be plainly marked in such manner as will 
clearly distinguish it from all other property stored in the same ware- 
house or place of storage, and by such marks, numbers or characters 
as may be approved by the Registrar of Provisions ; such marks to be 
so arranged as to avoid the possibility of duplication or uncertainty as 
to the identity of the property so receipted for. No warehouse receipt 
shall be registered until a report shall have been received at the office 
of the Registrar of Provisions from a duly authorized deputy that the 
property represented by the receipt is actually in the place of storage 
and is marked as indicated in the receipt; such reports shall be in a 
form prescribed by the Registrar, and shall be preserved by him for 
future reference. No second warehouse receipt for the same property 
shall be registered unless the original is presented at the time and its 
registration canceled by the Registrar. In such caise, new receipts, 
either for the whole or parts of lots, or the consolidation of different 



(BuiaXZiyj 



63 



lots, may be registered upon the report of a deputy that the property 
is in the place represented, and is marked as represented. All new 
receipts so registered, except receipts for short rib sides and extra 
short rib sides, shall bear the same date, as near as may be, with the 
originals so canceled, and no receipts differing in date more than thirty 
days shall be consolidated into a new receipt. 

No property shall be removed from the place of storage indicated Property not 
by any registered receipt issued to represent it until the registration ,jntii 
of such receipt has first been canceled in the office of the Registrar of ^'^{Jj**"* ** 
Provisions, by writing or stamping across its face the words, "Regis- 
tration Canceled." 

Sec. 6. The Chief Inspector shall receive for his services and for Compeasation 
the compensation of the deputy inspectors employed by him, the fees inspector, 
for inspection as established by the Board of Trade. The Registrar 
shall receive, as compensation for his own services and the necessary co^jpenaation 
expenses of his office, such sum, to be paid from the funds of the of Registrar. 
Association, as may be determined by the Board of Directors. 

Sec. 7. All claims for errors of inspection, or damages resulting Claimajor 
from improper inspection, shall be made to the Chief Inspector, and 
in case of dispute as to the validity of any claim so made, the question 
shall be decided by the Committee on Provision Inspection, or by a How decided, 
special arbitration, if either of the parties so prefer. In the latter 
case the arbitrators shall be chosen either by mutual agreement, or 
an equal number, not exceeding two, may be selected, each by the 
Chief Inspector and the claimant; and the persons so chosen shall 
select an additional arbitrator. Arbitration, either by the Committee 
on Provision Inspection or special arbitrators, shall be conducted 
under substantially the same form of proceedings as regular arbitra- 
tions under the Rules of the Board of Trade, and shall be subject to 
all the provisions of regular arbitrations, except that they shall not be 
subject to appeal. 

Sec. 8. AH deliveries of beef, sheep or hog products in store, in Regular 
the absence of special agreement, shall be by the delivery of regis- 
tered warehouse receipts, issued from such warehouses or places only 
as shall have been declared regular warehouses for the storage of such 2^^*^*^ **' 
property, by the Board of Directors, under the Rules of the Board of 
Trade; such places of storage, in all cases, to be under cover, and such 
as are suitable for the proper preservation of the property. All such 
deliveries shall be accompanied by a certificate of inspection of the Certifiatte of 
Chief Inspector of Provisions, which certificate shall state the number "^^ **"'' 
of packages or the number of pieces, together with their weight, in the 
lot to which it applies, the place where the same is stored, and the 
distinguishing marks upon it; also the number of packages or pieces 
examined, and that the same was found to be in good merchantable 
condition and of Standard quality. In the case of barreled pork, the 
number of pieces and the weight in each barrel shall be stated, like- 
wise the date when packed; and in the case of lard, the date of its 
packing, as indicated by the packer's brand upon the packages. Such 
certificate shall be dated within thirty (30) days of such delivery; the Date of 
required number of days shall include both the day of date and the certificate 
day of delivery. 



64 



CRuLM XXIV.-ZXV.] 



WarebouM 
bond. 



Provisiona to 
be Standard 
unleai 
otherwiae 
agreed. 



Proviaiona 
packed at 
otber pouita. 



R«ipilar Sec. 9. No warehouse receipts for beef, sheep or hog product 

shall be registered except such as have been issued by or from a ware- 
house or place of storage declared to be a regxilar warehouse for the 
storage of such property by the Board of Directors of the Board of 
Trade; and before any warehouse or storage place shall be declared 
a regular warehouse for the storage of such property, the proprietors 
or managers thereof shall file a bond with sufficient sureties in such 
sum and subject to such conditions as may be deemed necessary by 
the Board of Directors under the Rules and Regulations of the Board 
of Trade and the Regulations and Requirements of the Board of 
Directors in reference to such warehouse. 

RULE XXV. 

SALE OP PROVISIONS. 

Section 1. All provisions sold in this market, in the absence of 
special agreement, shall be standard, and the property delivered must 
comply with the provisions of the Rules of the Board of Trade of the 
City of Chicago applicable thereto, and with the regulations for the 
inspection of provisions, and, in case of hog products, with the require- 
ments as to the cutting and packing of hog products established by 
the Board of Directors. And all provisions sent to this market for 
sale which, upon examination, shall be found to have been manufac- 
tured, handled and packed in all respects in conformity with the 
Rules of the Board of Trade and the said Regulations and Require- 
ments, shall be classed as Standard. 

Sec. 2. All provisions sold as Standard shall be cut, selected and 
packed, in all respects as to quality and condition, conformably to 
the classification of inspection as adopted by the Association; and 
unless otherwise stipulated on all sales made of any of the grades of 
provisions of Standard, the seller shall deliver the parcels of the kind 
and quality called for by such sale, which any duly appointed inspec- 
tor of the Association has examined, and has certified to have been 
packed according to the classification, and is at the time of delivery 
in good merchantable condition in every respect; or, failing to so 
deliver, he shall be bound to settle his contract under the provisions 
of Rule XXIII of the Association; provided^ that in all sales specified 
as for cash, the buyer shall not be bound to pay inspection fees unless 
he orders the inspection of the property. 

Sec. 3. All hog products may be packed in tierces either wood or 
iron bound, or bound partly with both; but in the case of lard each 
260 tierces delivered must be entirely either iron or wood bound. 
Provisions from which any gain has been removed shall not afterwards 
be classed as Standard. 

To take effect on and after October 1, 1907. 
RequiremoDta Sec. 4. All hog products to be classed as Standard shall comply 

to h?r?nmifS *^ ^^ respects with the requirements of the rules of inspection adopted 
by the Board of Trade, and if delivered on or after January 1st shall 
include only such as have been packed on and after the first day of 
the previous October, provided that barreled pork must be kept in 
cold storage, and that mess pork made during the months of Decem- 



Reauifemcnta 
for Standardi 



Settlementa. 

InapectioQ of 
eaao property. 

How packed. 



aa Standard, 
with special 
reference to 
time when 
packed. 



[RouiXXV.I 



65 



ber, January and February must have been packed at least ten days 
before delivery; and that mess pork, delivered during the months 
from March to November, both inclusive, must have been packed at 
least thirty days before being delivered. 

Sec. 5. No original weight shall be taken out of any package of Original 
provisions which is afterward to be offered for sale by the package, ^•**°^" 
without removing the original packer's brand entirely from the head 
of the package, unless the property be repacked and so branded by the 
party repacking. 

Sec. 6. Buyers of provisions on contract, deliverable on the JJj2Jj[5___ 
demand of the buyer, within a specified time, shall have the right to delivtriea. 
inspect the same before the day of delivery, provided they send an 
inspector in time to allow the inspection to be completed before the 
proposed delivery; but failing to do so, the seller shall have the privi- 
lege of having the property inspected, the cost to be paid by the buyer 

Sec. 7. On sales of provisions deliverable at the pleasure of the SSSSS"** ** 
seller within a specified time, the seller shall have the privilege of pl«<»»ur«. 
delivering, at any time during the life of the contract, without pre- 
vious notice to the purchaser, by the tender of a registered regular 
warehouse receipt, together with a certificate of inspection, by an 
inspector of the Association (such inspection having been made within 
the last thirty (30) days) ; such a delivery shall be held to be regular, 
and the buyer shall receive and pay for the same, together with the 
fees for inspection. If, however, within the next forty-eight (48) 
hours the buyer shall report in writing to the Secretary of this Asso- 
ciation that such property is not merchantable, or does not conform Impro^r 
in all respects to the rules of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago how oorreoted 
in relation to provisions and to the requirements for the cutting and 
packing of hog products, it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the 
Board to immediately notify in writing the Committee on Provision 
Inspection of such report, and if within the next five business days 
immediately following the date of the delivery of warehouse receipt, 
the seller is officially notified that the property in question is not 
standard, the seller shall immediately receive the property from the 
buyer, substituting therefor other property of the same kind that is 
standard. On sales deliverable upon the demand of the buyer, if the 
buyer makes demand for the property thus sold before the expiration 
of the contract, the seller may have, in the case of pickled meats, one 
business day, and in the case of boxed meats, four business days in 
which to prepare the property for delivery. 

To take effect on and after January 1, A. D. 1900. 

Sec. 8. On sales of pickled meats, or lard, if more than one brand Two or more 
is tendered, the purchaser shall be required to pay such inspection f,**** 
fees only as would be proper were the property all of one brand. Pro- 
vided, that in deliveries of various brands to complete a lot of 250 
packages, not more than five (5) different brands shall be tendered. 
Bach rogular delivery ihall be from one warehouse. 



66 



PUnaZXY.! 



In «•• Sec. 9. On sales of provisions as Standard, or of a particular 

does not pass packer's brand, in case the property does not pass inspection, the 

holTadiustad ^^V^ shall elect either to take the lot named at contract price, after 

being regidarly inspected at cost of seller, or to require that some 

standard lot be substituted, but the buyer shall receive the one or 

the other, if tendered within a reasonable time. 



Deliveiies 
inferior to 
Munple. 



Examination 
and care of 
property. 



Cured meate — 
deliveries. 

Dry salted 
meats. 



Frosen joints. 



Balk meats — 
saltage. 



Drainage. 
Tare of lard. 



Weight of 
lard in tieroes. 



Settlements. 



Deliveries by 
oar or team. 



Sec. 10. In sales of provisions when an article is substituted or 
delivered inferior in quality to the sample exhibited, or which has 
been passed upon by the inspector as standard, the seller shall be 
responsible for any damage resulting from such exchange or substitu- 
tion. All examinations or inspections are to be made within a reason- 
able time, and proper care of the property is to be taken by the owner 
or his agent. 

Sec. 11. In sales of fully cured meats, or to be fully cured and 
delivered at any specified time, the seller must deliver in good faith, 
according to contract. Where sales of dry salted meats are made 
without other specifications, it shall be considered that the sale con- 
templates meats fully cured. Also when sales of sweet pickled meats 
are made for delivery within a specified time, without other specifica- 
tions, it shall be considered that the sale of such sweet pickled meats 
contemplates meats fully cured. 

Sec. 12. Joints cut from hogs that have been frozen shall not be 
classed as standard. 

Sec. 13. In case of no specific agreement, the saltage allowed on 
bulk meats shall be one per cent; but should the buyer or seller object, 
the Inspector shall sweep as many drafts as he may consider necessary, 
and the percentage so determined shall be binding on both parties. 
One per cent of drainage shall be allowed on pickled meats. 

Sec. 14. To determine the tare of lard, the package shall first be 
weighed gross, the lard then removed, and the empty package sub- 
jected to dry heat and drained, the empty package to be then weighed 
and its weight deducted from the gross weight. The difference so 
obtained shall be considered the net weight of the lard. 

Sec. 15. In case lard in tierces be delivered of a weight more or 
less than 340 lbs. net per tierce, the shortage or excess shall be settled 
for at the current market price, which for deliveries before 11 o'clock, 
shall be considered as the posted price of the previous day, but the 
full number of packages contracted for shall be delivered. In the 
settlement of contracts for lard, 340 lbs. net shall be taken as the 
average weight of a tierce. 

Lots of 250 tierces weighing less than 85,000 pounds net will not 
be regular for delivery except by deducting 1 cent per pound on the 
amount of the deficiency, and lots of 250 tierces weighing over 90,000 
pounds net will not be regular for delivery except by deducting 1 cent 
per pound on the excess over 90,000 pounds. 

To take effect on and after January 1, A. D. 1907. 

Sec. 16. All provisions sold for shipment must, upon request of 
the purchaser be delivered on cars or on teams free of charge, and 



|BinaZXV.l 



67 



whenever the seller notifies the buyer of his readiness to deliver, it 
shall be the duty of the buyer to provide means of shipment within 
three (3) business days. Failing to do so, the shipper shall have the 
right to demand of the buyer payment in settlement of his sale. 

All deliveries of provisions by warehouse receipts shall be free ofFtmwtoxB^e. 
storage to the buyer for five (5) business days, and any expenses 
attending the examination or loading of provisions represented by 
warehouse receipts shall be paid to the warehouseman by the party 
ordering the same; provided, in no case the expense of loading on 
teams be in excess of what the charge would be if loaded on cars. 

To take effect on and after January 1, A. D. 1900. 

Sec. 17. The standard net weight of meats packed in boxes shall 
be between 475 and 525 pounds for each box, and in all settlements weight of 
or deliveries of boxed meats an average of 500 pounds net per boxg****"* 
shall be made the basis for settlement, and the excess or shortage 
from said average shall be settled at the market value of the property 
delivered at the time of its delivery. But in case of delivery the full 
number of packages contracted for must be delivered. 

Sec. 18. Long clear sides shall not average less than forty-five 
(45) pounds; short clear sides shall not average less than thirty-five^®*******' 
(35) pounds; and extra clear sides shall not average less than thirty 
(30) pounds nor more than sixty (60) pounds, to be a regular delivery 
on contracts. But no side in any lot shall vary in weight more than 
25 per cent from the average weight of the lot. 

Short ribs for regular delivery must comply with the following 
conditions and requirements: 

Short ribs with the back-bone out, averaging not less than 30 
pounds nor more than 60 pounds, at contract price, over 60 pounds 
and not over 70 pounds average shall be deliverable by deducting 20 
cents per 100 pounds; over 70 pounds and not over 80 pounds aver- 
age by deducting 30 cents per 100 pounds. Short ribs with the back- 
bone split down the center, averaging not less than 30 pounds nor 
more than 50 pounds, shall be deliverable at a discount of 2 per cent; 
but no side in any lot shall vary in weight more than 10 pounds from 
the average weight of the lot. 

All dry salted meats, deliverable on contracts, shall be weighed 
in 25,000 pound lots, and the Inspector's certificate shall specify that 
they were so weighed; any two (2) lots of 25,000 pounds each may be 
of different averages, but must be of the same kind of ribs and in the Shoulden. 
same warehouse. Such shaU constitute a regidar delivery on sales of 
50,000 pounds. n 

To take effect on and after January 1, A. D. 1907. 

Sec. 19. Upon examination of dry salted meats, either in bulk 
or for boxing, by an official Inspector, if over 10 per cent is rejected Limit on 
the Inspector shall not be required to issue a certificate of inspection JJ'bJroguJilr! 
for the same. 

To take effect on and after January 1, A. D. 1900. 



68 



tBuuw XXV.-XXVL -lULViL l 



Sec. 20. On each reinspection of dry salted short ribs or dry 
salted extra short clear sides, for a regular delivery, the warehouse 
receipt covering the same shall be canceled and the property delivered 
on a new warehouse receipt. 



PaekajEM to 
be stripped. 



Stripping 



Time allowed 
for report. 



Repeal. 
Pending 
oomplamte 
and defaults. 



RULE XXVI. 



TARES. 



Section 1. In the sale of property in packages, involving the 
question of tare, the actual weight of packages (to be ascertained by 
stripping, at the time of delivery) shall be deducted from the gross 
weight. In case the purchaser shall require the weighing and strip- 
ping of lard, or the weighing of any property delivered on contract, 
he shall so notify the parties delivering the same within five (5) busi- 
ness days from date of delivery, including the day of delivery, or the 
purchaser shall have no right of reclamation on the seller. Such 
weighing and stripping shall be done by the Official Weigher of Pro- 
visions of the Association, and the result reported within fifteen (15) 
days. 

RULE XXVII. 

Section 1. All former Rules and By-Laws of the Association are 
hereby repealed; provided, pending complaints and complaints based 
on transactions or defaults which have occurred prior to the adoption 
hereof shall be governed by the rules heretofore in force. 



BY-LAWS. 



ARTICLE I. 

At all general or stated meetings of the Association or Board o^P**Jfi°f**l# 
Directors, the following shall be the order of business : piooMdinsk 

Call to order. 

Reading minutes of previous meeting (which may be dispensed 
with). 

Hearing reports. 

General business. 

Adjournment. 

ARTICLE II. 

At all special meetings of the Association or Board of Directors, Buainew of 
only such special business shall be considered as was expressly em- meetinci. 
braced in the call for such meeting, except by unanimous consent. 

ARTICLE III. 

When any member requires it, the mover of a proposition shall On debates, 
put the same in writing. No debate shall be permitted except on a 
motion regularly made and seconded. A member, however, shall not 
be prevented" from prefacing with explanatory remarks any proposi- 
tion he may be about to make. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Every member who speaks shall rise and address the President, Limitations 
and no person shall speak more than twice on the same subject, ^^^^ debata. 
except by way of explanation, if objection is made thereto, unless 
permitted to proceed by a majority of those present. 

ARTICLE V. 

The presiding officer shall be judge of all questions of order and Quertioa of 
proceedings, and when the Rules of the Association or of parlia- **'***'• 
mentary order are infringed upon, he may call any member to order. 
A member may appeal to the Association on any question of parlia- Appeab. 
mentary proceeding not provided for by the Rules or By-Laws of the 
Association, or by a special order, and, if seconded on such appeal, a 
majority of the members present shall decide the question at issue. 

60 



70 



[Asncus yi.-yii.-vni.-DL-Xi] 



Intarraptloiia 
and priTi' 
l«cea qu«ii- 



Division of 
the question. 
What moticms 
not debatable. 



Reoonsidera- 
tion. when in 
order. 



ARTICLE VI. 

No business before any meeting of the Association shall be inter- 
rupted, except by motion for the previous question, to lay upon the 
table, to postpone, or to adjourn, and such motion shall preclude 
amendment or decision of the original subject until such motion shall 
be disposed of. 

ARTICLE VII. 

A member may call for the division of a question when the sense 
will admit of it. A motion to lay upon the table, or to indefinitely 
postpone, shall not be debatable, and a proposition, once disposed of, 
shall not be revived at the same meeting, except by a vote to recon- 
sider; and a motion to reconsider shall not be entertained, except at 
the same or the next meeting after the former action, and then only 
when made by a member absent or voting with the majority. 



Votes on 
'Chu«e. 
Reference to 
a special 
meeting. 



ARTICLE VIII. 

No vote shall be taken on 'Change, except when notice has been 
given at least one day, or by unanimous consent. Upon demand of 
one-third of the members present, any question, so submitted, shall 
be referred to a meeting of the Association at some other time than 
the usual hours of 'Change. 



Application 
of Rules of 
Order. 



ARTICLE IX. 

All questions of order, or proceedings provided for by the Rules 
and By-Laws shall be held to govern both the Association and the 
Board of Directors, so far as they may be applicable. 



New Rules 
and By-Laws 
and Amend- 
ments, how 
adopted. 

Propositions 
to amend, 
how sub- 
mitted. 



ARTICLE X. 

None of the General Rules or By-Laws of the Association shall be 
rescinded or altered, nor shall any new Rules or By-Laws be adopted 
except by an affirmative ballot vote of a majority of the members 
voting on the proposition, and on which ballot there shall be at least 
three hundred (300) votes cast. No proposition to amend the Gen- 
eral Rules or By-Laws shall be entertained or submitted to a vote, 
unless it shall have been recommended by a vote of the Board of 
Directors at a regtilar meeting of the said Board, or has been approved 
by the Board of Directors on the recommendation in writing of at 
least twenty-five members of the Association. In case a proposition 
for such amendment is submitted to the Board of Directors by at 
least twenty-five members, it shall be considered by them, and reported 
on to the Association within fifteen days from the first regular meet- 
ing of said Board after it shall have been so presented; and in case it 
be not approved by the Board of Directors, they shall, in reporting it 
to the Association, give their reason for such disapproval, and the said 
proposition may then be brought before the Association for a ballot, 
as herein provided, on a new submission in writing, over the signa- 
tures of at least one hundred members. Any proposition to amend 



(AsnoLB X.) 



71 



the Rules or By-Laws shall, before being acted upon by the Associa- Propogggg 
tion, be conspicuously posted in the Exchange room for at least ten 
days immediately preceding, and it may be amended in any way that 
is germane to its general scope, at a regular or special meeting of the 
Association (not during the regular business hours on 'Change); 
provided, that such amendment, in specific form, is submitted over 
the signatures of twenty-five members and posted in the Exchange 
room for at least three days prior to the time of holding such special 
meeting. Should such amendment be adopted at such special meet- 
ing, the original amendment proposed as thus amended shall then be 
posted in the Exchange room at least three days before the proposi- 
tion as amended is submitted to a ballot vote of the Association. 

The provisions of Section 6 of Rule IV, in respect to the opening 0oiiiig of 
of the Exchange room on business days, may be suspended, as to any 
particular day, by the Board of Directors by a two-thirds vote of the 
members present. 



REGULATIONS 



OF THE 



BOARD OF TRADE 



Governing the Inspection of Flour 



C Adopted by the Board of Directors 



8h»U 
ofi^ve. 



REGULATION I. 



INSPBGTION COMMITTBB. 



The Board of Directors shall appoint a Standing Committee on 
Flour Inspection, to consist of five members, who shall be dealers in 
flour. This committee shall have and exercise a general control of 
the inspection of flour. 



Sound. 



REGULATION II. 



FLOUR TO INSPECT AS SOUND. 



Flour classed as sound shall be strictly sound, free from any and 
every defect or fault causing either smell or taste. 



REGULATION III. 



PLOUR TO INSPECT AS UNSOUND. 



Unaound. All flour not strictly sound, whether the unsoundness be derived 

from the condition of the grain from which it was manufactured, or 
has originated in the flour, shall be classed as unsound or slightly 
unsound, as its condition may be. 



Only sound 
and full 
weight to be 
branded. 
Biand. 



REGULATION IV. 



BRANDING. 



The Inspector shall brand all flour, inspected by him in barreisp 
that is sound and full weight; stencils shall be used for branding, 
which shall read as follows: "Official Inspection, Board of Trade, 
Chicago," also giving month and year of inspection. 



Certifisates. 

ImsaUr 
Fknir. 



REGULATION V. 



CERTIFICATE OF INSPECTION. 



Certificate of inspection shall be issued by the Inspector in strict 
accordance with the inspection of every lot examined by him. No 
separate certificate shall be issued by the Inspector for two or more 



72 



pUMfOLATIOm V.-VI.-VII.] 



73 



parts of any one lot of flour inspected by him, a part of which is sound 
and a part unsound, or when it inspects two or more grades. Y/hen 
flour is inspected by sample, the certificate shall mention its con- 
dition, as well as its relation to the sample. When flour is unsound Ungoimd 
the Inspector shall state in the certificate the character of the unsound- ^J^^^[^ ^ 
ness, as musty, hard sour, soft sour, unsound, or slightly unsound, and the b« itatod. 
number of packages of each description, and also, when practicable, the 
number of packages that may be so stained or out of condition as to de- 
preciate the market value of the flour. In case the flour has been over- DMMgd 
hauled and cleaned on account of having been wet. and the Inspector '^^^ "" 
shall deem such overhauling in any way damaging to the market 
value of the flour, he shall note in his certificate "wet and cleaned." 
Flour in round-hoop barrels and jute sacks shall, in absence of any Round hoopi 
special agreement, be considered as regular in deliveries. If flour is y«^fcj ^ 
in flat-hooped barrels, or cotton sacks, the Inspector shall so note in ^^ hooM. 
his certificate, also on sample furnished to the party ordering the 
inspection. 

REGULATION VI. 

RE-INSPECTION. 

There shall be no charge for a single inspection on flour belonging R«taispeotiao 
to the same owner for whom the first inspection was made; but on ff, ,Sn!^ [P* 
more than one inspection of the same flour, and on flour which has 
changed ownership after the first inspection, the Inspector shall be 
entitled to his regular fee. 



REGULATION VII. 

WEIGHTS. 

A barrel of flour shall be deemed to weigh 196 pounds, net; jute and Weight of a 
cotton sacks, for export, 140 pounds, gross; jute and cotton sacks, for ^'^'* 

domestic consumption, 141 pounds, gross; half -barrel jute and cotton J^«iK?** <>' ^^ 
sacks, 98 pounds, gross; quarter-barrel cotton sacks, 49 pounds, gross; 
eighth-barrel cotton sacks, 24 J^ pounds, gross, and no allowance shall 
be made for any overweight. In case of short weights on flour in Short weishts ] 
barrels, the buyer shall be allowed for the shortage at the rate he pays, 
and, in addition, 5 cents per barrel for the expense of refilling. The 
Inspector shall satisfy himself in regard to weights, and in case he 
deems it necessary to strip some of the flour, he shall strip five barrels 
from each lot, and shall be entitled to 15 cents for each barrel soFewfor 
stripped ; if it proves to be short in weight, the charge for stripping to ■^"PP"*** 
be paid by the seller. All packages of flour which may be found 
largely deficient in weight, from bad order or any other cause, shall 
not enter into the average, but their weight shall be separately ascer- 
tained and certified to by the Inspector. When flour is sold in sacks, 
the gross weight shall be considered the actual weight. In case of 
short weight, the buyer shall be entitled to 1 cent per pound for 
freight. When flour in sacks is short in weight more than 2 per cent 
it shall not be considered regular. 



'4 [RMOXJinam yiII.-IX.-X.-XI.) 

REGULATION VIII. 

inspector's ^bbs. 

Few for The fee for inspecting and branding flour within the City of Chicago 

liwp«a*acB shall be at the rate of 2 cents per barrel, whether the flour be in barrels 
or sacks, the buyer to pay one-half of the same. And unless the flour 
in sacks is sewed and loaded in accordance with the recommendations 
of the Committee on Flour Inspection, the inspector will be entitled 
to charge for the labor necessary to put the flour in proper condition 
for inspection, a sum not to exceed $2 per car. 

REGULATION IX. 

REPORT OP STOCKS AND INSPECTIONS. 

Stookstob* It shall be the further duty of the Inspector to ascertain the 

monthly. Stock of flour in Chicago on the flrst day of each month, and to report 

the same to the Secretary of the Association, to be by him posted 

upon the bulletin of the Exchange Room. In taking the account of 

stock there shall be included only the amount in the several freight 

depots, the public warehouses, and the places of storage by receivers, 

Inspeetiona to and in the city mills. The Inspector shall also furnish to the Secretary 

^^ ' of the Association, monthly, a statement of the number of barrels and 

the number of sacks of flour inspected by him during the preceding 

month. 

REGULATION X. 

SAMPLES PURNISHED AND RETAINED BY INSPECTOR. 

Iziap«otorto It shall be the further duty of the Inspector to furnish in the 

^ kplM. Exchange Room, each day before 12 o'clock noon, to the parties for 



whom the flour is inspected, the Inspector's sample or samples (if 
more than one grade in each lot) of each car or lot of flour that is 
inspected by him, said sample or samples bearing his official stamp 
SuupleB to b« upon the face of the bag. He shall also retain duplicate samples of 
****" ' all flour inspected by him for sixty days from the time of inspection; 

and, on the request of either buyer or seller, shall preserve the sample 
for a period not to exceed four months. 

REGULATION XI. 

APPEALS. 

▲pp«ak In case either the buyer or seller is dissatisfied with the inspection 

of flour, he shall have the privilege of taking an appeal to the Com- 
mittee on Flour Inspection, upon paying the fee of five dollars for 
every appealed case; this fee to be paid to the Secretary of the Board 
by the party making the appeal, at the time the appeal is made; such 
fees to be paid by the Secretary to the committee, in case the Inspector 
is sustained, but in case the Inspector is not sustained, the fee shall 

How^^^ be refunded to the applicant for the appeal. The samples, without 
name or date, shall be furnished by the Inspector, who shall state the 
cause of appeal. Neither buyer nor seller shall be represented before 
the committee, and the decision of a majority of the committee shall 
be final. 



(RjMnukTioffB Xn.-XIII.] 7 PC 

[RBCoiaaDf DATioar I.) ' ^ 

REGULATION XII. 

CARTAGE OF FLOUR. 

In the absence of special agreement to the contrary, it is established Cartas^ in 
as a regidation of trade that in sales of flour any cartage for moving gpj^*]® ° 
the property from where it is at the time of sale shall be paid by the^grownent. 
buyer. 

REGULATION XIII. 

REPEAL OR AMENDMENT OF REGULATIONS. 

No change shall be made in these regulations or recommendations Repeal or 
by the Board of Directors before submitting the same to a meeting, *™*'* ™®° ' 
properly called, of the members of the Board of Trade that are inter- 
ested in the flour trade, in which ten shall constitute a quorum. 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 



The Committee on Flour Inspection recommend to millers and Flour in 
shippers of ilour the following requirements of standard sacks: requir«meiila. 

NO. 140 — JUTE EXPORT SACKS 

Shall be from the best material, double stitched, not using less than 
an equivalent to 40x49 inch mangled or craped finished material, 
weighing not less than 12 ounces per yard of 40 inches in width, or 
15 ounces for the complete bag. If from starched or sized material, 
the complete bag should not weigh less than 16 ounces. 

NO. 280 JUTE EXPORT SACKS 

Shall be from the best material, double stitched, not using less than 
an equivalent to 50x63 inch mangled or craped finished material, 
weighing not less than 15 ounces per yard of 50 inches in width, or 
25 ounces for the complete bag. If from starched or sized material, 
the complete bag should not weigh less than 26^ ounces. 

Seamless jute sacks must be from same weight and quality of 
material, etc., but require 4 per cent less material, and may weigh 
4 per cent less. 

140 POUND COTTON EXPORT SACKS 

Shall be double stitched, best Twill Drill, Osnaburg or Duck, free 
from starch or sizing, using of Twill or Drill not less than an equiva- 
lent to 40x47 inches, or, if Osnaburg or Duck, not less than 37^x51 ^ 
inch material, the complete bag weighing not less than 91 ounces. 



II. 

The Conunittee on Flour Inspection also recommend to millers 
and shippen of flour m sacks to be inspected in this market, that in 
dosing the sack the month edge of the sack be tuned in without 
rolling, and sewed with a single seam, the stitches to be at least U 
inches apart. (See Pig. 1.) This will allow the Inspector to insert 
the trier between the stitches without making holes in Che doth. 



The Committee on Flour Inspection further recommend to millers, 
shippers of flour, and railway agents, that in loading cars the follow- 
ing instructions be observed: 

[(One hundred and forty pound sacks should be piled in two tiers 
lengthwise of the car, the mouths of sacks placed toward center of 
car (see Fig. 2), leaving the spaed between the tiers of sacks in the 
center of the car free and clear for the convenience of the Inspector. 

The sacks of flour should be piled as fallows: The sacks on the 
floor to be placed four inches from the side walls of car, and sacks so 
piled as to gradually indine to the walls of the car until the top rows 
press strongly f^ainst the said walls, as shown in Fig. 2. 



77 



Unless these recommendations be complied with the Inspector 
wiH charge for the labor necessary to put the Sour in proper poiition 
for inspection. 



RULES 

Governing the Inspection of Grain 

IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS . 

In Forcb on and After November 19, 1909. 

The following are the niles adopted by the Board of Railroad and 
Warehouse Commissioners, establishing a proper number and standard 
of grades for the Inspection of Grain, as revised by them; the same to 
take effect on and after the 19th day of November, 1909, in lieu of 
all rules on the same subject heretofore existing. 

Orville F. Berry, Chairman, Carthage, 111. 
Bernard A. Eckhart, Chicago, 111. 
Jambs A. Willoughby, Belleville, 111. 

Commissioners. 

EXTRACTS FROM THE RULES 



Prescribed by the Board of Railroad and Warehouse Com- 
missioners FOR the Administration op the Department 
of Grain Inspection and Warehouse Registration 
IN THE State of Illinois, and in Force from 
AND after November 19, 1909. 



attempts at fraud or interference 

All persons employed in the inspection of grain shall promptly 
report to the Chief Inspector in writing all attempts to defraud the 
system of grain inspection established by law, and all instances where 
warehousemen shall deliver or attempt to deliver grain of a lower 
grade than that called for by the warehouse receipt. 

They shall also, in the same manner, report all attempts of receivers 
or shippers of grain, or any other person interested therein, to instruct 
or in any improper way to influence the action or opinion of any In- 
spector in the discharge of his duty; and the Chief Inspector shall 
report all such cases to the Commission. 

RULES 

All grain in store in any warehouse of Class "A" at the time any 
amendment to the established rules of inspection (affecting such 
grain) may hereafter go into effect shall be inspected out (in satisfac- 
tion of warehouse receipts dated prior to that time only) in accordance 
with the rules as they stood prior to such amendment. 

78 



(RoiM i.-n.-ni.-iT.-v.i 



79 



No claim for damages on account of error in the inspection of any 
lot of grain (except grain inspected from PubUc Warehouses in accord- 
ance with law) will be entertained or allowed by the Board of Rail- 
road and Warehouse Commissioners, unless complaint of such inspec- 
tion shall be made to the Chief Inspector before the grain in question 
shall be removed from the car in which it is inspected, or before it 
shall leave the jurisdiction of the department. 

Grain transferred from the car in which it was inspected to another 
must be inspected after transfer to entitle the owner to have any 
claim arising thereunder considered by the Board of Railroad and 
Warehouse Commissioners. 



RULE 1. 

Failure to report for duty unless properly excused will be deemed 
a surrender of the position held by the absentee and no compensation 
will be allowed for days so absent. 

RULE 2. 

Deputy Inspectors, Chief Samplers and Helpers are especially 
instructed to use all due care in cases where it becomes necessary to 
remove boards to obtain ingress into cars in order to properly inspect 
or sample the grain in such cars, to replace all such boards removed 
in such a manner as to prevent leakage or waste of grain from cars. 
It will be the duty of all inspectors and Chief Samplers to make a 
record of defective and leaky condition of cars and grain doors and to 
report the same to the Chief Grain Inspector on blanks especially 
prepared, showing the location of leakage and such other information 
as would be of service to the receiver and the shipper of grain. 

RULE 3. 

EARLIBR HOURS. 

When the receipts are large, and the interests of the trade require 

an earlier inspection, all Deputy Inspectors, Chief Samplers and 

Helpers assigned to duty on the track will begin work at as early an 

hour as practicable. 

RULE 4. 

EVBNING WORK. 

Inspectors stationed at elevators wiU, when necessary to complete 
the cargo or shipment upon which they may be engaged, remain on 
duty after regular hours and as late in the evening as they can see 
to inspect grain safely. Compensation for such services is provided 
in Rules 13 and 14 of the Railroad and Warehouse Commission. 

RULE 5. 

WET WEATHER AMD DARKNESS. 

No inspector stationed at an elevator is authorized to inspect out 
of store after dark or in wet weather, except on receipt, personally 
or through the office of the Chief Inspector, of an order written upon 
the printed blanks furnished by the Department, filled and signed by 
the owner of the grain or his authorized agent, relieving such Inspector 
of all responsibility for damage which may be caused by such wet 



80 



(RuuL] 



weather, or loss by such errors as are liable to occur by reason of 
darkness; but in every case the Inspector must be personally present 
when the grain is actually delivered on board, making his report of 
the inspection after such actual delivery. 



NOTICE. 

All matters pertaining to the inspection of grain should be taken 
up with the Chief Inspector of Grain. 

In case of unsatisfactory inspection^ write or wire immediately. 
Grain cannot be re-inspected after it has been unloaded and the 
identity of it lost. W. Scott Cowbn, 

Chief Inspector of Grain. 

RULE No. 1— WINTER WHEAT. 

No. 1 Whitb Winter Wheat. — Shall include all varieties of pure 
soft white winter wheat, sound, plump, dry, sweet and clean, and 
weigh not less than 58 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 White Winter Wheat — Shall include all varieties of soft 
white winter wheat, dry, sound and clean, and shall not contain 
more than 8 per cent of soft red winter wheat, and weigh not less than 
67 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 White Winter Wheat — Shall include all varieties of soft 
white winter wheat. It may contain 5 per cent of damaged grains 
other than skin-burnt wheat, and may contain 10 per cent of soft 
red winter wheat, and weigh not less than 53 lbs. to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 4 White Winter Wheat — Shall include all varieties of soft 
white winter wheat not fit for a higher grade in consequence of being 
poor quality, damp, musty or dirty, and shall not contain more than 
10 per cent of soft red winter wheat, and weigh not less than 50 lbs. 
to the measured bushel. 

No. 1 Red Winter Wheat — Shall be pure soft red winter wheat 
of either or both light and dark colors, sound, sweet, plump and well 
cleaned, and weigh not less than 60 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Red Winter Wheat — Shall be soft red winter wheat of 
either or both light and dark colors, sound, sweet and dean, shall not 
contain more than 5 per cent of white winter wheat, and weigh not 
less than 58 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Red Winter Wheat — Shall be sound, soft red winter wheat 
of either or both light and dark colors, not clean or plump enough for 
No. 2, shall not contain more than 8 per cent of white winter wheat, 
and weigh not less than 55 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Red Winter Wheat — Shall be soft red winter wheat of 
either or both light and dark colors, shall contain not more than 8 
per cent of white winter wheat. It may be damp, musty or dirty, 
but must be cool, and weigh not less than 50 lbs. to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 1 Hard Winter Wheat — Shall include all varieties of pure 
hard winter wheat, sound, plump, dry, sweet and weU cleaned, and 
weigh not less than 61 lbs. to the measured bushel. 



IBoiM i.-n.i 



81 



No. 2 Hard Winter Whbat — Shall include all varieties of hard 
winter wheat of either or both light and dark colors, dry, sound, 
sweet and clean, and may contain not more than 25 per cent of soft 
red winter wheat, and weigh not less than 59 lbs. to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 3 Hard Winter Wheat — Shall include all varieties of hard 
winter wheat of either or both light and dark colors, not clean or 
plump enough for No. 2, and may contain not more than 25 per cent 
of soft red winter wheat, and weigh not less than 56 lbs. to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 4 Hard Winter Wheat — Shall include all varieties of hard 
winter wheat of either or both light and dark colors. It may be 
damp, musty or dirty, and may contain not more than 25 per cent of 
soft red winter wheat, and weigh not less than 50 lbs. to the measured 
bushel. 

RULE No. 2— SPRING WHEAT 

No. 1 Hard Spring Wheat — Shall be sound, bright, sweet, clean, 
and consist of over 50 per cent of the hard Scotch Fife, and weigh not 
less than 58 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 1 Northern Spring Wheat — Must be Northern grown spring 
wheat, sound, clean and of good milling quality, and must contain 
not less than 50 per cent of the hard varieties of spring wheat, and 
weigh not less than 57} lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Northern Spring Wheat — Shall be Northern grown 
spring wheat, not clean or sound enough for No. 1, and must contain 
not less than 50 per cent of the hard varieties of spring wheat, and 
weigh not less than 56 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Northern Spring Wheat — Shall be composed of inferior, 
shrunken Northern grown spring wheat, and must contain not less 
than 50 per cent of the hard varieties of spring wheat, and weigh not 
less than 54 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Northern Spring Wheat — Shall include all inferior North- 
em grown spring wheat that is badly shrunken or damaged, and must 
contain not less than 50 per cent of the hard varieties of spring wheat* 
and weigh not less than 49 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 1 Spring Wheat — Shall be sound, plump and well cleaned 
and weigh not less thsm 59 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Spring Wheat — Shall be sound, clean, of a good milling 
quality, £ind weigh not less than 57} lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Spring Wheat — Shall include all inferior, shrunken or dirty 
spring wheat, and weigh not less than 53 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Spring Wheat — Shall include all spring wheat, damp, 
musty, grown, badly bleached, or from any cause which renders it 
unfit for No. 3, and weigh not less than 49 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

White Spring Wheat — ^The grades of Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 White 
Spring Wheat shall correspond with the grades of Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 
Spring Wheat, except that they shall be of the white variety. 

No. 1 Durum Wheat — Shall be bright, sound, dry, well cleaned 
and be composed of dunim, commonly known as macaroni wheat, 
and weigh not less than 60 lbs. to the measured bushel. 



82 



(Rnus II.-ni.-IV.] 



No. 2 Durum Wheat — Shall be dry, clean and of good milling 
quality. It shall include all durum wheat that for any reason is not 
suitable for No. 1 durum, and weigh not less than 58 lbs to the meas- 
ured bushel. 

No. 3 Durum Wheat — Shall include all durum wheat bleached, 
shrunken, or for any cause unfit for No. 2, and weigh not less than 
55 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Durum Wheat — Shall include all durum wheat that is 
badly bleached or for any cause unfit for No. 3, and weigh not less than 
50 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 1 Velvet Chaff Wheat — Shall be bright, sound, and well 
cleaned, and weigh not less than 61 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Velvet Chaff Wheat — Shall be sound, dry, clean, may be 
slightly bleached or shrunken, but not good enough for No. 1, and 
weigh not less than 59 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Velvet Chaff Wheat — Shall include all wheat that is 
bleached, smutty, or for any other cause unfit for No. 2, and weigh 
not less than 55 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Velvet Chaff Wheat — Shall include all wheat that is 
very smutty, badly bleached and grown, or for any other cause unfit 
for No. 3, and weigh not less than 50 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

RULE No. 3— PACIFIC COAST WHEAT. 

No. 1 Pacific Coast Red Wheat — Shall be dry, sound, clean and 
free from smut, and weigh not less than 59 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Pacific Coast Red Wheat — Shall be dry, sound, clean 
and may be slightly tainted with smut and alkali and weigh not less 
than 58 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Pacific Coast Red Wheat — Shall include all other Pacific 
Coast red wheat. It may be smutty or musty, or from any other 
reason unfit for milling purposes, and weigh not less than 54 lbs. 
to the measured bushel. 

Note. — Pacific Coast White Wheat shall be graded according to 
the rules for Pacific Coast Red Wheat. In case of a mixture of Pacific 
Coast wheat with our home grown wheat, red or white, such mixture 
shall be graded "Pacific Coast Mixed Wheat." 

Note. — The grades of Pacific Coast White and Pacific Coast Red 
Wheat are to include all such wheat that is gxx>wn in the extreme 
Northwest and on the Pacific slope from cither spring or winter 
seeding. 

RULE No. 4— MIXED WHEAT. 

Mixed Wheat. — In case of an appreciable mixture of hard and 
soft wheat, red and white wheat (except as provided in the rule of 
hard winter, red winter, white winter and Northern spring wheat), 
durum and spring wheat, any of them with each other, it shall be 
graded according to the quality thereof, and the kind of wheat pre- 
dominating shall be classed as Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 mixed wheat, and the 
Inspector shall make notation describing its character. 



[Rous V..VI.I 



83 



RULE No. 5— CORN 

The following maximum limits shall govern all inspection and 

grading of com: 

Percentage 

cob-rotten. 

Exclusive of 

Percentage bin burnt or Percentage 

of mahogany dirt and broken 

Grade. moisture. com. grains. 

1 15 1 1 

2 16 5 2 

3 19 10 4 

4 22 See No. 4 com 

rule, all colors. 

No. 1 White Corn — Shall be 99 per cent white, sweet and well 
matured. 

No. 2 White Corn — Shall be 98 per cent white and sweet. 

No. 3 White Corn — Shall be 98 per cent white and sweet. 

No. 4 White Corn — Shall be 98 per cent white, but shall include 
damp, damaged or musty com. 

No. 1 Yellow Corn — Shall be 99 per cent yellow, sweet and well 
matured. 

No. 2 Yellow Corn — Shall be 95 per cent yellow and sweet. 

No. 3 Yellow Corn — Shall be 95 per cent yellow and sweet. 

No. 4 Yellow Corn — Shall be 96 per cent yellow, but shall include 
damp, damaged or musty com. 

No. 1 Mixed Corn — Shall be com of various colors, sweet and 
well matured. 

No. 2 Mixed Corn — Shall be com of various colors and sweet. 

No. 3 Mixed Corn — Shall be com of various colors and sweet. 

No. 4 Mixed Corn — Shall be com of various colors; but shall 
include damp, damaged or musty com. 

RULE No. 6— KAFFIR CORN. 

No. 1 White Kaffir Corn — Shall be pure white of choice quality, 
sound, dry and well cleaned. 

No. 2 White Kaffir Corn — Shall be seven-eighths white, sound, 
dry and clean. 

No. 3 White Kaffir Corn — Shall be seven-eighths white, not 
dry, clean or sotmd enough for No. 2. 

No. 4 White Kaffir Corn — Shall be seven-eighths white, badly 
damaged, damp, musty or very dirty. 

No. 1 Red Kaffir Corn — Shall be pure red, of choice quality, 
sound, dry and well cleaned. 

No. 2 Red Kaffir Corn — Shall be seven-eighths red, sound, dry 
and clean. 

No. 3 Red Kaffir Corn — Shall be seven-eighths red, not dry, 
clean or sound enough for No. 2. 

No. 4 Red Kaffir Corn — Shall be seven-eighths red, badly 
damaged, damp, musty or very dirty. 

No. 1 Kaffir Corn — Shall be mixed kafiBr com of choice quality, 
sound, dry and well cleaned. 



84 



{ROLM VI.-yiL-VIIL| 



No. 2 Kaffir Corn — Shall be mixed kaffir com, sound, dry and 
clean. 

No. 3 EIaffir Corn — Shall be mixed kaffir com, not dry, clean or 
sound enough for No. 2. 

No. 4 Kaffir Corn — Shall include all mixed kaffir com, badly 
damaged, damp, musty or very dirty. 

RULE No. 7— MILO-MAIZE 

No. 1 Milo-Maize — Shall be mixed milo-maize of choice quality, 
sound, dry £ind well cleaned. 

No. 2 Milo-Maizb — Shall be mixed milo-maize, sound, dry and 
clean. 

No. 3 Milo-Maize — Shall be mixed milo-maize, not dry. clean or 
sound enough for No. 2. 

No. 4 Milo-Maize — Shall include all mixed milo-maize, badly 
damaged, damp, muaty, or very dirty. 

RULE No. 8— OATS. 

No. 1 White Oats — Shall be white, dry, sweet, sound, bright, 
clean, free from other grain and weigh not less than 32 lbs. to the 
measured bushel. 

No. 2 White Oats — Shall be 96 per cent white, dry, sweet, shall 
contain not more than 1 per cent of dirt, and 1 per cent of other 
grain and weigh not less than 29 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

Standard White Oats — Shall be 92 per cent white, dry, sweet, 
shall not contain more than 2 per cent of dirt and 2 per cent of other 
grain and weigh not less than 28 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 White Oats — Shall be sweet, 90 per cent white, shall not 
contain more than 3 per cent of dirt and 5 per cent of other grain and 
weigh not less than 24 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 White Oats — Shall be 90 per cent white, may be damp, 
damaged, musty or very dirty. 

Note. — Yellow Oats shall not be graded higher than No. 3 White 
Oats. 

No. 1 Mixed Oats — Shall be oats of various colors, dry, sweet, 
sound, bright, clean, free from other grain, and weigh not less than 
32 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Mixed Oats — Shall be oats of various colors, dry, sweet, 
shall not contain more than 2 per cent of dirt and 2 per cent of other 
grain and weigh not less than 28 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Mixed Oats — Shall be sweet oats of various colors, shall 
not contain more than 3 per cent of dirt and 5 per cent of other grain 
and weigh not less than 24 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Mixed Oats — Shall be oats of various colors, damp, damaged, 
musty or very dirty. 

No. 1 Red Oats or Rust Proof — Shall be pure red, sound, bright, 
sweet, clean and free from other grain and weigh not less than 32 
lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Red Oats or Rust Proof — Shall be seven-eighths red, 
sweet, dry and shall not contain more than 2 per cent of dirt or foreign 
matter, and weigh not less than 30 lbs. to the measured bushel. 



ibdus vni.-ix.-x.i 



85 



No. 3 Red Oats or Rust Proof — Shall be sweet, seven-eighths 
red, shall ^not contain more than 5 per cent of dirt or foreign matter, 
and weigh not less than 24 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Red Oats or Rust Proof — Shall be seven-eighths red, may 
be damp, musty or very dirty. 

No. 1 White Clipped Oats — Shall be white, clean, dry, sweet, 
sound, bright, free from other grain, and weigh not less than 35 lbs. 
to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 White Clipped Oats — Shall be 95 per cent white, dry, 
sweet, shall not contain more than 2 per cent of dirt or foreign matter, 
and weigh not less them 32 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 White Clipped Oats — Shall be sweet, 90 per cent white, 
shall not contain more than 5 per cent of dirt or foreign matter, and 
weigh not less than 30 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 White Clipped Oats — Shall be 90 per cent white, damp, 
damaged, musty or dirty, and weigh not less than 30 lbs. to the meas- 
ured bushel. 

No. 1 Mixed Clipped Oats — Shall be oats of various colors, dry, 
sweet, sound, bright, clean, free from other grain, and weigh not less 
than 35 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Mixed Clipped Oats — Shall be oats of various colors, dry, 
sweet, shall not contain more than 2 per cent of dirt or foreign matter, 
and weigh not less than 32 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Mixed Clipped Oats — Shall be sweet oats of various colors, 
shall not contain more than 5 per cent of dirt or foreign matter and 
weigh not less than 30 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Mixed Clipped Oats — Shall be oats of various colors, damp, 
damaged, musty or dirty and weigh not less than 30 lbs. to the meas- 
ured bushel. 

Purified Oats. — ^All oats that have been chemically treated or 
purified shall be classed as purified oats, and inspectors shall give the 
test weight on each car or parcel. 

Note. — Inspectors are authorized when requested by shippers to 

give weight per bushel instead of grade on Clipped White Oats and 

Clipped Mixed Oats. 

RULE No. 9— RYE. 

No. 1 Rye — Shall be dry, sound, plump, sweet and well cleaned 
and weigh not less than 57 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 2 Rye — Shall be dry, sound and contain not more than 1 per 
cent of other grain or foreign matter, and weigh not less than 55 lbs. 
to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Rye — Shall include inferior rye not unsound, but from any 
other cause not good enough for No. 2 and weigh not less than 53 lbs. 
to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Rye — May be damp, musty or dirty, and weigh not less than 
50 lbs. to the meastu-ed bushel. 

RULE No. 10— BARLEY. 

No. 1 Barley — Shall be sound, plump, bright, clean and free from 
other grain, and not scoured nor clipped, shall weigh not less than 48 
lbs. to the measured bushel. 



86 



[RuLa Z.) 



No. 2 Barley — Shall be sound, of healthy color (bright or straw 
color), reasonably clean and reasonably free from other grain and 
seeds, and not scoured nor clipped, shall weigh not less than 46 lbs. 
to the mesisured bushel. 

No. 3 Barley — Shall include slightly shrunken or otherwise 
lightly damaged barley, not good enough for No. 2, and not scoured 
nor clipped, shall weigh not less than 44 lbs. to the measured bushd. 

No. 4 Barley — Shall include barley fit for malting purposes, not 
good enough for No. 3. 

No. 1 Feed Barley — Shall test not less than 40 lbs. to the measured 
bushel, shall be cool and reasonably free from other grain and seeds, 
and not good enough for No. 4, and may include barley with a strong 
ground smell, or a slightly musty or bin smell. 

Rejected Barley — Shall include all barley testing imder 40 lbs. 
to the measured bushel, or barley which is badly musty or badly 
damaged, and not good enough to grade "feed" barley. 

BAY BREWING BARLEY. 

Bay Brewing Barley. — ^The grades of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 Bay 
Brewing Barley shall conform in all respects to the grades of Nos. 1, 2 
and 3 barley, except that they shall be of the Bay Brewing variety, 
grown in the far West and on the Pacific slope. 

CHEVALIER BARLEY. 

Chevalier Barley. — ^The grades of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 Chevalier 
Barley shall conform in all respects to the grades of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 
barley, except that they shall be of the Chevalier variety grown in 
the far West and on the Pacific slope. 

BAY BREWING MIXED BARLEY 

Bay Brewing Mixed Barley — In case of admixture of Bay 
Brewing barley with barley of other varieties, it shall be graded 
according to the quality thereof and classed as 1-2-3 Bay Brewing 
Mixed Barley. 

CHEVALIER MIXED BARLEY. 

Chevalier Mixed Barley. — In case of admixture of Chevalier 
Barley with barley of other varieties, it shall be graded according to 
the qualitv thereof and classed as 1-2-3 Chevalier Mixed Barley. 

winter BARLEY. 

No. 1 Winter Barley — Shall be plump, bright, sound and clean, 
free from other grain, and weigh not less than 48 lbs. to the measured 
bushel 

No. 2 Winter Barley — Shall be sound, plump, may be stained, 
shall contain not more than 3 per cent of foreign matter, and weigh 
not less than 46 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Winter Barley — Shall include all shrunken, stained and 
dirty barley, shall contain not more than 5 per cent of foreign matter, 
and weigh not less than 44 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 4 Winter Barley — Shall include all barley not fit for a 
higher grade in consequence of being poor quality, damp, musty or 
dirty; shall contain not more than 10 per cent of foreign matter and 
weigh not less than 40 lbs. to the measured bushel. 



(Riiua Z.-XI.-XUJ 



87 



N6tb. — ^All barley that has heen chemically treated or purified 
shall be classed as purified barley. 

RULE No. 11— GENERAL RULES 

SAMPLE GRADES. 

All wheat, barley, oats, rye and com that is in a heated condition, 
souring or too damp to be safe for warehousing, or that is badly bin- 
burnt, fire burnt, fire smoked, or badly damaged, mixed with garlic, 
onions, or containing live weevil, exceedingly dirty, or where different 
kinds of grain are badly mixed with one another, shall be classed as 
Sample Grade, and the Inspector shall make notations as to quality 
and condition. 

RULE No. 12— FEES FOR INSPECTION. 

The Chief Inspector of Grain is hereby authorized to collect 
on all grain inspected under his direction as follows: 

For In-Inspection. — 50 cents per car load; 10 cents per wagon or 
cart load; 50 cents per 1,000 bushels from boats; one- quarter of a cent 
per bushel from bags. 

For Out-Inspection. — 50 cents per 1,000 bushels and 10 cents 
per wagon load to teams. 

Note. — The inspection department shall, in no case, make a grade 
of grain above that of the poorest quality found in any lot of grain 
inspected, when it has evidently been plugged for the purpose of 
deception, or otherwise improperly loaded. 

Note. — Wheat which has been subjected to scouring, or clipping, 
or any process equivalent thereto, shall not be graded higher than 
No. 3. 

Note. — The department will, in addition to the grading of Spring 
Wheat, give dockage and grade if cleaned. 

Note. — 'The word "NEW" shall be inserted in each certificate of 
inspection of a newly harvested crop of oats until the fifteenth day of 
August; of rye, until the first day of September; of wheat, until the 
first day of November, and of barley, until the first day of November 
of each year. 

This change shall be construed as establishing new grades for 
the times specified, to conform to the existing grades of grain in all 
particulars (except the distinctions hereby established between the 
new and the old crop), and shall apply to grain inspected from store 
for two months after the time respectively above specified. 

Note. — ^AU Inspectors shall make their reasons for grading grain, 
when necessary, fully known by notations on their records. The 
weight alone shall not determine the grade. 

Note. — ^All Inspectors must ascertain the weight per measured 
bushel of each lot of wheat inspected by them and report the same in 
their records. 

W. S. COWEN. 

Chief Inspector of Grain. 



REGULATIONS 



FOR THE 



Inspection of Provisions 

Adopted by the Board of Directors 



Regulation 1. For the examination of provisions sold as 
Standard, it shall be the duty of any Inspector properly appointed by 
the Association, on receiving notice, to go to any packing house or 
warehouse in the city, to examine provisions, in such quantities as 
may be required, selecting the same in such a manner, from the lots 
specified, as, in his judgment, will give a fair sample of the whole. 

Reg. 2. If, upon examination, the property is found, in all 
respects, up to the requirements of the classification of the grades 
adopted by the Association, he shall issue a certificate to that effect, 
which certificate shall state the number of packages, pieces, or pounds 
examined, and also the number of packages, pieces, or pounds in the 
lot to which the examination is intended to apply, and that the pack- 
ages (if £iny) are in good merchantable order and condition. In the 
case of lard, no certificate for inspection shall be issued unless every 
package is examined; but on request of the owner or person ordering 
the inspection, the Inspector may examine a part of a lot, and issue a 
certificate of such examination, stating the number of packages 
examined, and also the whole number of packages in the lot. 

Reg. 3. When necessary to remove property for the convenience 
of examination, it shall be the duty of the Inspector to send for the 
same, that a fair sample may be obtained. In no case should a cer- 
tificate be granted on samples delivered by the seller. 

Reg. 4. The fees for inspection are established as follows: For 
inspection by . sampling — including repacking and coopering — Beef 
and Pork, for the first five barrels, eighty (80) cents per barrel, and for 
each additional barrel, twenty-five (26) cents. For inspecting S. P. 
Meats, for the first five tierces, one (1) dollar per tierce, and for each ad- 
ditional tierce, twenty-five (25) cents. For inspecting boxed Meats, for 
the first five boxes, one (1) dollar per box, and for each additional box, 
fifty (50) cents. When the whole of a lot is inspected — labor and 
coopering to be furnished by the seller — ^for Beef and Pork, ten (10) 
cents per barrel. For S. P. Meats, in lots of fifty (60) tierces or more, 
twelve and a half (12}) cents per tierce; in lots of one hundred (100) 
tierces or more, ten (10) cents per tierce. For bulk or boxed Meats 



89 

in carload lots or more, fifteen (15) cents per one thousand (1,000) ~mJ ***** 
pounds. For Lard in lots of one hundred (100) tierces or more, four weighing. 
(4) cents per tierce. For Tallow and Grease, five (6) cents per tierce. 

The fees for weighing are established as follows : Lard and Grease 
four (4) cents per package. 

Tallow in half hogsheads, or small packages, four (4) cents per 
package; in hogsheads, ten (10) cents each. 

Bulk or box Meats, not including labor, ten (10) cents per one stripping 
thousand (1,000) pounds. 

For stripping Lard, Grease and Tallow, fifty (50) cents per package. Brealcing 

The fees for stripping and for the weighing of property of anyrepiling. 
kind shall be divided equally between the buyer and seller. 

Rbg. 5. It shall be the duty of the Inspector, when requested by Repacked 
the owner, either at any packing-house, warehouse, or in yards pro- '*"*^^*°'*' 
vided by the Inspector, to overhaul and inspect provisions, according 
to the qualifications and classifications authorized; two hundred 
pounds of meat, with abundance of good salt, to be repacked into 
each barrel, and cooperage to be put in good order; each barrel of 
provisions that is sound, sweet, and free from any and every defect, 
to have grade and date of inspection branded thereon, and the word Branding. 
"Repacked," as hereinafter specified; and any portion that is defective 
to be branded, in like manner, *' Rusty," "Sour," or "Tainted," as the 
case may be; the said brand to be placed with the Inspector's brand 
across the regular packer's brand; such provisions, according to the 
grade or quality, to be classed as "Repacked 200 lbs." 

Reg. 6. The Inspector shall use metallic letters and figures. Branding 
marking iron, or stencil for their dates and class of inspection. 

Reg. 7. It shall also be the duty of the Inspector to put his metallic Branding, 
brand, marking iron, or stencil on all samples of provisions in tierces 
or barrels that he inspects; and he shall pass no hog products in tierces 
or barrels as Standard, unless the real packer's name, location, number 
of pieces, date, and weight of the products contained therein are 
branded, according to these Rules, on the head of every package. 

Reg. 8. Should the Inspector be called upon to inspect pickled pieUed meats, 
meats, and upon examination he should be of the opinion that t^^c^JSEJ^'^ 
number of pounds required by these Rules had not been originally 
packed, he shall not pass them as Standard, but shall refer the matter 
at once to the Committee on Provision Inspection, who shall investi- 
gate, and if a satisfactory explanation can be given or arrived at, they 
shall instruct the Inspector to proceed and inspect and pass them; but 
if not satisfactory to the Committee, they shall in their judgment, 
make the fact known to the Association in any way they may think 
most proper. 

Reg. 9. Contents of each package of pickled meats must show a Uniformity of 
reasonable uniformity in weight, according to its class. contenta. 



90 



VisitatioB of 
DAoki^g 

DOUMI. 



Cut of side 
may be 
etumced. 



Teohnioali- 
tiM. 



Reg. 10. It shall be the further duty of the Inspectors during 
the packing season to visit frequently the different packing-houses to 
see that provisions are properly dated and branded at time of being 
packed. 

Reg. 11. Dry salted rough sides may be made into short rib or 
clear sides, and dry salted short rib sides may be made into short 
clear sides, if, in all other respects, they are up to the requiiements, 
and shall be classed as Standard. 

Reg. 12. All the foregoing regulations, and the requirements as 
to the cutting and packing of hog products, must be justly and liberally 
construed, and no property shall be rejected or condemned on mere 
technicalities; but this shall not be regarded as giving license to de- 
parture from their general spirit and intent. 



REQUIREMENTS 



— AS TO THE — 



Cutting and Packing of Hog Products 



Adopted by the Board of Directors 



BARRELED PORK. 

MESS PORK. 

Standard mess pork should be made from sides of well-fatted 
hogs, split through or on one side of the backbone, £ind equal pro- S'*"*"* • 
portions on both sides, cut into strips of reasonably uniform width, 
properly flanked and not backstrapped. 

Between October 1 and the last day of February, inclusive, one 
hundred and ninety (190) pounds, and between March 1st and Sep- 
tember 30th, inclusive, one hundred and ninety-three (193) pounds 
of green meat, numbering not over sixteen (16) pieces, including the 
regular proportion of flank and shoulder cuts, placed four layers on 
edge without excessive crowding or bruising, shall be packed in each 
barrel, with not less than forty (40) poimds of coarse salt, and barrel 
filled with brine of full strength; or forty (40) pounds of coarse salt, 
and, in addition thereto, fifteen (15) pounds of salt, and barrel filled 
with cold water. 

PRIME MESS PORK. 

Prime mess pork should be made from the shoulders and sides of 
hogs weighing from one hundred (100) to one hundred and seventy- S^ie of ci^* 
five (175) pounds, net, to be cut as near as practicable into square 
pieces of four (4) pounds each; the shank of the shoulder to be cut 
off close to the breast. 

One hundred and ninety (190) pounds of green meat in the pro- 
portion of twenty (20) pieces of shoulder cuts to thirty (30) pieces of * ' 
side cuts shall be properly packed in each barrel, with not less than rSSS****"* **' 
twenty (20) pounds of coarse salt, and barrel filled with brine of full 
strength; or, twenty (20) pounds of coarse salt, and, in addition 
thereto, fifteen (15) pounds of salt, and barrel filled with water. 
There shall also be put into each barrel twelve (12) ounces of saltpetre. 

EXTRA PRIME PORK. 

Extra prime pork should be made from heavy untrimmed shoul- 
ders, cut into three (3) pieces; the leg to be cut off close to the breast, ^^'^ ""^ ^* 
and in all other respects to be cut, selected and packed as mess pork. 

91 



92 



LIGHT MESS PORK. 



Requirt- 
m«ats. 



Reqmr»- 
meote 



Raquira- 
mcnts. 



Requir»- 
m«ata. 



Require- 
meate. 



Raqulr»> 
mente. 



Light mess pork should be made from sides of reasonably wetl- 
fatted hogs; and in all other respects to be cut, selected and packed 
same as mess pork, except that as many as twenty-two (22) pieces 
may be put into each barrel. 



BACK PORK. 



Back pork should be made from the backs of well-fatted hogs, 
after bellies have been taken off, cut into pieces of about six (6) 
pounds each, and in all other respects to be cut, selected and packed 
in the same manner as mess pork. 



EXTRA SHOULDER PORK. 



Extra shoulder pork should be made from heavy trimmed shoulders, 
cut into three (3) pieces; the leg to be cut off close to the breast, and 
in all other respects to be cut, selected and packed in the same manntur 
as mess pork. 



EXTRA CLEAR PORK. 

Extra dear pork should be made from the sides of extra heavy, 
well-fatted hogs, the backbone and ribs to be taken out, the ntimber of 
pieces in each barrel not to exceed fourteen (14), and in all other re- 
spects to be cut, selected and packed in the same manner as mess pork. 

CLEAR PORK. 

Clear pork should be made from the sides of extra heavy, well- 
fatted hogs, the backbone and half the rib next the backbone to be 
taken out, the number of pieces in each barrel not to exceed fourteen 
(14), and in all other respects to be cut, selected and packed in the 
same manner as mess pork. 

CLEAR BACK PORK. 

Clear back pork should be made from the backs of heavy, well- 
fatted hogs, after bellies have been taken off, and backbone and ribs 
taken out, cut into pieces of about six (6) pounds each, and in all 
other respects to be packed in the same manner as mess pork. 



PICKLED MEATS. 



STANDARD SWEET PICKLED HAMS. 

How out. Standard sweet pickled hams should be cut short and well rounded 

at the butt, properly faced, shank cut off in or above the hock joint, 
to be reasonably uniform in size, and to average, in lots, not to exceed 

Weicht sixteen (16) pounds, with no ham to weigh less than twelve (12) 

pounds, and none to weigh over twenty (20) pounds. Three hundred 
(300) poimds block weight shall be packed in each tierce, with either 
twenty-two (22) potmds of salt, three (3) quarts of good syrup, twelve 
(12) oimces of saltpetre, and tierces filled with water, or tierce filled 
with sweet pickle, made according to above standard. To take effect 
October 1, 1000. 



93 

STANDARD SWEET PICKLED SHOULDERS. 

Standard sweet pickled shoulders should be weU cut and trimmed, How cut. 
reasonably uniform in size, and to average in lots, not to exceed 
sixteen (16) pounds. Three hundred (300) pounds, block weight, Weight, 
shall be packed in each tierce. Pickle the same as used for hams. Piokle. 

NEW YORK SHOULDERS. 

New York shoulders should be made from small, smooth hogs, Requiram«ate. 
shank cut off one inch above the knee joint, butted about one inch 
from the blade bone, neck and breast flap taken off, and trimmed close 
and smooth, reasonably uniform in size, and to average, in lots, not 
to exceed fourteen (14) pounds. Three hundred (300) i>ounds, block ^^jj^^^^ 
weight, shall be packed in each tierce. Pickle same as used for hams, pickta. 

BOSTON SHOULDERS. 

Boston shoulders should be made from medium sized, smooth, RaqairoBMnts. 
fat hogs, shank cut off about one inch above the knee joint, and butt 
cut off about two inches above the second knuckle and slightly rounded, 
neck cut square and breastflap taken off, trimmed close and smooth, 
and not to exceed twelve (12) pounds average. Three hundred (300) height and 
pounds, block weight, shall be packed in each tierce. Pickle theP^SK. 
same as used for hams. 

CALIFORNIA HAMS. 

California hams should be made from smooth, well-fatted hogs, Raquiramcnta. 
shank cut off above the knee joint, trimmed as full on the face as 
possible, butt taken off to the edge of the blade, well rounded at the 
butt in the shape of a ham, breastflap taken off, and trimmed close 
and smooth, reasonably uniform in size, and to average, in lots, not to 
exceed twelve (12) i>ounds. Three hundred (300) pounds, block weight, 
shall be packed in each tierce. Pickle the same as used for hams, pioktk 

SKINNED HAMS. 

Skinned hams should be cut and packed in all respects the same RequireoMBta. 
as Standard sweet pickled hams, except that the skin must be removed 
down to within at most four (4; inches from the shank, the fat to be 
beveled back at least three (3) inches from the lean at the butt, and 
to be neatly rounded and beveled on flank and cushion, not over one 
and one-quarter (IJ^) inches of fat to be left on any portion of the 
ham from which the skin has been removed. 

SWEET PICKLED RIB BELLIES. 

Sweet pickled rib bellies should be made from nice, smooth hogs, Requiramanta 
well cut and trimmed, to average, in lots, not to exceed fourteen (14) 
pounds. Three himdred (300) poimds, block weight, shall be packed ^^M^*** •"** 
in each tierce. y_ Pickle the same as used for hams. 

SWEET PICKLED CLEAR BELLIES. 

Sweet pickled clear bellies should in all respects be cut and packed Raquirementa 
same as above, except that all the bone should be removed. 

DRY SALTED RIB BELLIES. 

!<> ^Dry salted rib bellies shall be well cut and trimmed; no bellies RaquiiaoMnta. 
that are coarse, bruised, soft or unsound shall be accepted. 

DRY SALTED CLEAR BELLIES. 

f> Dry salted clear bellies shall in all respects be cut and trimmed Roquirein€nt». 
the same as dry salted;rib>ellies,and[subject;to'the_same requirements, 
except that all the bone shall be removed. _ _ ^ 



94 



BRANDING. 

Raquiremeota. The packer's name, location, number of pieces, and date of pack- 
ing, shall be branded on the head of each package of pickled meats, 
at the time of packing. Also, on each package of lard shall be branded 
the date of packing of such lard. 

UNIFORMITY OP PICKLED MEATS. 

To be uniform. All pickled meats should be sized when packed, the light, medium 
and heavy separately, as nearly as practicable. 



How put . 



How cut. 



Shoulder 
Uade out. 



How made. 



How made. 



How made. 



How mad*. 



CUT MEATS. 

SHOULDERS. 

Shoulders should be cut as dose as possible to the back part of the 
forearm joint, without exposing the knuckle, butted off square on 
top; neckbone and short ribs taken out, neck squared off, blood vein 
lifted and cut out, breastflap to be trimmed off, and foot to be cut 
off on or above the knee joint. 

La skinned SHOULDERS. 

Skinned shouldeis should be cut and trimmed in all respects like 
the New York shouldei, except that in addition the skin should be 
taken off to the shank and the fat trimmed off within one-half (|) 
an inch of the lean. 

BLADED SHOULDERS. 

Bladed shoulders should be cut the same as Standard shoulders, 
excepting the shoulder blade to be taken out and the comers rounded. 

ROUGH SIDES. 

Rough sides should be made by slitting the hog through or on 
one side of the backbone, and an equal proportion of both sides must 
be delivered on sales to make them Standard. 

SHORT CLEAR SIDES. 

Short clear sides should be cut reasonably square at each end, the 
backbone and ribs to be taken out, henchbone and breastbone sawed 
or cut down smooth and even with the face of the side. Feather of 
bladebone not to be removed and no incision (pocket) to be made in 
the side. 

EXTRA SHORT CLEAR SIDES. 

Extra short clear sides should be made same as short dear, except 
that all the loin must be taken off the back. 

SHORT RIB SIDES. 

To make short rib sides the backbone should be taken out, hench- 
bone and breastbone sawed or cut down smooth and even with the 
face of the side; feather of bladebone not to be removed and no incision 
(pocket) to be made in the side. 

LONG CLEAR SIDES. 

Should be cut reasonably square at both the tail end and the 
shoulder end, the neck taken off and smoothly trinmied, backbone, 
shoulder bones, and ribs must be taken out, also the 1^ bone and 
blade, henchbone and breastbone sawed off or cut down smooth and 
even with the face of the side. 



95 

BXTRA LONG CLEAR SIDES. 

Should be cut and trimmed in all respects like the long clear, except How made, 
that in addition all the loin should be neatly trimmed ofiE down to 
the fat. 

SHORT CLEAR BACKS. 

Short clear backs should be made from the sides of smooth hogs, How made, 
from which the bellies have been cut, backbone and ribs taken out, 
and the lean left on, tailbone sawed off even with the face of the 
meat, and trinmied smooth and square on all the edges. 

SHORT FAT BACKS. 

Short fat backs should be made from the sides of heavy, well- How made, 
fatted hogs, from which the bellies have been cut, backbone and ribs 
taken out, and all the lean taken off, to be trimmed smoothly and 
properly squared on all the edges. 

LONG FAT BACKS. 

Long fat backs should be made from smooth, heavy, well-fatted How made, 
hogs, the side to be cut through the center of the ribs, from the ham 
to and including the shoulder, and all the lean to be taken out, trimmed 
smoothly and properly squared on all the edges. 

CUMBERLAND SIDES. 

Cumberland sides should have the end from which the ham is How made, 
taken cut square; the leg cut off below the knee joint; the shoulder 
ribs, neckbone, backbone and blood vein taken out; the breastbone 
sawed or cut down smooth and even with the face of the side, and 
should not be backstrapped or flanked. 

LONG RIB SIDES. 

Should be made same as Cumberlands, except that the blade- How made, 
bone must be taken out, and the leg cut off dose to the breast. 

BIRMINGHAM SIDES. 

Birmingham sides should have the backbone, ribs and bladebone h^^ ^^^ _ 
taken out, pocket piece cut out and pocket nicely rounded, knuckle- 
bone left in, and 1^ cut off close to the breast. 

SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE SIDES. 

South Staffordshire sides should be made the same as Birming- n,^ ^^ ^ 
ham, except loin taken out full to top of shoulder blade, leaving only 
a thin strip of lean along the back; knuckle left in, and leg cut off 
dose to the breast. 

YORKSHIRE SIDES. 

Yorkshire sidesjshould be^made the same as Cumberlands, with How made, 
ribs out. 

IRISH CUT SIDES. 

Irish cut sides should be made the same as long dears, with the How made, 
knucklebone left in. 

DUBLIN MIDDLES. 

Dublin middles should be cut from light, smooth hogs, the side How out. 
must be thin; made same as Cumberlands, except that the leg should 
be cut off dose to the breast. 



96 



How made 



How eui. 



How out. 



Hownuula. 



WILTSHIRE SIDBS. 

Wiltshire sides should be made from smooth hogs; the shoulder, 
side and ham must be left together in one piece; the bladebone must 
be taken out, foot cut off, the shoulder same as the Cumberland, hip- 
bone taken out, not to be backstrapped, and the belly to be trimmed 
up even, the leg of the ham to be cut off above the joint. 

LONG HAMS. 

Long hams should be cut from the side by separating with a 
knife the hipbone from the rump, properly rounded out, foot unjointed 
at first joint below the hock joint. 

SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRB HAMS. 

South Staffordshire hams should be cut short, hipbone taken out 
at socket joint, hock unjointed at first joint below the hock joint. 

MANCHBSTBR HAMS. 

Manchester hams should be made in all respects like the South 
Staffordshire hams, except that the hipbone must be left in. 

THREB RIB SHOULDER. 

A three (3) rib shoulder should be made from smooth, fat hogs, 
cut three (3) ribs wide, squared at the butt, and in all other respects 
same as the standard Shoulder. 

UNIFORMITY OP BOXED MEATS. 

In packing meats in boxes, the pieces should be classified — the 
light, medium, and heavy separately, as nearly as practicable, in 
packages made to suit the different sizes. 

GREEN MEATS 

In the sale of Green Meats, it is understood that "chilled" 
weights shall be delivered. 

LARD. 

CHOICE LARD. 

Raquiremflnta. Choice lard to be made from leaf and trimmings only, either 
steam or kettle rendwed, the manner of rendering to be branded on 
each tierce. 



How made 



Diraotionof 
packing. 



Requirements. 



PRIME STEAM LARD. 

Standard prime steam lard should be solely the product of the 
trimmings and other fat parts of hogs, rendered in tanks by the 
direct application of steam, and without subsequent change in grain 
or character by the use of agitators or other machinery, except as 
such change may unavoidably come from transportation. It must 
have proper color, flavor and soundness for keeping, and no material 
which has been salted must be included. The name and location of 
the renderer, the date of packing, and the grade of the lard shall be 
plainly branded on each package at the time of packing. 

Prime steam lard of superiot quality as to color, flavor and body 
may be inspected as "Prime Steam Lard, Choice Quality," and shall 
also be deliverable on contracts for "Prime Steam Lard." 



97 

PACKAGES. 

COOPERAGE. 

Cooperage shall be made of well seasoned white or burr oak, free Materials, 
from objectionable sap. 

BARRELS. 

For barrels, staves should be five-eighths (J) of an inch thick, ^™eM»oM. 
twenty-nine (29) or thirty (30) inches long; heads eighteen (18) 
inches, one (1) inch thick in center, and three-eighths (}) at bevel; 
hoops, hickory or white oak, to be hooped, not less than eleven- Hoops, 
sixteenths (11-16), or six-hooped galvanized iron, 19 gauge, 1^ inch 
head and bilge hoops, 1} inch quarter hoops. 

To take effect on and after October 1, 1907. 

TIERCES. 

Tierces for hams, shoulders, beef or lard, should be thirty-two (32) Dimensioos. 
inches long, with a tw6nty-one (21) inch head, or thirty-three (33) 
inches long, with a twenty and one-half (20}) inch head, staves to 
be chamf erred at the head; quality of staves and hoops to be the 
same as for barrels; staves three-quarters (}) of an inch thick; head Hoops, 
same thickness as for barrels; hooped eleven-sixteenths (11-16). Iron- 
bound tierces for lard, hams or shoulders shall be classed as Standard, 
if made in compliance with the requirements of this rule, as to heading 
and staves, and hooped with not less than four (4) good hoops][on 
each end, head hoops 1} inch, 18 gauge, quarter hoops 1} inch, 19 
gauge, bilge hoops 1} inch, 19 gauge. 

To take effect on and after October 1, 1907. 

BOXES. 

Boxes should be made of sound common boards, reasonably dry. How made 
one inch thick, dressed on one side, not over three strips to each 
end, side, bottom or top; to have good, strong hardwood, whitewood 
or sap pine stays inside each comer; should be well nailed and stiapped 
with birch, oak or hickory straps around each end, to lap three inches 
on the cover. Boxes should be nailed together with tenpenny nails, 
and the stays nailed in with eightpenny nails. 



FLAXSEED 



THIS DEPARTMENT IS UNDER THE CONTROL OT THE DEPARTMENT OP 
GRAIN SAMPLING AND SEED INSPECTION." 



REGULATIONS ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF TRADE FOR THE 
GRADING AND INSPECTION OF FLAXSEED 



Weight per 

measured 

bushel. 

No. 1 North- 
western. 



No. I. 



Rejected 



No Gmde. 



Mazmer of 
inspeoting 
buficseeo. 



Section 1. The weight per measured bushel designated for each 
grade shall be that of commercially pure seed. 

No, 1 Northwestern Flaxseed — ^Flaxseed to grade No. 1 North- 
western shall be mature, commercially sound, dry and sweet. It 
shall be Northern grown or have the usual characteristics thereof. 
The maximum quantity of field, stack, storage or other damaged seed 
intermixed shall not exceed twelve and one-half per cent. The mini- 
mum weight shall be fifty-one (51) pounds to the measured bushel. 

No, 1 Flaxseed — No. 1 flaxseed shall be commercially sound, dry 
and free from mustiness, and canying intermixed not more than 
twenty-five per cent of immature or field, stack, storage or other 
damaged flaxseed, and weighing not less than fifty (50) pounds to 
the measured bushel. 

Rejected Flaxseed — All damp and musty flaxseed and that carrying 
intermixed, immature or field, stack, storage or other damaged flax- 
seed in excess of twenty per cent, and weighing not less than forty-six 
and one-half (46}) pounds, shall be graded ''Rejected." 

No Grade Flaxseed — Flaxseed that is wet, mouldy, warm or in a 
heating condition, or is in anywise unfit for temporary storage, or 
weighs less than forty-six and one-half (46^) poimds, shall be graded 
••No Grade." 

Flaxseed that is smoky, burnt, or intermixed with burnt seed. 
shall not be known by any grade, but shall be inspected in the usual 
way to determine percentage of impurities, and shall be posted as 
"Burnt or Smoky Flax." 

Sec. 2. In sampling and inspecting flaxseed received in cars, in 
bulk, by railroad, a geared screw sampler shall be passed down through 
the seed at not less than seven points equally distributed. At each 
point an equal quantity of seed shall be taken, aggregating three 
pounds, which shall be deemed an average sample of carload. When 
car is inspected, cards in duplicate shall be written stating the result, 
the one tacked to grain door of car, the other attached to sample. 
Provided, always, should the car be so unevenly loaded, either to 
quality or impurity, as to leave a doubt in the mind of the Inspector 
as to correctness of sample, he will not card the car, but note the 
fact and report to consignee. 



98 



99 

Sbc. 3. When Inspector receives notice to inspect flaxseed to or M*"f" <>' 
from bags he shall proceed as follows: As the bags are filled or aeedB in baci 
emptied, he shall take from each bag the same quantity. The sample 
80 taken shall be intermixed and three pounds taken therefrom, 
which shall be deemed an average sample of lot. 

Sec. 4. The inspection of flaxseed from elevator or warehouse Manner of 
to lake transportation shall be made by passing a grain trier of suit- IJ^^Sff^rom 
able length through each draught after the seed has been elevated to jjrehouse 
shipping scale hopper to be weighed, and drawing therefrom at each 
filling of hopper an equal quantity. From every ten samples so 
drawn an average sample of three pounds shall be taken. On com- 
pletion of shipment from any elevator or warehouse, an equal quantity 
of flaxseed taken from the accumulated three pound samples, aggre- 
gating six pounds, shall be considered an average sample of shipment 
from that elevator or warehouse. 

Sbc. 5. The inspection of flaxseed from elevator or warehouse to Manner of 
railroad transportation shall be made by drawing with grain trier, J225?from 
samples from eight points equally distributed in car, and taking from warehouse to 
each an equal amount, aggregating three pounds, which shall be 
considered a legal sample. 

Sbc. 6. To test flaxseed one pound of average impurity and Manner of 
quality shall be taken from the sample to be tested, and the impurity *«■*"*«• 
or foreign matter therein shall be removed as near as practicable by 
the use of two sieves, one with meshes three by sixteen, the other 
with meshes sixteen by sixteen. The per cent of impurity and weight 
per measured bushel of the commercially pure seed shall be determined 
by the use of proper testing scales. The impurity shall be returned 
to the flaxseed, which shall be enveloped and tagged with the result 
of test and numbered to correspond with records and kept on deposit 
sixty dayB. 

Sbc. 7. The Inspector at the date of ii\spection shall issue a Yona of 
certificate of inspection, setting forth grade (if rejected or no grade, SlT^^on ^ 
the reason why), per cent of impurity, weight per measured bushel, 
and fees. Also the name of railroad or vessel by which either received 
or shipped, the number and initial of car, and the number of gross 
bushels shipped from named elevator or warehouse. 

Sec. 8. The Inspector shall put on 'Change at the first session Pontin^ of 
of each day, week and month a tabulated statement showing i^JSJJJ^''* 
detail and totality as follows: 

The Daily — All inspections of flaxseed since last report. 

The Weekly — The amount of flaxseed in store. 

The Monthly — The inspected receipts and shipments during the 
month last past. 

Sec 9. On notice from any elevator firm that they are about to Notifications 
receive from a certain railroad flaxseed for storajje, the I inspector '^^f^^JJ,*^'} 
shall daily, in detail, report to said firm all flaxseed inspected on said jeea about Co 
road. The inspection of all flaxseed shipped from elevator shall also 
be reported in full to elevator office. 



100 



Annual 
statement of 
Intpeotor. 



Bight of 
appeal. 



Inspector 

pexvonally 

responaibli 



Fees. 



Basis of sales 
of flaxseed. 



Sbc. 10. The Inspector shall lay before the Board of Directors 
not later than the second Monday after the 2d day of January each 
year, a tabular statement of the entire inspected receipts and ship- 
ments of flaxseed the preceding year ending December 31st, with 
such information as may be of interest to the Board. Also, a financial 
report showing the receipts and disbursements of the office. 

Sec. 11. Any member of the Board of Trade , interested shall 
have the right to appeal from the decision of the Inspector to the 
Committee on Flaxseed Inspection, by giving notice in writing and 
pa3ring to the Secretary of the Board five dollars for each and every 
case appealed. If the inspection is sustained the five dollars shall 
be paid to the committee, but if not sustained to be returned. If 
practicable, the committee shall examine the seed upon which appeal 
has been taken If not practicable, the Inspector shall furnish 
sample taken by him. 

Sec. 12. The Board of Trade, in establishing the regulations 
for the inspection of flaxseed and appointing an Inspector thereof, 
assumes no liability or responsibility for errors in judgment or other- 
wise on the part of the Inspector. 

Sec. 13. The fees for inspecting and certifying flaxseed shall be 
as follows: For each car or part of car, seventy-five cents; for each 
lot in car divided by bulkhead, fifty cents; for each one thousand 
bushels from elevator or warehouse to lake transportation, seventy- 
five cents; for each two bushel bag, one-half cent; for each four bushel 
bag, one cent; for each wagon load, sixteen and two-thirds cents. 
Provided, however, that in no case shall the charge for the inspection 
of flaxseed be less than fifty cents. 

For convenience of consignors of flaxseed Section 6 of Rule XXI 
is herewith inserted : 

"All sales of flaxseed unless otherwise agreed, are made upon the 
basis of pure seed, that is: seed tendered or delivered on contracts 
may carry impurity or foreign matter, but must contain the sale 
quantity of pure seed, and for such pure seed only shaU payment be 
required." 



REGULATIONS 



— POR THB — 



Arbitration of Grass and 

Field Seeds 

Adopted by the Board of Directon 



First. Samples to be arbitrated upon must be presented to the 
committee by 12:30 o'clock p. m., and if passed upon as prime, the 
committee will issue certificate of arbitration accordingly, which in 
all cases of delivery must accompany the invoice. 

Second. A charge of one dollar per car will be made for arbitration 
fees, which, in case the sample passes as prime, shall be paid jointly 
by the buyer and seller; and if said sample fails so to pass, the fee 
shall be paid by the party tendering the sample for arbitration. 

Third. The certificate shall hold good for delivery in case of both 
timothy and clover seed for the crop year, provided in all cases the 
identity of the seed so arbitrated upon has been preserved. 

Fourth. All lots of seed to pass as prime must be of uniform 
quality throughout, and in sewed bags of merchantable quality. 

Fifth. In all sales of timothy, clover and other grass and field 
seeds for future delivery or for transfer to Eastern railroads by car- 
loads, a carload shall be deemed to contain thirty-six thousand (36,000) 
pounds. 



101 



REGULATIONS 



— FOR THB — 



Inspection of Hay and Straw 



Adopted by the Board of Directon 



HAY. 

Choice Timothy Hat shall be timothy not mixed with over one- 
twentieth other grasses, properly cured, bright natural color, sound 
and well baled. 

No. 1 Timothy Hay shall be timothy with not more than one- 
eighth mixed with clover or other tame grasses, properly cured, good 
color, sound and well baled. 

No. 2 Timothy Hay shall be timothy not good enough for No. 1, 
not over one-fourth mixed with clover or other tame grasses, fair 
color, sound and well baled. 

No. 3 Timothy Hay shall include all hay not good enough for 
other grades, sound and well baled. 

Light Clover Mixed Hay shall be timothy mixed with clover. 
The clover mixture not over one-fotuth, properly cured, sound, good 
color and well baled. 

No. 1 Clover Mixed Hay. — Shall be timothy and clover mixed 
with at least one-half timothy, good color, sound and wdLl baled. 

No. 2 Clover Mixed Hay. — Shall be timothy and clover mixed 
with at least one-third timothy. Reasonably sound and well baled. 

No. 1 Clover Hay. — Shall be medium clover not over one-twen- 
tieth other grasses, properly cured, sound and well bided. 

No. 2 Clover Hay. — Shall be clover, sound, well baled, not good 
enough for No. 1. 

No Grade Hay. — Shall include all hay badly cured, stained 
threshed or in any way unsound. 

Choice Prairie Hay. — Shall be upland hay oi bright, natural 
color, well cured, sweet, sound, and may contain 3 per cent weeds. 

No. 1 Prairie Hay. — Shall be upland and may contain one- 
quarter midland, both of good color, well cured, sweet, sound, and 
may contain 8 per cent weeds. 

No. 2 Prairie Hay. — Shall be upland, of fair color and may con- 
tain one-half midland, both of good color, well cured, sweet, sound, 
and may contain 12^ per cent weeds. 

No. 3 Prairie Hay. — Shall include hay not good enough for 
other grades and not caked. 

102 



103 

No. 1 Midland. — Shall be midland hay of good color, well cured, 
sweet, sound, and may contain 3 per cent weeds. 

No. 2 Midland. — Shall be fair color, or slough hay of good color, 
and may contain 12^ per cent weeds. 

Packing Hay. — Shall include all wild hay not good enough for 
other grades and not caked. 

No Gradb Prairib Hat. — Shall include all hay not good enough 
for other grades. 

ALFALFA 

Choicb Alfalfa. — Shall be reasonably fine, leafy alfalfa of 
bright green color properly cured, sound, sweet and well baled. 

No. 1 Alfalfa. — Shall be coarse alfalfa of natural color, or reason- 
ably fine, leafy alfalfa of good color, and may contain five per cent of 
foreign grasses, must be well baled, sound and sweet. 

^ No. 2 Alfalfa. — Shall include alfalfa somewhat bleached, but of 
fair color, reasonably leafy, not more than one-eighth foreign grasses, 
sound and well baled. 

No. 3 Alfalfa. — Shall include bleached alfalfa, or alfalfa mixed 
with not to exceed one-fourth foreign grasses, but when'mixed must 
be of fair color, sound and well baled. 

No Gradb Alfalfa. — Shall include all alfalfa not good enough 
for other grades, caked, musty, greasy or threshed. 

STRAW. 

No. 1 Straight Ryb Straw shall be in large bales, clean, bright* 
long rye straw, pressed in bundles, sound and well baled. 

No. 2 Straight Rye Straw shall be in large bales, long rye straw, 
pressed in bundles, sound and well baled, not good enough for No. 1. 

No. 1 Tanglbd Ryb Straw shall be reasonably dean rye straw, 
good color, sound and weU baled. 

No. 2 Tanglbd Ryb Straw shall be reasonably clean; may be 
some stained, but not good enough for No. 1. 

No. 1 Wheat Straw shall be reasonably clean wheat straw, 
sound and weU baled. 

No. 2 Wheat Straw shall be reasonably clean; may be some 
stained, but not good enough for No. 1. 

No. 1 Oat Straw shall be reasonably clean oat straw, sound and 
well baled. 

No. 2 Oat Straw shall be reasonably clean; may be some stained, 
but not good enough for No. 1. 

All certificates of inspection shall show the number of bales and 
grade in each car or lot inspected and plugged, and when for ship* 
ment, the final inspection and plugging, in order to ascertain the 
sound condition of each bale, shall take place at the time of shipment. 
The fees for inspection shall be three dollars per car, to be divided 
equally between the buyer and seller. 



Requirements for Grain Warehouses 

IN ORDER THAT THEIR RECEIPTS SHALL BE REGULAR FOR 

DELIVERY ON GRAIN CONTRACTS 



ADOPTBD BY THB BOARD OF DIRECTORS OP THE BOARD OF TRADE 



Propriaton 
muat be in 
good credit. 

Looation. 



FAcititi< 



Oo-operation 
with 

regist ration 
■ystem. 



Damage to 
gndn to be 
reported. 



Warehousee 
may be 
dedared 
no longer 
••regular." 



Proprieton 
fubjeoi to 
provisioBa 
of etatutee 
of UUnoia. 



First. The proprietors or managers of such warehouses shall be 
in unquestioned good financial standing and credit. 

Second, Such warehouses shall be so situated that they can be 
conveniently approached by vessels of ordinary draught, and shall 
be connected by railroad tracks with one or more of the eastern 
railway lines. 

Third. They shall be provided with modem improvements and 
appliances for the convenient and expeditious receiving, handling 
and shipping of grain in bulk. 

Fourth. The proprietors or managers shall honestly and cordially 
co-operate with the system of registration of warehouse receipts as 
established by law, and furnish to the Registrar all needed informa- 
tion to enable him to keep a correct record and account of all grain, 
together with the grade thereof, received and delivered by them daily, 
and of that remaining in store at the close of each week. 

Fifth. The proprietors or managers of such warehouses shall 
promptly, by the proper publication, advise the trade and the public 
of any damage to grain or flaxseed held in store by them, whenever 
such damage shall occur to an extent that will render them unwilling 
to purchase and withdraw from store, at their own cost, all such 
damaged grain. 

Sixth. Any important change in the conditions of any ware- 
house, or disregard or evasions of the above requirements, shall at 
any time be a sufficient cause for declaring any such warehouse no 
longer a regular warehouse within the meaning of the Rules of the 
Board of Trade. 

Seventh. The proprietors or managers of warehouses storing 
flaxseed are required to do so, subject to the provisions regarding 
grain of Sections 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16 and 17, of the law of the 
State of Illinois, entitled "An Act to Regulate Public Warehouses 
and the Warehousing and Inspection of Grain," etc., approved April 
25, 1871. 



104 



105 

Provided, That so much only of Section 12 of the warehouse law ^"^ 
as relates to weekly statements shall be applicable to flaxseed andderedto 
instead of report being made to the Registrar, report shall be noade ®*'"'***^* 
to the Secretary of the Board of Trade. 

Eighth. In the delivery of flaxseed from elevator or warehouse, ^<li'»*««"5i^ 

63COQ8B OF QflOMS 

the quantity of gross seed covered by the warehouse receipt shall be in deUvuy. 
delivered, and any excess or deficiency between the quantity of net 
or pure seed so delivered, and the quantity of net and pure seed 
covered by the warehouse receipt shall be paid for to or by (as the 
case may be) the elevator or warehouse proprietor or manager, at the 
average market price of the day of delivery. 

Ninth. The proprietors or managers of such warehouses *1^^ SSprieton iii 
accord every facility to any duly authorized committee, for theracaidto 
examination of their books and records, for the purpose of ascer- of stocks, ete. 
taining the stocks of all kinds of grain and flaxseed which may be on 
hand at any time. Such examination and verification shall be made 
at least twice each year, by the Warehouse Committee, or any other 
duly authorized committee to be appointed by the President, which 
committee shall have authority to employ experts to detemune the 
quantity of grain in the elevators, and to compare the books and 
records of the said regtdar warehouses with the records of the State 
Grain Warehouse Registrar. 

Tenth. After the 30th day of June, 1901, no warehouse shall Warehouses to 
become or remain regtdar which|yoluntarily or by the acts of itsim^ularif 
officers, agents or managers, shall have theretofore qualified, or shall JSJ^^^jJ^Ji 
thereafter qualify, in any way upon or with any other Exchange with otnerezohancib 
a view to, or for the purpose of, making the receipts of such ware- 
house regular for delivery upon such Exchange, or upon contracts 
entered into upon or under the rules of any other Exchange. 

Eleventh. The proprietors or managers of warehouses that are Obliptions of 
declared regtdar warehotises for the storage of grain and flaxseed houses to hav* 
under the rules of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago and the SS^^SiST** 
regulations and requirements of its Board of Directors, are required ^Vf^fijL^ 
to have all grain and flaxseed received in and shipped out of such Wetghmsstcr. 
warehouses weighed by the official Board of Trade Weighmaster. 

This regulation to take effect on the first day of March, A. D. 1902. 



<< 



REGULATIONS 

GOVERNING THE — 

Department of Grain Sampling and 

Seed Inspection/' 



ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE BOARD 
OF TRADE OF THE CITY OF CHICAGO. 



First. The Board of Directors shall appoint a Committee of seven 
members of the Board of Trade, who shall have and exercise general 
control over the Department under the conditions and provisions 
contained in Sections 1, 2 and 3 of Rule IV of the Rules of the Board 
of Trade of the City of Chicago. 

Second. This Committee shall appoint and fix the compensation 
of a Chief Grain Sampler, subject to the approval of the Board of 
Directors. 

Third. The Chief Grain Sampler shall furnish a bond for the 
faithful performance of all and singidar the duties of his office, said 
bond to be satisfactory in all respects to the Board of Directors. 

Fourth. The Chief Sampler may employ such assistance as 
needed, when approved by the ''Department of Grain Sampling and 
Seed Inspection," and the Department will fix the compensation for 
such assistance. 

Fifth. The Department shall make monthly reports of all receipts 
and expenditures. All expenses must be approved by the Board of 
Directors. 

Sixth. The charge for services rendered by this Department shall 
be uniform to all persons, firms and corporations, and shall not be 
changed without proper notice being given of the proposed change, 
such notice to be posted in a conspicuous place in the Exchange 
Room of the Board. This Department may charge a higher rate in 
special cases outside of the Chicago district, but in no case can it 
make any reduction from the established rates. 

106 



107 

Seventh. Nothing in the foregoing regulations shall prevent the 
buyer or seller, or his representative, from personally examining any 
car or cargo of grain bought or sold under the Rules of the Board of 
Trade of the City of Chicago, but under no circumstances can a Board 
of Trade official certificate be given by the party thus examining; 
any unofficial party, or his employer, inspecting any car or cargo of 
grain shall not have the right of appeal to the Grain Committee 
unless the grain has been loaded under the supervision of the Official 
Sampler of this Department. 

Eighth. The fees authorized to be collected by this Department 
for sampling grain shall be as follows : 

Thirty (30) cents per carload for sampling grain. 

Twenty-five (26) cents per 1,000 bushels for sampling grain loaded 
into or unloaded from vessels. 

Ninth. The Grain Comimittee shall arrange with the State Grain 
Inspection Department for the appointment of helpers whose duty 
shall be to secure samples of every lot of grain graded by the Depart- 
ment in Chicago, as far as practicable, whether such grading be in or 
out of elevators or track arrivals. The same facility shsdl be accorded 
to such helpers for the purpose of examining and sampling grain 
loaded into vessels or cars at any private elevator or cleaning house 
by the proprietors of such houses and their employes, as is now 
accorded to regular State Inspectors. 

Tenth. Such helpers shall be required to give bonds. They shall 
be subject to control and discharge by the State Grain Department, 
exactly as are the Deputy Inspectors. They shall be appointed on 
recommendation of the Grain Committee Their salaries shall be 
paid by the State Grain Department with money furnished if necessary 
by the Board of Trade. When not actively engaged in duties described 
by the State Grain Department they shall be subject to control and 
direction of the Chief Sampler in such work as he may require. 

Eleventh. It shall be the duty of such helper to bring the samples 
of graded grain, secured as above, to the Chief Sampler's office daily, 
for use in examinations by Supervising Inspectors, the Appeal Com- 
mittee and the Officisd Sampler. The identity of such samples shall 
be known, however, only to the State Department and to the Official 
Sampler. 

Twelfth. Such samples shall be kept on file in the Chief Sampler's 
office a reasonable time, labeled, however, by grades and numbers 
which shall indicate their identity only to the State Department 
and the Official Sampler, and thus unidentified they shall be accessible 
to the public. 

Thirteenth. It shall be one of the duties of the Official Sampler 
to thoroughly examine these samples daily, and in case any of them 
indicate improper grading, he shall, in case the Chief Inspector, the 
Supervising Inspectors or the Appeal Committee have not already 



108 

taken up such improper grading for correction, call their attention to 
same, explaining in what way the inspection has been too lenient or 
too rigid. 

FourUetUh. In case the Official Sampler or any other party at 
interest, i. «., the buyer or the seller, should thus complain to the 
State Department and fail to have his complaint properly or favor- 
ably considered by the State Department, it shall be the duty of the 
Sampling or Grain Committee to listen to his complaint, and if it is 
in their judgment reasonable, the other parties at interest shall be 
notified, and the matter taken up by the Grain Committee with the 
State Department — all parties at interest being given an opportunity 
of being present at such hearing. 

Fifteenth. In the examination of samples of grain inspected, a 
standard sample shall be used as a gauge, and in case of doubtful 
grain, which is very near the "line," a comparison shall be made with 
such standard sample, and in case of disputes calling for an appeal, 
final decision shall be rendered in accordance with such comparison. 

Sixteenth. Standard samples above referred to shall be made up 
as early as possible at the beginning of each crop year, and approved 
by the State Inspection Department, Appeal and Sampling Com- 
mittees and the Official Sampler — ^all working together to make up 
a fair and equitable standard. 

Seventeenth. In cases where it is necessary for the Grain or Sam- 
pling Committee to take the question of moisture into account, ren- 
dering a chemical analysis necessary, this shall be made promptly. 

Eighteenth. Nothing in the above shall be understood as giving 
the Grain Committee any privileges relative to the examination of 
samples or the knowledge of their identity other than those enjoyed 
by the public, excepting when complaint is made to them under the 
provisions of the above regtdations, or when an appeal is taken as is 
provided in Section 18 of Rule 22, 2nd paragraph, in which case the 
examination shall be made at such time and place and after such 
notification as will give all parties at interest an opportunity of being 
present. 

Nineteenth. In case it should not be feasible to obtain samples of 
track arrivals in the manner above outlined, owing to the volume of 
grain coming in, an arrangement may be made with Receivers* agents 
to work in conjunction with Inspectors to take an extra sample for 
file in the Chief Inspector's office as above outlined. 



Requirements for Warehouses 



FOR THE 



STORAGE OF PROVISIONS 

IN ORDER THAT THEIR RECEIPTS MAY BE REGISTERED AND 

DELIVERED AS ••REGULAR" ON CONTRACTS FOR THE SALE 

OF PROVISIONS UNDER THE RULES OF THE 

BOARD OF TRADE 



ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



First. The place of storage shall be such oxily as is approved by ^^'■•J^J'* 
the Board of Directors, who shall consider its location and facilities £&aid of 
for handling, receiving and shipping this class of property. Direotoii. 

Second. The proprietors or managers of such warehouses shall P^wMoxb 
be in unquestioned standing as to financial responsibility and integrity, (ood credit. 

Third, The proprietors or managers of such warehouses shall Go-openlioii 
agree to honestly and cordially co-operate with the system of r^gistra- ragjatmUoi 
tion as adopted by the Board of Trade, and furnish the Registrar all ■^■'•°*- 
needed information to enable him to keep a correct record and accoimt 
of all provisions in store in their respective places of storage; and shall 
report to him on the first day of each month the amount or quantity Monthly 
of provisions held in store by them respectively at the close of business **!*'*■■ 
on the last day of the month next preceding, whether said property is 
their own or held by them for account of others, and whether repre- 
sented by outstanding warehouse receipts or otherwise; said report to 
be made on the next succeeding business day when the first day of the 
month falls upon a Sunday or a holiday Said reports shall b^ made 
on a form of blank provided by the Registrar of Provisions, and shall Foim of 
be signed by the person, firm or corporation having such property in '^P**'*** 
charge, and shall be sworn to by either the person so signing or some Repoits to b« 
person in their employ having personal knowledge of the facts upon ■^*'™ ***• 
which the report is based. The property so reported shall be correctly 
embraced under the heads or descriptions provided for in said form 
of blank. 

Fourth. The Provision Registrar of the Board of Trade of the iU)m>inUKiflU 
City of Chicago shall appoint, at his discretion, a sufficient number g^ ^^g^ 
of Deputy Registrars, subject to the approval of the Committee on 

109 



110 



Dv^kH of , Provision Inspection, whose duty it shall be to make daily written 
pxoparmg and reports to the Registrar, of all property found by them in store and 
JjJ^*"** represented by Registered Provision Warehouse Receipts, registered 
under the Rules and Regulations of the said Board of Trade; such 
written reports to accurately describe each and every lot of provisions 
so represented, and to be submitted in such form and detail that an 
exact comparison may easily be made with each Registered Warehouse 
Receipt, registered and issued as aforesaid; and in every instance to 
be based upon official and personal identification of the property 
described in said returns. 

It shall be the duty of the Registrar to daily compile and formulate 
the reports of his deputies rendered under this Regulation, in such 
form that the quantities and descriptions of each kind of property 
represented by Registered Warehouse Receipts in all "regular" pro- 
vision warehouses shall be clearly, definitely and fully stated. 

And, further, it shall be the duty of the said Registrar to record, 
or cause to be recorded, such daily compilation, in a book prepared 
under his direction, for the special purpose of providing information 
with reference to provisions said to be stored in "regular" warehouses 
and represented by Registered Warehouse Receipts; the said book 
to be kept in the office of the Registrar, and to be accessible during 
business hours to members of this Association. 



Duty of pro- 
prieton or 
managevB to 
report anjr 
Irragularities. 



Fifth. All such warehouse proprietors or managers shall promptly 
report to the said Registrar, as the same shall come to their knowledge, 
any information touching the condition of any property held in store 
by them, under Registered Warehouse Receipts, that will tend to 
impair its value, and which it may be important and proper should 
be known to the trade. 



Duty of the Sixth. It shall be the duty of the Board of Directors prior to the 

ton to^inspecT ^^^ ^^V of June in each year to inspect, or cause to be inspected, all 
warehouMs. warehouses for the storage of provisions, the proprietors or managers 
of which shall apply to have the same declared "regular" under the 
rules of the Board of Trade, and no warehouse shall be declared a 
regular warehouse for the storage of provisions, which shall not com- 
ply with the Rules of the Board of Trade and these requirements, and 
which is not under the supervision of the United States government 
as such supervision is defined and described in an act entitled "An 
act making appropriations for the Department of Agriculture for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1907, approved June 30, 1906," (Public 
Document No. 382), nor until the proprietors of such warehouse shall 
have filed a bond in the form and conditioned as provided in the 
Rules of the Board of Trade and in the amount fixed by the Board of 
Directors, and such bond shall have been approved by the Board of 
Directors. Warehouse receipts for provisions issued by warehouses 
so declared regular by the Board of Directors shall be regular for 
delivery on contracts under the Rules of the Board of Trade so long 
Term during as the said warehouse shall continue to be a regular warehouse for the 
bouMB^ha^be storage of provisions, but the term for which any warehouse is declared 
nculftr. a regular warehouse for the storage of provisions to issue such receipts 



Ill 

shall be limited to and expire on the first day of June in each year, CJoncemmc .^ 
No receipts issued on provisions stored in any warehouse after that property stond 
date shall be regular for delivery under the Rules of the Board of jJi^^l^Sii?^'*'* 
Trade, unless the warehouse upon which it has been issued has again declared 
been declared a regular warehouse by the Board of Directors; but 
receipts for property in store in such warehouse at that date shall 
continue to be regular for such delivery so long as the property remains 
intact in such warehouse. 

Application may be made after the first day of June in any year Time of 
to have a warehouse declared regular, and the Board of Directors *pp^^***"** 
may declare such warehouse regular in accordance with and subject 
to the provisions and of said rules and requirements. 

Seventh, Any regular warehouse may, for good and sufficient Warehouwi 
reasons, satisfactory to the Board of Directors of the Board of Trade. J^jJ^dno*" 
be declared no longer a regular warehouse for the storage of pro- ]^^ts»f „ 
visions under the Rules of the Board of Trade, provided, property proviao' 
already in store in such warehouse shall continue to be regular on 
delivery so long as it remains intact in such warehouse. 

Eighth. The proprietors or managers of a regular warehouse Protection of 
shall pay any and all charges for switching cars to and from any ^S!^!" ^^i,^ 
warehouse for the purpose of loading property for delivery from such switching 
warehouse, and shall keep the holders of the receipts for such property ***"* 
free from all liability for such charges. 

Ninth. The proprietors, or managers, of a regular provision Restrietioos on 
warehouse shall not issue for regular delivery, nor shsdl the Registrar ^SS^*^™ 
of Provisions register for regular delivery, any warehouse receipts for proper 
which it is not possible to obtain proper insurance on the property by 
the party, or parties, receiving the said warehouse receipts on a 
regular delivery. 



Regulations Governing the 

Trade in Hops 



Adopted by the Board of Directors 



Wa^ibt of First. It shall be the rule that a bale of hops shall weigh not less 

than one hundred and seventy-five (175) nor more than two hundred 
(200) pounds; but the tender or delivery of any lot of hops on a sale 
or a contract, averaging one hundred and eighty-five (185) pounds to 
one hundred and ninety-five (195) pounds shall be deemed a com- 
pliance with this rule. 

Second, The sacking of hops shall not weigh more than twenty- 
four (24) ounces per yard, and seven (7) pounds shall be deducted 
from the weight of each bale as tare; and any additional weight of 
sacking, or any extraneous matter, shall be considered as irregular, 
and the seller be liable to the purchaser for such excess. 

Third. Each and every bale of hops sold must be marked with 
the grower's name or initials, and the name of the State where the hops 
have been raised, and the year produced. 



112 



REGULATIONS 

OF THE 

< Clearing House of the Board of Trade of the 

City of Chicago 

Adopted by the Board of Directors 



I. 

The style and address of each member of the Clearing House of the Board 
of Trade of the City of Chicago— in the case of a corporation, the names of its 
officers and directors and its corporate name, in the case of a firm, the names of 
its members and its firm name — ^must be immediately registered at said Clearing 
House; also, must be immediately registered any change in the style or address 
of any member of the Clearing House — ^in the case of a corporation, any change 
in its corporate name or in its officers or directors, and in the case of a firm, any 
change in the firm name or in the membership thereof. 

A fine of five dollars ($5.00) shall be imposed in case of violation of any of the 
above requirements. 

Suitable blanks shall be provided by the Clearing House for furnishing the 
information as hereinbefore set forth and required. 

A copy of all registrations, as above set forth, shall be sent by the manager 
of the Clearing House to each and every member thereof; also, a copy shall be 
filed by the Clearing House with the Secretary of the Board. 

II. 

Printed reports to show the net balances, as provided in General Rule No. 
XXII, Section 6, Paragraph 2, must be obtained at the Clearing House. 

III. 

Any person, firm or corporation, member of the Clearing House of the Board 
of Trade of the City of Chicago, whose report shows a balance against such person, 
firm or corporation, shall accompany his or its report with a check payable to the 
order of the Clearing House of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago for such 
balance; such check, if not issued by the said Clearing House of the Board of 
Trade of the City of Chicago must be duly certified, under penalty of a fine of five 
dollars ($5.00). Should payment on a certified check be stopped, the maker must 
immediately upon receiving official notice thereof, deposit with the said Clearing 
House of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago another and acceptable check. 

IV. 

All reports must be in the Clearing House by 11 :00 a. u. of each business day 
under penalty of a fine of five dollars if tardy, and the posting of the delinquent 
party on 'Change at 12:00 m., except on days when the Exchange Room is doted 
at 12:00 o'clock m., when the names of delinquents shall be posted at 11:30 ▲. M. 
All reports deposited in the Clearing House after 1 1 :05 a. m. shall be subject to an 
additional' fine of one dollar for each B,ve minutes or part thereof between 11K)6 
A. u. and the time at which they are deposited at the Clearing House. 

118 



mIRuLM V.-VI.-VII.-VIII.-IX.-X.- 
XI.-XII.-XIIIJ 

V. 

Parties having no items to clear must so report in writing, under penalty of a 
fine of one doUar for neglect of such report; and parties whose reports may be equal 
on both sides, and tl^ose whose reports show a credit balance, must put them in 
the Clearing House, under penalty, as provided in Art. IV above. 

N. B. — To insure accuracy and expedite the clearings, parties must be sure 
the amounts claimed are mutually agreed upon and correct. A penalty of one 
dollar will be collected of any party claiming from or allowing to another party 
a wrong amount, and also for each error in footing or subtraction. All doubtful 
items must be excluded from the report. 

VI. 

If a claim is not allowed by the debtor, the claimant must on notice thereof, 
pay to the Clearing House by certified check the amount claimed; such payment 
to be made before 1:00 o'clock p. m. of the day on which notice is served, under 
penalty of a fine of five dollars ($5.00). If such claim is not paid prior to 2:30 
o'clock p. M. of the same day, the Clearing House will hold whatever funds it may 
have belonging to the claimant or his creditors, until such claim is satisfied. 

VII. 

In case a party, in his report, allows another party an amotmt in excess of 
that claimed by the second party, the excess will be refunded to the first party. 

VIII. 

The charge for clearing, as provided by the Rules, has been fixed at one cent 
for each item in each report, the same to be paid monthly on presentation of the 
bill by the Clearing House. Fines to be paid at time of notification that the same 
have been incurred, under penalty of the withholding of the next amoimt due 
such debtor or reporting the delinquency to the Board of Directors. 

IX. 

Parties whose reports show a net balance in their favor may call for check 
after 2:30 p. m. 

X. 

No reports shall be amended after 11:00 a. m. 

XI. 
Office hours shall be from 9:00 a. m. to 3:30 P. m. 

« 

XII. 

No firm shall be allowed the privileges of the Clearing House while any mem- 
ber of said firm is under sentence of suspension by the Board of Directors. 

XIII. 

No corporation shall be allowed the privileges of the Clearing House while 
any officer of said corporation is under sentence of suspension by the Board of 
Directors. And whenever the President or Secretary of any corporation enjojing 
the privileges of the Clearing House shall have been expelled or suspended for 
misconduct in connection with the business of said corporation, such corporation 
shall thereafter and during the period of such suspension be entitled to the privi- 
leges of the Clearing House only after favorable action of the Board of Directort 
upon its written application for such privileges. 



(KuMS XIV.-XV.-XVI.-XVlI.l 



115 



XIV. 

Any corporation applying for membership in the Clearing Hotise of the Board 
of Trade of the City of Chicago, may be admitted to such membership only upon 
recommendation of the Clearing House Committee, in the exercise of its discre- 
tion, and upon approval by at least ten affirmative ballot votes of the Board of 
Directors; provided, that three negative ballot votes are not castjagainst any 
sttch corporation.) 

XV. 

When any member of the Clearing House, whether person, firm or corporation, 
is, in the opinion of the Clearing House Committee, using such Clearing House for 
the purpose of clearing the business of a member suspended from the privileges of 
the Board or one expelled therefrom, or of a corporation a stockholder of which is 
suspended from the privileges of the Board or expelled therefrom, the Clearing 
House Committee shall report such fact to the Board of Directors, who, in the 
exercise of its discretion, may deprive such a person, firm, or corporation of the 
privileges of the Clearing House for such period as they may see fit; the intent 
hereof being to prevent any membership in the Clearing House being used as a 
subterfuge to enable one suspended or expelled from the Board to still enjoy the 
advantages of the Clearing House, but not to prevent a member from clearing the 
individual trades made for the account and personal benefit of one suspended or 
expelled from the Board. 

XVI. 

Applications by persons or firms for membership in the Clearing House of the 
Board of Trade of the City of Chicago must be submitted to the Clearing House 
Committee and passed upon favorably by them before applicants will be entitled 
to the privileges of the said Clearing House of the Board of Trade of the City of 
Chicago. 

XVII. 

When any member of the Clearing House of the Board of Trade of the City of 
Chicago, whether person, firm or corporation, has not for the period of four con- 
secutive months cleared any trades through the said Clearing House, such person, 
firm or corporation shall cease to be a member of the said Clearing House; and no 
such person, firm or corporation can resume his or its membership in the said 
Clearing House, except by making a new application for membership therein and 
in accordance with all the provisions of Section 29 of Rule IV of the Rules of the 
Board of Trade of the City of Chicago and Regtdations XIV and XVI of the 
Regulations of the Clearing House of the said Board of Trade of the City of Chicago. 



SOLICITORS 



Under the provisions of Section 34 of Rule IV., the 
following regulations were adopted by the 

Board of Directors 



All employes engaged in soliciting business for members of this Association, 
appointed under the provisions of Section 34 of Rule IV of the rules of the Board 
of Trade of the City of Chicago, duly approved and registered, whether previously 
approved and registered or not, are subject to the following regulations: 

Solicitors employed under the provisions of said rule must be bona fide solici- 
tors. Such solicitors may receive from their employers compensation in the form 
of a fixed salary; such salary not to be changed until it has been in force at least 
six months. 

No solicitor shall be employed under the provisions of said section of Rule IV 
by more than one employer at the same time, or have any other business connec- 
tions whatsoever. 

Employers shall keep and preserve records showing the compensation paid 
their sohcitors, or solicitor, subject to the examination at any time by the Member- 
ship Committee. In the event of the discontinuance of the services of any solicitor, 
the employer of such solicitor shall immediately notify the Secretary of the Board 
of such discontinuance. 

A member of this Board acting as solicitor is not entitled to any compensation 
other^than his fixed salary. 

The names of applicants for the appointment of solicitors, together with the 
names of those submitted to be appomted solicitors, under the provisions of 
Section 34 of Rule IV of the rules of the Board, must be posted upon the bulletin 
board in the Exchange room for the period of at least ten days before being acted 
upon by the Membership Committee. 

A statement shall be filed, in duplicate, with the Secretary of the Board in 
form as given below, and said statement shall be duly recorded m the office of the 
Secretary and be accessible to members of this Association. 

STATEMENT 

Name of solicitor 

Give his age 

Where located and post office address 

Present business 

Previous business connections 

State if solicitor is in business for himself or associated in a business way with any 
other individual, firm or corporation whatsoever; and, it so, the name of such 
individual, firm or corporation 

State if he is a member of any commercial body, and, if so, the name of such body 

The foregoing regulations refer to both members and non-members employed 
as solicitors. 

116 



REGULATIONS 

For the Weighing of Grain 

Under and by virtue of the provisions of Section 2, Rule IV, of 
the Rules of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, enacted 
in pursuance of Section 10 of the Act to Incorporate the Board 
of Trade of the City of Chicago, the following regulations are 
adopted by the Directors of the said Board of Trade of the 
City of Chicago, for the guidance and information of the 
Weighing Department and the members of this Association. 

REGULATION 1. 

Received or transferred grain shall not be cleaned or blown before weighing, 
nor shall it be subjected to such handling as will cause loss in weight. This pro- 
hibition shall also apply to shipments after weighing. 

REGULATION 2. 

No dockage from actual weights shall be allowed on in-coming or out-going 
grain, except when unusual dirt or foreign matter is inseparably mixed with the 
grain, in which case it shall be the duty of the weighmaster or his deputy to deter- 
mine the amount of unusual dirt or foreign matter, and to weigh the entire con- 
tents of the car. All allowances for unusual dirt or foreign matter shall appear 
on the face of certificate issued for such cars. 

REGULATION 3. 

All cars when unloaded must be thoroughly swept and cleaned, except in 
cases where cars contain foreign matter unsuitable for mixing with grain. Then 
it shall be the duty of the Weighmaster or his deputy to determine the amount of 
grain and foreign matter to be left in the car. This amotmt shall be stated on the 
certificate of weights for each car, but such amount shall not be included in the 
net weight as shown by certificate. 

REGULATION 4. 

If hopper scales are used in determining the amount of grain a car contains, 
h shall be the duty of the elevator operators unloading such car to deliver to the 
scales the entire contents of said car except where cars contain unusual dirt or for- 
eign matter not covered by Reg. 3, because not suitable for handling by elevator. 

It shall be the additional duty of said elevator operator to clean thoroughly the 
unloading pits and the floor adjacent to such pits of any of the contents of said 
car that may have lodged there and deliver such contents to the scale to be weighed 
and credited to said car. 

REGULATION 5. 

The contents of each car shall be weighed in as few drafts as the scale incase 
will permit. 

U7 



118 



(RaauLAnom 0-7-8-0-10-1 1-ISJ 



REGULATION 6. 

The Weighmaster aad his deputies shall be allowed to handle the scale beams 
in the performance of their duties. 

REGULATION 7. 

Certificates of weight shall bear the date of weighing, and when issued for 
cars that have been loaded with grain which, for any reason, are subsequently 
returned to the loading elevator and wholly or partly unloaded, shall promptly 
be returned to the weighing department by the member, firm or corporation 
receiving such certificates. 

REGULATION 8. 

No certificates of weights shall be issued on grain unloaded or transferred 
en route unless they are applied for within a reasonable time after cars are weighed, 
and before they have had time to arrive at their destination. 

REGULATION 9. 

A straight transfer must consist of the transferring of grain from one car to 
another without its identity being lost. If transferred through an elevator, the 
grain must go direct from the western or unloaded car to the scale and from the 
scale direct to the eastern, or car to be loaded without going into or through any 
house bins. 

REGULATION 10. 

All cars that are to be loaded with grain shall be in a suitable condition to cany 
sttch grain safely. In case cars are loaded that, in the judgment of the Weighmaster 
or his deputies, are not in proper condition to carry grain safely, the parties loading 
such cars shall at once be notified, and a statement of the condition of the car 
shall appear on the face of the certificate of weight issued for such cars. 

REGULATION 11. 

The Weighmaster in regtdating the details of his office and the service of 
employes may, with the consent of the Weighing Committee, make such regula- 
tions as may be requisite or desirable in order to secure correct weights. 

REGULATION 12. 

Any member, firm or corporation of this Association receiving weight cer- 
tificates not belonging to them shall return promptly such certificates to the 
Weighing Department, in order to facilitate delivery to the rightful owner. 



REGULATIONS ADOPTED UNDER THE AUTHORITY GRANTED IN 

SECTION 22 OF RULE IV, ESTABLISHING <'THE CUSTODIAN 

DEPARTMENT OF THE BOARD OF TRADE OF THE 

CITY OF CHICAGO": 



I. 

A Custodian duly appointed by the Board of Directors, shall be placed at such 
private elevators or other buildings or places of private ownership as the Custodian 
Committee shall deem necessary and such Custodian shall keep a daily record con- 
taining the ofiBdal Board of Trade weights of all commodities dealt in under the rules 
of this Association and weighed by the Official Board of Trade Weighmaster which 
commodities have been unloaded into or loaded out of such private elevators or 
other buildings, or places of private ownership. 

II. 

When any of such commodities shall be unloaded as above provided, the 
Custodian shall promptly issue and deliver to the party for whose account the same 
is unloaded an official certificate as evidence of such tmloading, except in cases 
where the commodity is loaded out in whole or in part on the same day as received, 
in which case the Custodian shall procure the shipping receipt or bill of lading 
given for such property, and shall deliver the same to such party with a cer- 
tificate for such quantity that is not loaded out — the two together representing 
the entire quantity unloaded. 

III. 

The Custodian shall not allow the loading out of any commodity from such 
private elevators or other buildings or places of private ownership, except as 
provided in the second of these Regulations, until the proprietor or manager 
thereof shall stirrender to him for cancellation official certificates properly endorsed 
equal to the amount of the commodities to be loaded out and such commodities 
•hall be weighed by the Weighing Department of the Board of Trade of the City 
of Chicago. 

IV. 

The Custodian shall estimate daily the amount of shrinkage incidental to the 
handling, cleaning or clipping of grain, also of any variation between the "in" 
and the '*out'* weight, and report same at once to the proprietors or managers, 
and it shall be their duty to surrender to the Custodian certificates for cancellation 
sufficient to cover same. It fiirther shall be the duty of the proprietors or managers 
to keep in store at all times, in excess of all outstanding certificates, a qtiantitj 
equal to at least 3 per cent of the total quantity in store represented by out- 
standing certificates, in addition to the estimated amount of shrinkage, as here- 
inbefore provided. 

119 



120 

V. 

In such places where the commodities herein described are manufactiired 
nto products, or the original commodity otherwise changed in form, the Custodian 
may permit the proprietors or managers thereof to use such commodities without 
the surrender of Custodian certificates for the same whenever the said proprietois 
or managers shall furnish to said Custodian written evidence of the consent to such 
use by the party for whose accotint the said commodities were unloaded; provided, 
however, that the Custodian shall not issue any certificates for commoditiet 
used under such circumstances. 

VI. 

It shall be the duty of the Custodian to require the official weighing of all com- 
modities in each and every private elevator, or other building, or place of private 
ownership hereinbefore described, by the Board of Trade Weighmaster as often 
as in his judgment may be needful to enable him to accurately determine the 
quantity of commodities stored in such elevators, or other buildings, or places 
of private ownership, for the purpose of verifying the correctness of his out- 
standing certificates; or the Custodian Committee may at any time in the exercise 
of its discretion, order the weighing of such commodities. 

VII. 

Whenever, in the judgment of the Custodian or of the Custodian Committee 
it shall be deemed advisable, the proprietor, or manager, of such private elevators 
other btiildings or places of private ownership, shall be required to increase his 
ordinary line of fire insurance upon such private elevators, other buildings or 
places of private ownership and the contents thereof for which Custodian cer- 
tificates have not been surrendered for cancellation, to such an amount as may be 
determined by the Committee or the Custodian ; and such proprietor, or manager, 
shall allow an inspection of the amount and character of said insurance carried 
by such proprietor, or manager, whenever requested by the Custodian Committee 
or by the Custodian* 

VIII. 

Whenever such a course shall, in the judgment of the Custodian Committee, 
be deemed necessary, it is hereby empowered to impose upon such proprietors 
or managers the duty of preserving the identity of all grain thereafter unloaded 
into such private elevators, or other buildings, or places of private ownership; 
or in lieu thereof, the adoption of such measiire or measures as in the judgment 
of the Custodian Committee may be adepuate to protect the parties for whose 
accounts the commodities aforesaid were unloaded. 

IX 

The buyers of commodities sold and delivered as hereinbefore provided shall 
tender in payment certified checks whenever the party for whose account such 
commodities have been unloaded shall give reasonable notice of his intention to 
demand the same and the latter may retain in his possession the Custodians 
certificate until such certified check is thus tendered. 



121 

X. 

It shall be the duty of the Custodian at such private elevator or other building 
or place of private ownership at the close of each day to seal the engine, shipping 
bins or other bins, or to adopt any other measures which in the judgment of him- 
self or the Custodian Committee are necessary to prevent the removal of grain or 
other commodities from such private elevator or other building or place of private 
ownership during the absence of such Custodian. 

XI. 

All such commodities unloaded as aforesaid shall be held in such private 
elevator or other building or place of private ownership and shall not be released 
therefrom except in accordance with the Rules and Regulations of this Association 
governing the Custodian Department, but the Custodian, his assistants or sub- 
ordinates shall not be liable in their official bonds or otherwise for any losses unless 
such losses are directly attributable to the negligence or misfeasance of said 
Custodian, his assistants or subordinates in issuing certificates for commodities 
not in fact unloaded or in allowing, during the hours when such private elevator 
or other building or place of private ownership is open for business, such commo- 
dities to be loaded out without requiring the surrender of official certificates for 
the same and nothing herein or any custom or private agreement to the contrary 
shall be construed to extend such liability; provided, however, that the Board 
of Trade of the City of Chicago shall in no case be liable for any losses except 
to the extent that such losses are due to its failure to keep in force a good and 
reasonable bond for the honesty and fidelity of said Ciistodian, his assistants 
or subordinates. 



OFFICIAL CERTIFICATE 

— OP THE 

CUSTODIAN DEPARTMENT OF THE BOARD OF TRADE 

OF THE CITY OF CHICAGO 



No , 

Chicago, Illinois, 101 .... 

I hereby certify that this day at under the 

supervision of this Department pounds of were 

unloaded from Car No which will not be 

loaded out except upon surrender of this receipt for cancellation as provided in 
the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago governing 
the Custodian Department. 



REGULATIONS ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS IN 

ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 23 OF 

RULE IV FOR THE BETTER CONTROL OF OUR 

MARKET RECORDS AND REPORTS. 

I. 

Every person, member, firm or corporation receiving quotations of Thb 
Chicago Board op Trade, shall make application to and receive approval from 
the .f Market Report Committee bbporb making any wire connections, either by 
telegraph or telephone, whether used for sending such quotations, or for any other 
purpose whatsoever. 

II. 

On and after the 1st day of May, 1911, no member of this Association trans- 
acting business in his own name or in the name of a firm, one at least of whose 
partners is a member of this Association, or in the name of a corporation, one at 
least of whose executive officers is a member of this Association, shall furnish by 
means of any telegraph or telephone wires the continuous market quotations of 
this Board of Trade to any office or place of business located in any city, town or 
village where such service is not furnished at the present time, unless upon written 
application thereto, the Board of Directors shall, by a majority vote, grant to said 
member, firm or corporation permission to supply said contmuous market quo- 
tations. 

III. 

The Market Report Committee is empowered to examine into the conduct of 
all private offices or places of business receiving the continuous market quotations 
of this Board of Traae at the present time and in such places where the said com- 
mittee shall deem the continuation of such service detrimental to the best interests 
of this Association, it shall report the facts immediately to the Board of Directors, 
which body shall take such action as in their judgment best conserves the interests 
of all parties involved. 

IV. 

The furnishing of said continuous market quotations to any individual, firm 
or corporation, where the same are for the personal use and convenience exclusively 
of the individual, firm or corporation receiving the same, and where said market 
quotations are not accessible to the public, or to legitimate health or pleasure 
resorts during their regular seasons, is not forbidden by these Regulations; but 
the furnishing of such service shall be subject at all times to the approval of the 
Board of Directors. 

V. 

The dissemination of continuous market quotations of the Board of Trade of 
the City of Chicago over all telephone wires is strictly prohibited. This does 
not prohibit ordinary conversation where dissemination of quotations is not con- 
templated. 

VI. 

No member of this Association shall, by messenger, signals, telephone, tele- 
graph, or any other means whatsoever, convey or transmit continuously the market 
quotations from the Exchange floor to any person, firm or corporation located off 
said Exchange floor; and any member violating this regulation shall be deemed 
guilty of dishonorable conduct and subject to the penalty provided therefor in the 
rules and by-laws of this Association. 

122 



REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE ADMISSION OF MESSENGERS 

TO THE EXCHANGE ROOM, AND DEFINING THEIR DUTIES 

AND PRIVILEGES WHILE IN SAID ROOM, AUTHORIZED 

BT RULE XI OF THE RULES OF THE BOARD. 



Adopted by the Board of Directors December 26, 1911. 

First: No messenger shall be permitted to enter the Exchange Room without 
a badge. 

Second: Messengers may deliver messages to or receive messages from their 
employers or members or brokers representing such employers, and shall thereafter 
return to the positions assigned them by the Room Committee, or leave the floor. 

Third: Messengers are not permitted to receive or to send telegraphic or 
telephonic messages. 

Fourth: Messengers are strictly prohibited from writing, receiving or 
delivering papers, such as shipping directions, confirmations, transfer slips, gossip, 
account sales, etc., in the Exchange Room, with the exception that they may deliver 
to or receive such papers in said room from, their employers, or from members or 
brokers representing such employers. 

Fifth: Messengers are not permitted to signal markets, or copy figures from 
bulletin boards. 

Sixth: Signaling to messengers or to non-members, of quotations or orders 
is not permitted. 

Seventh: Messengers are not permitted to run in the Exchange Room, nor 
in the corridors of the building. 

Eighth: There shall be no deviation from the above regulations* except in 
cases of emergency, and then only upon application to and approval of the Room 
Committee. 

128 



INDEX. 



PAGB 

Absence of buyer when tender is made 51 

" of Director for six consecutive meetings 20 

Acceptance of bids or offers in open market 42 

" or rejection of sample stuff. 55 

Accused members to be heard 17 

to be notified 17 

Act. of bad faith .... — — ...... ..«^...... 15 

" of dishonesty 17 

" of incorporation....... »i.. .««.....«... „<-.»..«:. 5 

Adjournment of Exchange ..... — . 71 

Advances, interest on .n. «. 56 

Agent for both buyer and seller 15 

Amendments to Rules — ^how submitted « 70 

Annual assessment — How made.. 13, 28 

Failure to pay « 28 

" election 10 

" meeting . 25 

Answers which might incriminate witness 16 

Appeal Committee — Awards of 25 

Duties of 25 

Pees of 27 

How constituted .« 10 

Vacancies on 26 

Appeal from inspection of — Flaxseed. 100 

Flour. , 74 

Provisions 61 

Chief Sampler 57 

Appeal — graded subject to 55 

" to Grain Committee 67 

Applicants for membership — Misstatements of 28 

Qualifications of 27 

Appointees — ^bonds of 12 

" term of office 12 

Appointments — ^Announcement of 13 

Certificates of ^ 24 

When and how made 12 

Revocable 12 

124 



125 

Appropriations 35 

Arbitration Committee — Awards of 25 

Duties of 25 

Fees of « 27 

Arbitration Committee — How constituted.. . . , 10 

Vacancies on 26 

Arbitration agreement 26 

" for non-members 27 

* of disputes regarding margins .....*•. 40 

" of grass and field seeds ^« *« ^ 101 

" postponement of 26 

Assessment — ^Annual % « 28 

Special 22 

Attorney — Employment of mm 19 

Awards of Arbitration and Appeal Committees 25 



Ballots — When properly counted 11 

Preservation of 11 

Bankruptcy proceedings 17 

Banks — Depositories for margins 37 

May be objected to 37 

Board of Directors — How constituted 10 

Powers and duties of.. 12 to 21 

Quorum of ^ ....... . 10 

Regular meetings of 12 

Special meetings of 10, 69 

Report to Association 13 

To regtdate rooms 13 

Board of Trade weights 56 

Bonds of appointees 12 

of banks 37 

" of regtdar grain warehouses 40 

" of regtdar provision warehouses 110 

Books and records — Power to call for * 17 

Boxed meats — Weight of 67 

Boxes for provisions 97 

Branch offices — Private wires to 19 

Reports of, to be made 19 

Branding packages of provisions 89 

Brokerage — By grade alone 29, 30 

On carload lots, by grade alone 80 

On carload lots, by sample 30 

On C. I. F. transactions 31 

On "contract" provisions 80 

On seeds, per car and per bag 30 

Or commission on every transaction 29 

When special location or character is stipulated 29 

On indemnities 60 

Brokers defined 29 

Brokers — Liability of «^ 29 

Bucket Shops — Connection with 18 

Executing orders in 18 

By-Laws. •••...•....••....«.... 67 



126 

PAOB 

Call Committee 22 

Call— Establishment of 23 

Evasion of 23 

Trading on 23, 36 

Carload— Weight of 64 

Cash price contingent on futures 34 

" purchases, when delivered «•..... 51 

• time of pajrment 56 

Certificates of appointment 24 

* of inspection to govern 18 

" of membership , 28 

" of weights to govern 18 

Chairman — ^Temporary •» 20 

Charges filed — Form of 16 

How signed 16 

Hearing on 17 

By non-members 17 

Against elevator proprietors 42 

Citation to appear, testify and produce books 16 

Clean certificates may be demanded 55 

Cleaning or Clipping 56 

Clearing House — ^Admission to 20, 21, 22 

Government of 53 

Membership in 20, 21 

Regulations of 113 to 115 

Reports to 54 

Suspension from 21, 22 

Commission rates — On grain, by grade alone 31 

On contract provisions 31 

One-half rates on property by grade alone 31 

To members doing their own trading 31, 32 

When trades are not closed in 10 dayB 31, 32 

Examples showing how rates are applied 32 

One side only executed by principal 32 

On cash grain, receiving and selling, or buying 32, 33 

On bran, middlings, etc 33 

On hay and straw 33 

On broom com 33 

On seeds 33 

On grain in canal boats 33 

On grain, seeds and provisions, to arrive 33 

Three-fourths rates on cash property 33 

On vessel lots 33 

Charges in addition to 34 

Members' rates to corporations 34 

Membership carries rates to but one firm or corporatioii . . 34 

Constructions regarding 34 

Cash price contingent on futures 84 

Aggregate brokerage cannot exceed minimum 84 

Clearing rates cannot be divided 35 

Special partner cannot give firm half rat^ 85 

Commission rates — When only part of firm is principal 85 

Penalty for violation of Commission rule 35 

Reward for evidence of violation 35 

Complaint — Form of 16 

How signed 16 



127 

PAOB 

Complaint — Hearing on 17 

By non-members 17 

Against elevator proprietors 42 

Confirmation of trades 52 

of offsets 62 

" of indemnities 57 

Contract grades — ^Wheat 50 

Com 50 

Oats 51 

Elevators cannot ship 41 

Contracts to be at one figure of price 36 

Cooperage 97 

Co-partnership in questionable firm 23 

Corporations — Admission of, to Qearing House 20 

Capital stock impaired 21 

Insolvency of 22 

Members' rates to 34 

Officers of 54 

President and Secretary must be members 53 

Statements of 20, 21 

Suspension from Clearing House 21, 22, 54 

When name may be given as principal 53 

Criminal statutes, violation of 15 

Custodian Department 18 

Custodian Department Regulations 119 

Cutting and packing of meats, requirements for 01 to 97 

Damages account of inspection 63 

Date of packing 65 

Dealing in differences 13 

Deceased member, membership of, how transferred 28 

Def avdt in deliveries 44 

" on time contracts 61 

Delay in payment for cash property 54 

Delegates, appointment of 19 

Deliveries — How made 40 to 50 

By registered regular warehouse receipts 40 

Free of storage for five days 40 

Must carry insurance 42, 47 

Before 11 A. M. in offices 42 

After 11 A. M. in Exchange Hall 42 

Form of notice of readiness to deliver 42, 44, 45 

Delivery price to be posted twice each day 42 

Endorsements on delivery notice 43 

Holding notice longer than five minutes 43 

Improper endorsements on delivery notice 43 

Alteration of delivery notices 43 

Substitution of property for that described 43 

Notices must be consecutively numbered 43 

Sufficient tender on 43 

When notice is to be presented for payment 43, 44, 45 

Differences to be on basis of full delivery 43 

Responsibility for differences : 43 

Differences due and payable immediately 43, 44 

On first day of the month .43, 44 



128 

PA.OB 

Deliveries — Property not called and paid for 42 

Notice of default, how disposed of 42 

Exi)ense on property defatilted on 42 

Buyers to be present on delivery ..«.«•«.« 45 

Admission denied during 45 

Inability to deliver account buyer's adsence 45 

Notice of default, how served 45 

Fraudulent notice 45 

Improper disposition of property 45 

On Saturdays 45 

On Saturda3rs when on last business day of month 46 

On Saturday P. M., interest, insurance, etc., not added 46 

Secretary may extend time of 46 

Liberal construction ofrule re 46 

Violation of rule re 46 

Must be of quantity sold 47 

Must be in lots of 47 

Excess or deficit, how settled for 47 

Of flaxseed 49 

Of provisions 63 to 67 

Of provisions of inferior quality 66 

Delivery to eastern line relieves seller 55 

" of cash grain 51 

" in store without agreement ■, 51 

" by offsets 51 

" prices to be posted 51 

Depositories for margins 36, 37 

" may be objected to 37 

Deposits on time contracts 36 to 40 

Deputy inspectors — ^Appointment of 62 

Differences — ^Dealing in 13 

Directors — Absence of 20 

Regular meetings of 12 

Special meetings of 20, 69 

Report to Association 13 

Resignation of 19 

Quorum of 10 

Powers and duties of 12 to 21 

Discharge in bankruptcy .......: 17 

Dishonest Conduct 15 

Dishonorable conduct 15 

Disinterested weights 54 

Disorderly conduct 12 

Disqualification, account of financial interest 11 

Drops • . . . 19 

Dry salted meats — ^Weight of 67 

Dues 13, 28 

Dues — Failure to pay 28 

Bighty per cent, of sale price may be demanded 56 

Election — ^Annual .....;....... 10 

Special 10,19 

Of officers of the Association 10 

Procedure at 11 

Returns of 11 

Tellers of 11 



r «• /* 



« « 



129 

FAOB 

Elevator proprietors — Cannot ship contract grades 41 

^_^ J, i : / Cannot buy at non-competing points 41 

. ^ Complaint against 42 

i'l :S To be in good financial standing 40 

<i t- *^-\ To file bonds 40 

Elerators — See "Regtdar" grain warehouses. 

Emergency requiring extra storage room 42 

Employe cannot trade giving employer's name 15 

Error in decision of Board of Directors 16 

Errors in inspecting provisions 03 

Excess or deficit — ^In quantity delivered 47 

In deliveries of flaxseed. 105 

On lard 40 

On sales to arrive 54 

Execution of orders must be in oi>en market 14 

Expelled member — How readmitted 16 

Vote necessary to readmit 16 

Expulsion — ^Vote necessary for 15 

Extortion — ^Attempt at 15 

Extra storage room 42 

Failure to call and pay for property 44 

" to receive and deliver on time contracts 61 

False or fictitious trades 15 

testimony — Suspension on 16 

Expulsion on 16 

Pees — Of Arbitration and Appeal Committees 27 

Of Grain Committee 57 

Of Flaxseed Inspector 100 

Of Flour Inspector 74 

Of Hay Inspector 103 

Of Grain Inspector 87 

Of Grain Sampler 107 

Of Provision Inspector 88 

Of Provision Inspection Committee 61 

Of Provision Registrar « 63 

Of Weighmaster 89 

For transfer of memberships 28 

For stripping lard 80 

Financial interest — Disqualification by , 11 

* statements of corporations 20, 21 

Fine for absence of member of Arbitration Committee 26 

" for non-appearance for trial 27 

Firms — ^Admission to Clearing House .21, 22 

All partners must be members ' 22 

Entitled to members' rates .31, 34 

Insolvency of 22 

Questionable — Co-partnership in , 23 

Special partnership in 35 

Suspension from Clearing House 21, 22 

Flaxseed — ^Appeal from inspection of 100 

Certificate of inspection of 100 

Deliveries of .....,.•• 49 

Fees for inspection of * 100 

Excess of deficit — How settled for 105 

Grades of 98 



130 

PAOB 

Flaxseed — Inspector — Duties of 9S to 100 

Inspection of 98 

Posting returns of 99 

Registrar — Duties of 49 

Registration of 49 

Regulations 98 

Testing 99 

Plour — ^Appeal from inspection of 74 

Cartage of 75 

Fees for inspecting 74 

Inspection Committee 70 

Loading of 74 

Regulations 72 to 77 

Sacks — Quality of 75 

Weight of packages 73 

Forfeiture of membership 28 

Frozen joints 66 

Fully cured meats 66 

( }ood name of Association — Conduct affecting 17 

Government of Association — How vested w . . 10 

Graded subject to appeal — Grain 55 

Grades oi grain — ^Wheat *. 80 to 82 

Com 83, 84 

Oats 84 to 86 

Rye 85 

Barley 85 

Contract 50, 51 

Grades and qualities — Power to establish 18 

Grading — Improper 107 

Grain Committee — ^Appointment of 57 

Appeal to 57 

Disqualification of members of 57 

Fees of 57 

Grain — Contract grades of 50, 51 

Grading of 80 to 85 

Grain Sampling Department — Fees of 107 

Helpers in 107 

To preserve samples 107 

Regulations of 102 to 108 

Standard samples kept in 108 

Grain Warehouses — See "Regular" grain warehouses. 

Grass and Field Seeds — Arbitration of 101 

Grave offense 17 

Green Meats, weight of 96 

Hay and Straw — Fees for inspecting 103 

Grades of 102 

Inspection of • 103 

Regulations 102, 103 

Hog products, how packed 64 

Holiday — Contracts maturing on 51 

Directors may declare a 71 

No Directors meeting on 12 

Hops — Regulations re 112 

Hours for regular trading 35 



131 

PAOB 

Jmmediate shipment defined 57 

Improper grading 107 

Inability of railroad to handle property 65 

Incorporation — Act of 5 

Indemnities — Contracts for 58 to 61 

Brokerage on 60 

Commission on 60 

Insolvency 22 

Inspection — Of flaxseed 98 

Of flour 72 to 77 

Fees for 74, 87, 88, 103 

Of grain 80 to 86 

Of provisions 65 

Of seeds 106 

Failure to pass 66 

Inspector — Of flaxseed 98 

Of flour 74 

Of provisions 61 

Instructions to be furnished within 48 hours 66 

Insurance on grain in regular warehouses 42, 47 

Insurance on provisions in regtdar warehouse Ill 

Insurance, etc., to be charged 34 

Interest on advances 56 

In transit property — Notification re 33 

Irregtdar trading 35 

" transactions, not at contract price 36 

Irregularities of warehousemen to be posted 47 

Xjard — ^Requirements for standard 96 

Sales of 65, 66 

Stripping 89 

Tare on 66 

Weight of 66 

Legal counsel — Employment of 19 

Liability of brokers 29 

Liquidated damage of 1 per cent, per day 56 

• 

Margins— On time contracts 36 to 40 

Where deposited 36 

Form of memorandum of deposit 37 

Certificates of deposits of 37, 38 

Ten per cent, may be called 36 

How released 38, 39 

May be deposited with the Treasurer 36, 38 

Disposition of certificates 38 

Must be xmt up within one banking hour 38 

Failure to deposit 38 

Call for — How served 39 

Select committee to dispose of 39 

Refusal to endorse down 39 

Excessive — How released 39 

Arbitration of disputes regarding 40 

Determining value of property with reference to 40 

Market reports — Department of 18 

Dissemination of 19 

Regulations re 122 



132 

FAOB 

Meetings of Assodation — ^Annual 25 

Special 11, 20 

How called 11 

Meetings of Directors — ^Regular 12 

Special 19, 69 

How called. 20 

Notice of — ^How served 20 

Members rates TT. . . 31. 34 

Membership— Applicants for, qualifications 27 

Committee on 27 

Certificate of 28 

Forfeiture of 28 

Obtained by misrepresentation 28 

Carries rates to but one firm or corporation 34 

Messengers 29, 123 

Moisture — ^Test for 108 

National Board of Trade — Delegates to 19 

Names and prices to be furnished customers 54 

Non-competing points, buying at 41 

Notice of hearing of complaints — How served 17 

Notification on purchases to arrive,^or in transit 33 

Oath of office of members of Arbitration and Appeal Committee 26 

Oaths — Power to administer 86 

Objects of the Association 9 

Officers of the Association 10 

" of corporations — Liability of 54 

Official sampler — Approval by 57 

One figure of price — Contracts to be made at 36 

One per cent, per day liquidated damage— Charge of 56 

Open market — Orders must be executed in 14 

Options to buy or sell •« 15 

Orders mtist be executed in the open market 14 

" for switching 55 

Partnership in questionable firm • 23 

Payment for property — Delay in 55 

Time of 56 

Personal conduct — Improper , 15 

Postponement of arbitration trial 26 

Power to call for persons and papers 17 

President — Duties of - 11 

Press tickets 28 

Principal and agent — Member cannot be both 15 

Private wires to branch offices 19 

Privileges — Trading in 14 

Professional counsel not allowed 17 

Prompt shipment defined 57 

Proper questions — Refusal to answer 16 

Provision Inspection Committee 61 

Provision Inspector — Appointment of 61 

To keep records 62 

Fees of 63 

Duties of 88 to 90 



133 

Provision Registrar — ^Appointment of 62 

Duties of 110 

Pees of 63 

Provision Regulations 88 

*' Warehouse receipts — Character of 62 

Registration of 62 

*' Warehouses — See "Regular" provision warehouses. 

Proviiioiis — ^Rules regarding 61 to 68 

Delivery of 63 to 68 

Pees for inspecting 88 

Must be standard 64 

Registration of 65 

Repacking of 89 

Sale of 64 

Standard — ^Requirements for 64 

Weighing of 68 

Public reports affecting good name of Association 17 

Puts and calls — ^Trading in 14 

Questions, proper — ^Refusal to answer 16 

Quick shipment defined 57 

Ottorum of Board of Directors 10 

" of Association 86 

" Arbitration Committee 25 

TeUers 11 

Ottotations — Department of 18 

Dissemination of 18 

Protection of 14 

Real estate — Management of 10 

Receipts regular on another exchange 105 

Refusal to answer proper questions 16 

Registrar of Plaxseed 49 

Registrar of Provisions — ^Appointment of 62 

Duties of 110 

Registration of flaxseed receipts 49, 50 

" of provision warehouse receipts .' . 62 

Regular grain warehouses — How declared regular 40, 41 

Qualifications 40 

Proprietors in good financial standing 40 

Proprietors to file bonds 40 

When made regular 41 

To be examined before Jtily 1st 40 

Contents to be removed before being made regular 41 

Requirements for 104 

No applications to be made regular 42 

Emergency requiring extra storage 42 

Cannot ship contract grades 41 

Overloading — How remedied 41 

Cannot buy at non-competing points 41 

Storage rates in 40 

Supervising inspectors in 41 

Receipts regular for 6 months 41 

Receipts — How declared irregular 41 

Complaints against proprietors of 42 

Irregularities of — ^To be posted 47